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Apistogramma gephyra (and "Rio Xingu")

Contents:

  1. gephyra or agassizii?
    by Marco Lacerda <marcolacerda/ax.apc.org> (Tue, 14 Oct 1997)
  2. red tail Rio Xingu
    by "Helen Burns" <hlnburns/thefree.net> (Tue, 15 Dec 1998)
  3. red tail Rio Xingu
    by Marco Lacerda <marcolacerda/ax.apc.org> (Wed, 16 Dec 1998)
  4. red tail Rio Xingu
    by Jota Melgar <jsmelgar/compuserve.com> (Wed, 16 Dec 1998)
  5. red tail Rio Xingu
    by Mike & Diane Wise <apistowise/bewellnet.com> (Wed, 16 Dec 1998)
  6. Apisto sp. aff. Agassizii ID?
    by Mike & Diane Wise <apistowise/bewellnet.com> (Wed, 24 Feb 1999)

gephyra or agassizii?

by Marco Lacerda <marcolacerda/ax.apc.org>
Date: Tue, 14 Oct 1997
To: apisto/majordomo.pobox.com

Hi!

Recently Randy explained very well the differences between Apisto 
agassizii and Apisto gephyra.
He listed (if I remember it correctly):

1) longest tip of last dorsal fin ray in A. agassizii (shorter in A. 
gephyra);
2) longest tip of pelvic fin in A. agassizii (shorter in A. gephyra);
3) caudal fin shape strongly lanceolated in A. agassizii (slightly 
lanceolated or round in A. gephyra);
4) A. gephyra has points/markings only on upper part of caudal fin, and 
not on the lower part.

I would also add that A. gephyra is slightly deeper bodied than A. 
agassizii.

That's all ok, but recently I had problems to identify fishes from upper 
Rio Negro (Igarape Urupau). The features of fishes from that locality 
are (now that the fishes are about eight months old in aquarium):

1) very long tip of last dorsal fin ray, fitting very well A. agassizii;
b) very short tip of pelvic fin, FITTING VERY WELL A. GEPHYRA (when 
compared to A. agassizii from other localities, i.e., lower Amazon 
populations, very very short pelvic fins).
c) strongly lanceolated caudal fin, fitting very well A. agassizii;
d) NO POINTS OR MARKINGS on both upper and lower parts of caudal fin, 
but instead of it, orange-reddish color. There is just an edge for both 
upper and lower parts of caudal fin.
e) about body depth difficult to say exactly without pickling the 
fishes.

Does anybody or RANDY himself have any opinion about it?
The Rio Negro is known to shelter both A. agassizii and A. gephyra.

All the best, Marco.


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red tail Rio Xingu

by "Helen Burns" <hlnburns/thefree.net>
Date: Tue, 15 Dec 1998
To: <apisto/majordomo.pobox.com>

Jason,
I have had success with this species from wild caught and and presently from
F1 pair.
Temp 79F    pH 6.-6.5    Tank 12in x 12in x 12in.
Double sponge filter.  Java moss and fern, bogwood.
Three small inverted clay pots with drainage holes enlarged.
I have fry still in this tank at the age of 4 weeks, with parents.  I
noticed this afternoon that the female is about to spawn again.  I intend
tomorrow while carrying out the water change removing the current fry to
their own tank.
I feed the adults frozen bloodworm, whiteworms, tetra prima, adult live b.s.
Doesn't seem that much different from what you are doing, just be patient.
Helen


>Has anyone obtained fry from this fish?
>What were the parameters?
>I think mine have spawned several times ( the female changed colour and
>disappeared for a couple of days), but nothing seems to come of it.
>pH 6, 82*, 30ppm. I feed blackworms, bbs and bloodworms.
>Any hints?
>Thanks
>Jason





red tail Rio Xingu

by Marco Lacerda <marcolacerda/ax.apc.org>
Date: Wed, 16 Dec 1998
To: apisto/majordomo.pobox.com

Mayalauren@aol.com wrote:
> 
> Has anyone obtained fry from this fish?
> What were the parameters?
> I think mine have spawned several times ( the female changed colour and
> disappeared for a couple of days), but nothing seems to come of it.
> pH 6, 82*, 30ppm. I feed blackworms, bbs and bloodworms.
> Any hints?
> Thanks
> Jason

Dear Jason,
I've bred it in similar water conditions, it is normally a medium to 
easy fish.
Sometimes such problem (infertile eggs) are not due to water conditions, 
but to the fertility of one of the parents.

