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24-Hour Light and Effect on Egg/Fry Survival

Contents:

  1. Nannacarra Anomala
    by Donald Nute <dnute/aisun1.ai.uga.edu> (Sun, 6 Oct 1996)
  2. fry in the dark
    by lisa wrischnik <wrisch/mendel.Berkeley.EDU> (Wed, 30 Oct 1996)
  3. fry in the dark
    by Chuck Filson <chuck/goodeid.com> (Wed, 30 Oct 1996)
  4. lights out
    by Mike & Diane Wise <apistowise/bewellnet.com> (Sat, 01 May 1999)
  5. Artificial Hatching of Ram Eggs
    by "Helen Burns" <helen.burns/bigwig.net> (Wed, 10 May 2000)
  6. Artificial Hatching of Ram Eggs
    by "gkadar" <gkadar/idirect.ca> (Wed, 10 May 2000)
  7. ...no subject...
    by Frauley/Elson <fraulels/minet.ca> (Tue, 01 Feb 2000)
  8. ...no subject...
    by WnyZman/aol.com (Tue, 1 Feb 2000)

Nannacarra Anomala

by Donald Nute <dnute/aisun1.ai.uga.edu>
Date: Sun, 6 Oct 1996
To: Apistogramma List <apisto/aquaria.net>

On Sat, 5 Oct 1996 Alimar-D-at-worldnet.att.net wrote:

> I have a breeding pair, (the male is beautiful) and I wonder if anyone 
> could help me.  Each time the eggs are eaten in my community tank.  The 
> female diligently guards, but other fish sneak around her in the night.  
> I have set up a 10 gallon and want to move the big piece of driftwood out 
> of the 55 gal to the 10 and I will keep the wood immersed during 
> transfer.  Will the eggs hatch without mom's help and fanning? And when 
> will the eggs hatch, what to feed, etc. 

I've been told that leaving the lights on overnight helps prevent other
fish from getting the eggs, but I've yet to have a chance to try it.

I incubated Apisto eggs artificially years ago. (I'm just now getting
back into Apistos.) I put them in about a gallon jar with a bit of
methylene blue and an airstone. The main problem is fungus. Any infertile
egg will probably fungus no matter what you do. You want to try to keep
the fungus on any bad eggs from killing the good eggs with its toxins.
Thus, the dye and the airstone. I set the airstone up so there was a
good current near the eggs. I never had large hatches this way, but I
did have some success. In a 10G, I would forget the dye an just try to
keep the water moving near the eggs.

I've never been able to breed anomala - don't know why. The books say
they are easy. But so far as I recall, mine never laid any eggs. Good
luck!

Don

------------------------------------------------------------------
Donald Nute
Professor and Head, Department of Philosophy        (706) 542-2823
Director, Artificial Intelligence Center            (706) 542-0358
The University of Georgia                       FAX (706) 543-2839
Athens, Georgia  30602, U.S.A       http://ai.uga.edu/faculty/nute


fry in the dark

by lisa wrischnik <wrisch/mendel.Berkeley.EDU>
Date: Wed, 30 Oct 1996
To: apisto/aquaria.net


Hi all,
Things have been too quiet, so I thought I would ask some questions.
A pair of my dwarves were acting as if they had spawned, and I 
finally saw mom with the fry Sunday morning. I like to let the 
parents have a few tries at raising the fry because I like watching
their parenting behavior, so I left the fry with mom. That night, I
turned off the tank lights as usual.

The next morning I turned on the lights to feed the fry and I could
only see about 5 or so, and they were scattered around the tank.
In the meantime, mom was frantically racing around the tank in
circles (looking,in my highly anthropomorphic opinion, very agitated).
The fry were very much on their own. I assumed all was lost, so I
caught up the fry that I could and went off to work.

