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Dragonfly Nymphs

Contents:

  1. Nymphs
    by "Darren J. Hanson" <djhanson/calweb.com> (Wed, 21 Oct 1998)
  2. Nymphs
    by "Helen Burns" <hlnburns/thefree.net> (Wed, 21 Oct 1998)
  3. Nymphs
    by plasticolor/guate.net (Wed, 21 Oct 1998)
  4. Aquatic Insects
    by Dorian McMillan <mcmilland/cofc.edu> (Tue, 08 Dec 1998)

Nymphs

by "Darren J. Hanson" <djhanson/calweb.com>
Date: Wed, 21 Oct 1998
To: apisto/majordomo.pobox.com

> A few weeks ago I added some new plants to one of my tanks. I just found what
> looks like some sort of nymph, approx. an inch long.
> Do these attack fish? How the hell do I get rid of them? If the nymph got in
> there, I bet there's leeches too...
> Jason
I had an experience once where I got a bag full of java moss, which I
found out the java moss came from an outside pool. I ended up with a
bunch of these nymphs and I was glad I decided to check the plant out in
a container of water before putting it in a tank with fish. And, yes,
most nymphs can be deadly to fry. I would keep an eye on the container
and when I would see one I would use long nosed tweezers to pull these
critters out and destroy them. (Usually down the toilet or in a bag for
the freezer.) I waited about a month before I was sure there were no
more critters in the moss than I put it in my tanks.

I don't know if this helps you or not.

Kaycy


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Nymphs

by "Helen Burns" <hlnburns/thefree.net>
Date: Wed, 21 Oct 1998
To: <apisto/majordomo.pobox.com>

Jason,
Very recently I encountered this beastie in one of my Killi tanks which is
heavily planted.  I knew I had fry in this tank (Pseudoepiplatys annulatus)
but when I removed the plants, apart from the two pairs of adults there were
no fry.  This is when I discovered the beast.  It was a good inch -and-half,
long body, pincers on face and end of tail.  The answer is Yes they do eat
fry and anything they can get a hold of.  I took it to my aquatic club and
they said it was a Damsel Nymph they can come in your plants or if you are
feeding live foods from say a pond..  My beast was thriving on the brine
shrimp I was feeding my fry and it in turn was eating the fry.  It was so
big I'm sure its next move would have been for my adult Rockets!
Helen

>A few weeks ago I added some new plants to one of my tanks. I just found
what
>looks like some sort of nymph, approx. an inch long.
>Do these attack fish? How the hell do I get rid of them? If the nymph got
in
>there, I bet there's leeches too...
>Jason
>



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Nymphs

by plasticolor/guate.net
Date: Wed, 21 Oct 1998
To: apisto/majordomo.pobox.com

At 02:32 p.m. 21/10/98 EDT, you wrote:
>A few weeks ago I added some new plants to one of my tanks. I just found what
>looks like some sort of nymph, approx. an inch long.
>Do these attack fish? How the hell do I get rid of them? If the nymph got in
>there, I bet there's leeches too...
>Jason

If you float your plants in a tall jar or bucket with an inch of dark
gravel and hang a strong light bulb above, most nymphs and leeches will
head for the bottom.  Forget worrying about the fry;  some dragonfly nymphs
will zap fish almost their own size.

Peter


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Aquatic Insects

by Dorian McMillan <mcmilland/cofc.edu>
Date: Tue, 08 Dec 1998

Hi Roger-

I told our entemologist about your question, and here is what I got from
him:  Unfortunately there are very few species of insects that spend their
entire life cycle in the water.  Most aquatic insects have some non-aquatic
(usually flying) life stage, which is important for reproduction.  In fact,
one hypothesis as to why insects have not invaded the marine environment is
that they can't do it ecologically--no avenue for dispersal.  The good news
is that lots of insects eat algae, especially filamentous algae.  One
species he suggested trying is the water boatman, pref. juvenile.  They may
not work for algae *control* because they do not eat the entire structure
but instead are piercers--that is, they suck out the cell contents (I
thought that was pretty neat).  He also suggested that you might try mayfly
larvae (Baetidae, Caenidae, or Siphloneuridae).  He said that you should be
cautious of using just any herbivorous bug as they could eat your plants
too!  Many of the pond species are likely to be predators, and some of
these (such as dragonfly larvae) might eat your fish.  Hope this is helpful!

Cheers!

Dorian McMillan
College of Charleston 
Home of the Cougars [sorry N.C.  ;-)  ]


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