Cheers.





red tail Rio Xingu

by Jota Melgar <jsmelgar/compuserve.com>
Date: Wed, 16 Dec 1998
To: "INTERNET:apisto/majordomo.pobox.com" <apisto/majordomo.pobox.com>

Jason,

We had success with water ranging from ph 5.0 to 6.5. Perhaps the only
difference beeing a slight decreese in viable eggs at the higher values.
Treat them no different than an Aggie or gephyra and you shouldn't have too
much trouble. Pretty fish worth the effort.

Julio




red tail Rio Xingu

by Mike & Diane Wise <apistowise/bewellnet.com>
Date: Wed, 16 Dec 1998
To: apisto/majordomo.pobox.com

Jason,

I got this species from Marco Lacerda at the 1997 ACA Convention in Chicago. They
spawned for me within a month of getting them home under conditions similar to
Helen's. I, too, find the female an exceptional parent, even to having two spawns
in the same tank (18X16X10 in.) at the same time. Marco & I have an article on
this species coming out soon in the Buntbarsche Bulletin.

One thing I would definitely change is feeding black worms. No matter what people
claim, they are a tubificid worm that needs an organic rich environment to live
in. There is always a chance of bringing in diseases since they can't be totally
cleaned out. I can't tell you the number of times I've had people call or write
me about their apistos coming down with something nasty after feeding black
worms. There are so many other good live foods out there. No one needs red or
black tubifex. I'd substitute chopped earthworms or white/grindal worms for them.
They may take a little more effort to cultivate, but in the long run they are a
whole lot less expensive to feed and a lot safer for your fish.

Mayalauren@aol.com wrote:

> Has anyone obtained fry from this fish?
> What were the parameters?
> I think mine have spawned several times ( the female changed colour and
> disappeared for a couple of days), but nothing seems to come of it.
> pH 6, 82*, 30ppm. I feed blackworms, bbs and bloodworms.
> Any hints?
> Thanks
> Jason
>
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Apisto sp. aff. Agassizii ID?

by Mike & Diane Wise <apistowise/bewellnet.com>
Date: Wed, 24 Feb 1999
To: apisto/pudge.listbox.com

Fredrik,

Sorry, I should have answered earlier. The fish you have is one that Marco
Lacerda brought into the hobby in 1997. He called it A. sp. aff. gephyra Red-fin
Rio Xingu. It probably is more closely related to A. pulchra, however. If you
look closely, the lateral band ends in front of a caudal patch. It does not
extend continuously into the tail. It is the only known agassizii-complex fish
with this feature. Marco & I published an article on this fish in the ACA
Buntbarsche Bulletin last autumn.

Mike Wise

"Fredrik Nilsson A (QDT)" wrote:

> A week ago I brought home 3 males and 4 females of a wild caught apisto sp.
> that in the store was labeled "Apistogramma afanini". One of the males and
> two of the females are adults, the male being 55 mm SL and the females 40 mm
> SL.
>
> The fish are imported via the Check republic and I have no reference at all
> as to where they may come from, etc.
>
> I dumped them into a 250l aquarium with some phantom tetras and cories while
> setting up a new tank for them. Of course by now two females have spawned
> (saturday) and the original inhabitants of the tank are severely terrorized.
> I have never witnessed such aggression from apistos.
>
> They resemble A. agassizii very closely. In the ID worksheet in the Krib the
> answer is aga to allmost everything. The coloration of the dominant male is
> very close to the red agassizii on p.26 in Linke&Staeck. The younger males
> have a lot more blue in them. There are however some small things that
> differ from agassizii:
>
> 1. The caudal fins of the males are oval. Only on the adult male the caudal
> could be described as very slightly lanceolate.
> 2. On the adult females the dorsal fin has a red bordering.
> 3. The caudal fin of the females are slightly more truncate than on an
> agassizii female.
> 4. Breeding females always (as far as I have observed) show the full lateral
> band, not only the lateral spot as my agassizii females did.
>
> They spawned at very low hardness dGH=dKH<2, pH~6.
> Although the tank is planted there is not enough hiding places for such
> aggressive fish. It is interesting to observe though that one of the
> egg-guarding females allows a small female within her territory while
> viciously beating up any other fish that comes close, including the males.
> This smaller female is not in breeding coloration.
>
> I have some pictures waiting to be developed that I will put up somewhere on
> the web when I get them.
>
> Anyone with any experience with this fish? Could a better identification be
> made?
>
> Fredrik Nilsson
>
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