That night, I came home and found mom guarding her pile of fry (I
assume she rounded them up during the day). Anyway, the upshot
of all this is that for the last two nights I've left the tank
light on all night, and I have found mom diligently guarding the
fry each morning.  I have lost fry in the past and was wondering
if I could have saved them by simply leaving the lights on so
mom wouldn't lose them in the dark. (I've also raised fry 
successfully when I turned off the lights every night, too [shrug])

I always assumed that mom stayed pretty much in one place 
guarding the fry at night, and that the fry stayed put as
well.  Am I missing something? Has anyone else noticed this?
(I was told to keep the lights on for my Rams when they spawned,
but I thought it was to protect the fry from the not-so-good
parents).

Thanks,
Lisa
wrisch-at-mendel.berkeley.edu


fry in the dark

by Chuck Filson <chuck/goodeid.com>
Date: Wed, 30 Oct 1996
To: apisto/aquaria.net

        You could just leave the lights on all night, or you could leave a
single light on in the room. This would be similar to moon light and I have
found that most cichlids  will guard their fry as long as they can see them.
Perhaps it was too dark that first night.

        This worked well for discus before and has also helped several other
dwarf cichlids that seemed to lose their fry when it was too dark.

Chuck


At 04:11 PM 10/30/96 -0800, lisa wrischnik wrote:
>
>Hi all,
>Things have been too quiet, so I thought I would ask some questions.
>A pair of my dwarves were acting as if they had spawned, and I 
>finally saw mom with the fry Sunday morning. I like to let the 
>parents have a few tries at raising the fry because I like watching
>their parenting behavior, so I left the fry with mom. That night, I
>turned off the tank lights as usual.
>
>The next morning I turned on the lights to feed the fry and I could
>only see about 5 or so, and they were scattered around the tank.
>In the meantime, mom was frantically racing around the tank in
>circles (looking,in my highly anthropomorphic opinion, very agitated).
>The fry were very much on their own. I assumed all was lost, so I
>caught up the fry that I could and went off to work.
>
>That night, I came home and found mom guarding her pile of fry (I
>assume she rounded them up during the day). Anyway, the upshot
>of all this is that for the last two nights I've left the tank
>light on all night, and I have found mom diligently guarding the
>fry each morning.  I have lost fry in the past and was wondering
>if I could have saved them by simply leaving the lights on so
>mom wouldn't lose them in the dark. (I've also raised fry 
>successfully when I turned off the lights every night, too [shrug])
>
>I always assumed that mom stayed pretty much in one place 
>guarding the fry at night, and that the fry stayed put as
>well.  Am I missing something? Has anyone else noticed this?
>(I was told to keep the lights on for my Rams when they spawned,
>but I thought it was to protect the fry from the not-so-good
>parents).
>
>Thanks,
>Lisa
>wrisch-at-mendel.berkeley.edu
>



lights out

by Mike & Diane Wise <apistowise/bewellnet.com>
Date: Sat, 01 May 1999
To: apisto/admin.listbox.com

Like Dr. Kadar's, most of my apistos seem to know when the lights go out and herd
their fry back to their cave before the lights turn off. Feeding apistos at night
is a waste of food. You are just attracting your pleco to the area.

Mike Wise

ruddigar@home.com wrote:

> Will a female apisto take her brood back to her cave each night, or
> will she herd them around the tank all night.  I am going to put a
> shrimp pellet in for the fry to nibble at during the night, but I was
> wondering where I should put it.
>
> Jason Miller
> Sherwood Park, AB
>
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
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> For instructions on how to subscribe or unsubscribe or get help,
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Artificial Hatching of Ram Eggs

by "Helen Burns" <helen.burns/bigwig.net>
Date: Wed, 10 May 2000
To: <apisto/majordomo.pobox.com>

