You are at The Krib ->Fish/Animals [E-mail]

Rainbowfish

Contents:

  1. photo by George Booth
  2. Breeding Rainbows (How?)
    by oleg-at-netcom.com (Oleg Kiselev) (Tue, 15 Sep 92)
  3. [F],[Q] Rainbow fish
    by booth-at-lvld.hp.com () (6 Apr 1994)
  4. [F] Help Breeding Rainbows
    by booth-at-lvld.hp.com () (15 Jul 1994)
  5. Anyone know anything about Rainbowfish?
    by GWLANG-at-ccmail.Monsanto.com (Gary Lange) (2 Jun 1995)
  6. Rainbowfish Study Group Address
    by CaryHo-at-aol.com (Fri, 14 Jul 1995)

Breeding Rainbows (How?)

by oleg-at-netcom.com (Oleg Kiselev)
Date: Tue, 15 Sep 92
Newsgroup: rec.aquaria

In article <68216-at-hydra.gatech.EDU> gt7969a-at-prism.gatech.EDU (DEPUY) writes:
>I am interestad in breeding rainbows.  I would be interested in hearing
>any comments or suggestions.  

Get a book on fish breeding.  There is plenty of choices on the market and 
many are inexpensive.  See FAQ for suggestions.

>Topics include:  tank size needed,

Depends on the fish size.  A rough guideline is 5 gal per pair of 2" fish.
More space is usually better.

>substrate >needed?, 

Dark sand or gravel will work, but is not essential.

>lighting,

Usually not essential.  The normal tank and ambient lighting will be sufficient.

> special food, 

Live foods, especially high-protein foods like worms, will improve egg 
production. 

>demand for them (assuming I have any luck),

Depends.  The easy ones are easy and cheap.  The more difficult ones are 
often in less demand simply because there are fewer people who know about 
them, are interested in them and are willing to pay the price.

>and related ideas.  Thanks in advance.

Rainbows are bred pretty much like killies.  A yarn mop, either
floating or not depending on the species, is used a spawning substrate,
but just about any fine-leaf plant like Java Moss will do.  Mops are
easier to handle.  Many rainbow species's eggs take a few days to over
a week to develop and are relatively tought and immune to handling.  
They are usually water-incubated, but can be incubated on moist peat
for a period of time -- this allows to slow down the egg development and
to get the eggs from several days of spawning to happen at about the same
time.
-- 
Oleg Kiselev at home			...use the header to find the path


[F],[Q] Rainbow fish

by booth-at-lvld.hp.com ()
Date: 6 Apr 1994

Matthew John Latimer (mlatimer-at-uclink.berkeley.edu) wrote:
>       1.  Are they ok to have in pairs or are they much happier
> in a small school.   I wouldn't mind getting all the same kind, but
> it might be nice to have a little variety.

They seem to do much better in a larger school of 10 or more (in a large 
tank, of course).  Once the school gets above a critical mass", the
interactions become fascinating and they really seem to color up more
brightly. 

If you are interested in breeding, 2 males and 4 or 5 females are
the suggested optimum.  

> My question though is: do all varieties develop
> a bulging body with the head protruding like a beak when they reach
> adulthood.  I have seen M. boesmani that had adopted this shape.  They
> are still pretty, but I think I prefer the oval shape better.
> Specifically, do M. nigrans and M. parkinsoni adopt the bulging shape
> in adulthood? (I have seen both available locally)

I know M.parkinsoni do.  I think this is a "dominant male" attribute. 
We have had various species and have had fish with and without the
extreme bulging shape.  

>       3.  Are they jumpers?  

Absolutely. 

>       If you've kept rainbow fish and have any words of advice I'd
> appreciate anything you could tell me. 

The Rainbowfish Study Group, Inc.
---------------------------------

Dedicated to the study, preservation, etc, etc, of the Melanotaeniidae
family of fishes, better known as Australian and New Guinea
Rainbowfish.  Includes Melanotaenia, Glossilepsis, Chilatherina,
Pseudomugil and other species.

Membership includes a bi-monthly journal, "The Rainbow Times", with
articles, color photos (!), meeting announcements and ads for people
selling/trading/wanting eggs and fish.

