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Misc. Plumbing

Contents:

  1. Vinyl Tubing (was How to use 802 as sump pump.)
    by kvk-at-kaos.sw.stratus.com (Ken Koellner) (3 Jan 92)
  2. Clamps?
    by shine-at-cbnewsh.cb.att.com (stephen.c.shine) (29 Jan 92)
  3. Clamps?
    by krogers-at-javelin.sim.es.com (K. Rogers) (Wed, 29 Jan 1992)
  4. Clamps?
    by chuck-at-pierre.mit.edu (Chuck Parsons) (29 Jan 92)
  5. PVC vs CPVC
    by dougcs-at-gnn.com (Douglas C. Skokna) (Sat, 29 Jun 1996)
  6. Bulkhead Fittings
    by "Joe Hackman" <jhackman/managedsolutions.net> (Mon, 26 Jun 2000)
  7. How much current is enough?
    by "Rubin, Michael" <mrubin/visa.com> (Tue, 14 Mar 2000)

Vinyl Tubing (was How to use 802 as sump pump.)

by kvk-at-kaos.sw.stratus.com (Ken Koellner)
Date: 3 Jan 92
Newsgroup: rec.aquaria

Vinyl Tubing is pretty stretchy so it's not hard to get it over the
end of a rigid tube like powerhead output or pvc fitting.  I've
actually been able to both 1/2" and 5/8" ID over the same type of
fitting by just being more perseverent with 1/2" and possible
employing Tube Trick One.

Tube Trick One: It gets softer when it's hotter (to the point of severe
		gooshiness).  Use the smallest ID that has a chance
		of fitting.  Heat it up (hair dryer, boiling water,
		heat gun-*, Bic lighter-*) and then force it on.  
		When it cools, you'll get a real tight fit.  Be
		careful holding the hot tubing.

*-I don't recommend using something that has the capability of heating
the tube to it's burning point (even though I do it all the time) and
I'm not responsible if you a) burn your finger, b) burn your house
down, c) cause any other damage.

-- 
"Lead, follow, or get the hell out of the way but do something!"-bumper sticker
All standard disclaimers apply; The above are my ideas, not my employer's.
Copyright (c) 1991 by Ken Koellner.  All Rights Reserved except electronic 
transmission over USENET and USENET-like, free-to-use computer networks.  


Clamps?

by shine-at-cbnewsh.cb.att.com (stephen.c.shine)
Date: 29 Jan 92
Newsgroup: alt.aquaria,rec.aquaria

In article patti-at-hosehead.hf.intel.com writes:
>Does anybody know if it's possible to buy plastic C-clamps?  I'm

I can't help you there, but if you get in a real bind you can 
easily make/fake your own.  Strips of acrylic can easily be
heated and bent into a C-clamp shape.  The acrylic can then
be tapped to accept a large nylon screw.  I was at TFP this 
past weekend where I saw that a significant percentage of their 
overflow toys used this principle to raise/lower the boxes
an inch or so.  Easy, neat, and efficient.

You could also give AIN Plastics a ring and see if they can
help you out.  Email me if you need their number; I just don't 
have it handy at the moment.

>patti-at-hosehead.hf.intel.com |  I don't speak for Intel, nor vice-versa.
-- 
Steve Shine
AT&T Bell Labs    (908)949-8517
att!hoqub!shine   att!cbnewsh!shine
My opinions, not my employers, not my fault, blah, blah, blah.


Clamps?

by krogers-at-javelin.sim.es.com (K. Rogers)
Date: Wed, 29 Jan 1992
Newsgroup: alt.aquaria,rec.aquaria

shine-at-cbnewsh.cb.att.com (stephen.c.shine) writes:

>In article patti-at-hosehead.hf.intel.com writes:
>>Does anybody know if it's possible to buy plastic C-clamps?  I'm
>
>I can't help you there, but if you get in a real bind you can 
>easily make/fake your own.  Strips of acrylic can easily be
>heated and bent into a C-clamp shape.  The acrylic can then
>be tapped to accept a large nylon screw.

Why bother to heat the piece into a C shape?  Why not just use two
pieces of acryllic and two screws?  Why bother to tap the pieces, even
if you do have a tap and die set (which I doubt Patti has.)  You can
just drill a couple of through holes in the two pieces of acryllic and
use a nylon bolt with a nylon nut.
-- 
Keith Rogers
Evans & Sutherland Computer Corp.
krogers-at-javelin.sim.es.com


Clamps?

by chuck-at-pierre.mit.edu (Chuck Parsons)
Date: 29 Jan 92
Newsgroup: alt.aquaria,rec.aquaria

In article <1992Jan29.165705.13347-at-javelin.sim.es.com>, krogers-at-javelin.sim.es.com           writes...
>shine-at-cbnewsh.cb.att.com (stephen.c.shine) writes:
> 
>>In article patti-at-hosehead.hf.intel.com writes:
>>>Does anybody know if it's possible to buy plastic C-clamps?  I'm
>>
>>I can't help you there, but if you get in a real bind you can 
>>easily make/fake your own.  Strips of acrylic can easily be
>>heated and bent into a C-clamp shape.  The acrylic can then
>>be tapped to accept a large nylon screw.
> 
>Why bother to heat the piece into a C shape?  Why not just use two
>pieces of acryllic and two screws?  Why bother to tap the pieces, even
>if you do have a tap and die set (which I doubt Patti has.)  You can
>just drill a couple of through holes in the two pieces of acryllic and
>use a nylon bolt with a nylon nut.
>-- 

  If you want to have something clamped to the side of the tank. Then
your solution needs a suction cup. If you bend the plastic and tap
then it can clip over the side of the tank, and the screw can be
used to tension it.