I totally agree with Gary.  My fish house has no natural daylight, installed
on the ceiling I have an 8 watt light which is on when the tanks lights go
off via a time switch.  In addition to this when I have a spawning, in
particular if there are other species housed in the same tank, I place a
small wattage light on the cover glass.  By doing this it has saved many a
spawning and even free swimming fry from predation.
One example I had just the other week was when my pair of Heros severus had
3 day old fry and in this tank there are also housed some misc Corydoras
species and one female Steatocranus casuarus.  I had an unexpected spawning
in another tank and during the day I had to move the Severums extra light to
place on top of this other tank.  The following day all but a few of the
severum fry were gone.  It wasn't the parents who had a feast during the
night it was the other tankmates.
We have to give our cichlids all the help we can when they spawn and by
adding an extra light during darkness gives the pair the best possible
chance to defend their spawn/fry.  By the way I don't just have one extra
light for this purpose but in the above instance the others were in use in
other tanks.  I thought being that the Severums were large fish the fry
would be okay, I was wrong.
Helen
> I'm a night light user. I find with wild pairs and with fish in tanks
> with snails, it radically increases survival rates through the wriggler
> stage, and seems to help even with freeswimming fish. When the room
> lights snap off with the timer, the females haven't always taken the
> brood to safety.
> I don't know if the moon gets through in the wild, but to a degree, in a
> tank, we group hazards together more tightly than in the wild, so the
> extra bit of help seems useful.
> -Gary




Artificial Hatching of Ram Eggs

by "gkadar" <gkadar/idirect.ca>
Date: Wed, 10 May 2000
To: <apisto/majordomo.pobox.com>

John Wrote:
does mother nature leave a night light on, oh the moon i can hear it
now, but really under all that natural vegatation in the wild do you
think there is any light getting in there, i dont think so.

I never leave a night light on and have no problems with mom and dad
finding their fry.

______________---------______________-------------------

I don't think that this is really the point.  In their natural environment
these fish have about an hour while the sun is setting to get their
youngsters 'put to bed'.  In an aquarium the light just snaps off.  Also,
having lived in the Tropics, I can tell you that the starlight and the
moonlight are very strong.  Even during rainy season there isn't the static
cloud cover that we can have here.  Clouds pass over an area, torrential
rain comes down for 10 to 15 minutes and then the clouds are gone again for
a while.  It's totally different from what we experience here in North
America around 40 to 44 degrees latitude.  That's why one always 'walks with
an umbrella' down south.  One never knows when one will get dumped on and
even then, it's always for tremendous but short bursts. No gentle pitter
patter of raindrops that's for sure.

Gabriella
who never went looking for Keyhole cichlids or even guppies for the entire 2
1/2 years she spent in Trinidad. :(  Lost opportunities.  Did see kids
netting for guppies in drainage ditches though.






...no subject...

by Frauley/Elson <fraulels/minet.ca>
Date: Tue, 01 Feb 2000
To: apisto/majordomo.pobox.com

Raf Mols wrote:
> 
> As a beginner I would like to repeat my question if it is normal that
> apisto's spawn in absolute darkness.

Sorry Raf, sometimes when there are a bunch of messages, threads don't
get started.
My apistos generally spawn in light, but in dark places. I see no reason
why they wouldn't spawn in relative darkness. I have had them spawning
in room light, with no specific lighting on their tanks.
I'd be surprised if they spawned in night-time conditions though. For
leaf litter fish in forests, days are probably dark to begin with
though.
Gary




...no subject...

by WnyZman/aol.com
Date: Tue, 1 Feb 2000
To: apisto/majordomo.pobox.com

Raf Mols, I do sometimes find eggs in the morning that I don't believe were 
there the night before BUT my room is NEVER black. I visited the Plant Lady, 
Dorothy Reimer, quite a few years back and happened to enter her fishroom 
before her lights went on and she did have one single 15 watt bulb lighting 
the room. She explained that in nature it is very infrequent that there is no 
light at all and the sudden lighting of the room could frighten the fish. The 
moon sometimes gives off quite a bit of brightness so she has always had such 
a light. Since then I have been using such a light and it very easy to enter 
the room and still see you way around with and type of flashlight. Actually I 
think then is the best time to see the brilliant colors of all my fish with 
my pen-light.
    Don
    


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