  If you bend thinish plastic right then you can some times use just the natural
springiness of the plexiglas and no screw.

  In general nuts are easier, but tapping looks better (IMHO). Also for
me, the tap was cheaper than the box of nylon nuts.


Regards, Chuck-at-mitlns.mit.edu


PVC vs CPVC

by dougcs-at-gnn.com (Douglas C. Skokna)
Date: Sat, 29 Jun 1996

Wright Huntley  wrote:

>The infrequent mention of the use of PVC, here, tends to make me 
>nervous. There is a special formulation of PVC called "CPVC" that is 
>always required for "potable water" applications. IMO, that's the only 
>kind we should consider for any extended contact with our tank water.

In a previous life, I managed the operation of a PVC plant and a PVC 
compound plant.  PVC is safe for drinking water provided that you buy (IN 
the USA) pipe and fittings marked, "NSF-pw."  This is pipe that is made 
from a compound that has passed tests of the National Sanitary Foundation 
that show it is safe for drinking water and presumably for aquatic critters 
too. This is usually the white pipe.  The grey pipe is usually not 
considered suitable for drinking water and should be avoided in the 
aquarium as well. 

The pipe compounds (the compound gets extruded to make pipe or injection 
molded to make the fittings) we made contained: PVC resin, CaCO3, TiO2, 
waxes, and a tin based stabilizer.  The tin stabilizer is the most toxic 
substance and does not migrate from the pipe to the water.  One NSF test is 
to test the pipe with acidic water and analyze the water for excessive 
levels of tin.  

As a precaution, you should always rinse the pipe and fittings before use 
as there are small residues of tin chlorides which form during the 
extrusion process and waxes on the surface of the pipe/fittings. These 
rinse off easily.

CPVC is a co-polymer made from vinyl chloride and vinylidene monomers and 
is stronger than PVC and uses similar compounding agents.  


Bulkhead Fittings

by "Joe Hackman" <jhackman/managedsolutions.net>
Date: Mon, 26 Jun 2000
To: <erik/thekrib.com>

Hi Erik, I was reading some articles on thekrib.com and came across your
bulkhead fitting article. I would have loved to have seen this article about
a month ago, because I would have borrowed your design. I actually found a
place that sells the fittings for less than 10x what they are worth and
thought I would share it with you. I ordered some small lifegard fittings
from them for my tank:

http://www.savko.com

They seem to have prices that are 1/3 what the local shops want for the
stuff.

Lot's of great info on your site as well! Keep up the good work.

Regards,

Joe Hackman
Managed Solutions
510.252.1831 xt. 102
Solutions to your Systems, Internet, and Networking Needs.


How much current is enough?

by "Rubin, Michael" <mrubin/visa.com>
Date: Tue, 14 Mar 2000

James Purchase wrote:

> Dupla recommended high circulation in The Optimum Aquarium, and to a 
> point it is a vaild argument, but there is such a thing as too much of a
good
> thing. Dupla recommends between 1-5 turnovers per hour (this is for
> circulation, not filtration). In Aquarium Ecology, a Supplementary
Approach
> (a booklet put out by the German manufacturer Tunze), they recommend 1-4
> turnovers per hour in a freshwater tank (and 4 - 10 in a saltwater tank).

Early on I spent some time playing with the amount of current that flows
through my heavily planted 50g.  I bought a bunch of PVC gate valves, some
tubing and cement, and built a contraption that allows me to route as much
or as little of my pump's capacity to the tank - the balance is diverted
back to the sump so only slight additional water head is created at the
pump.  The comfort zone, regardless of the delivery method (spray bar,
nozzle, etc.) seems to be at about 4 water changes per hour as near as I can
guess.  This flow rate allows CO2 to remain in solution but still circulates
the water enough so that no scum forms on the surface (I've got a trickle
filter).

> [I wonder what kind of shearing force would be created by using a "spray
> bar" to moderate the output of a powerful pump - I think it might increase
> the problem...]

There are spray bars and spray bars.  One member of our group in San
Francisco has gotten very adept at creating spray bars from landscape
irrigation tubing.  He can punch holes in the tubing in any number of subtle
ways that effect the way the water moves through and exits the bar.  I don't
think one can generalize about shear, but there is another huge advantage to
using a spray bar; you can place it whereever you want it.  My friend has
his spray bar at the water surface in the rear of his tank, with the water
spraying toward the BACK!  He claims the bar itself acts as a sort of
breakwater.  And if I remember correctly, Mr. Barr places his down low in
the back, sending water across the bottom, then up the front of the tank.
Both solutions work - both tanks are beautiful.

- --------------------------------
michael rubin 
mrubin@visa.com
1(650) 432-4685


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This page was last updated 30 July 2000