USA and Canada - $10.00 per year
International  - $15.00 per year

The RSG is now offering an 85 page collection of reprints from "The
Rainbow Times".  Based on the table of contents, it looks like a must
for anyone interested in 'Bows.  $13.50.

Contact:

  Sherry Bresett-Taylor
  xxxx [address invalid -- see later article for updated info - editor]

=============================================================================
George L. Booth                      The Technology of Freshwater Plant Tanks 
booth-at-hplvec.lvld.hp.com             __        Aquatic Gardener's Association
Software Development Engineer       /  \  /\        Colorado Aquarium Society
Manufacturing Test Division      /\/    \/  \         Rainbowfish Study Group
Hewlett-Packard Company         /  \/\  /    \/\         "Modern Aquascaping"
Loveland, Colorado  _____utah__/    \ \/      \ \___me____________kansas_____
=============================================================================

[F] Help Breeding Rainbows

by booth-at-lvld.hp.com ()
Date: 15 Jul 1994
Newsgroup: rec.aquaria

KennyZ (kennyz-at-aol.com) wrote:
> I have a 38 gallon tank I would like to use to breed rainbows (either
> Glossolepis incisus or Melanotaenia splendida).  Has anyone successfully
> bred these before?  If so, could you give me some pointers.  Also, I find
> it difficult to find a female G. incisus (perhaps due to their drab
> color).  Can anyone suggest a place (ie: mail order) I could get one?

Yes and Yes.  

The Rainbowfish Study Group, Inc.
---------------------------------

Dedicated to the study, preservation, etc, etc, of the Melanotaeniidae
family of fishes, better known as Australian and New Guinea
Rainbowfish.  Includes Melanotaenia, Glossilepsis, Chilatherina,
Pseudomugil and other species.

Membership includes a bi-monthly journal, "The Rainbow Times", with
articles, color photos (!), meeting announcements and ads for people
selling/trading/wanting eggs and fish.

USA and Canada - $10.00 per year
International  - $15.00 per year

The RSG is offering an 85 page collection of reprints from "The Rainbow
Times".  This is a must for anyone interested in 'Bows.  $13.50.

Contact:

  Sherry Bresett-Taylor
  2651 Larkin Ave.
  Lakeport, NY  13032

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
George Booth                 | Specialist in Freshwater Plant Tank Technology
booth-at-hplvec.lvld.hp.com     | Keeper of Discus, Angelfish and Rainbowfish
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------



Anyone know anything about Rainbowfish?

by GWLANG-at-ccmail.Monsanto.com (Gary Lange)
Date: 2 Jun 1995
Newsgroup: rec.aquaria

In article <1995Jun1.215437.5355-at-lugb.latrobe.edu.au>, Richard Brown
<R.Brown-at-latrobe.edu.au> wrote:

> Perhaps the best way to start is to get hold of a copy of the book 
> "Rainbowfishes of Australia and Papua New Guinea" by Dr. Gerald R. Allen 
> and Norbert J. Cross. I'm not sure if it is still in print, but you 
> should be able to get it from a library. It is very comprehensive.

Certainly this book is a classic.  Unfortunately TFH has suggested that
they will never reprint it, it is sadly out of print.  You might find a
copy in one of those crummy fish stores (where nobody reads anyway!)  Or
you might wait for the next version that is due out by Dr. Allen from the
Tetra people.  Word has it that it will be out in August.  
You might be able to get a copy autographed in Pittsburgh during the Labor
Day weekend at the GPASI show & workshop.  Lots of good speakers including
Dr. Allen - Collecting rainbowfish in New Guinea & probably also a salt
water talk and another RSG sponsored speaker Peter Unmack, a native of Oz
who will be entertaining us with "Desert Fishes from Down Under".  If
you'd like more information on this show contact one of the organizers,
George Demko (412) 771-7913 he's from the group hosting the show.

> A lot of species are not that readily available, so possibly the best way 
> to obtain some of the more hard to get species would be through an 
> aquarium society, where you could get in contact with aquarists who 
> specialize in these fishes.

You'd be surprised at what is available for those that have taken the time
to enjoy these beautiful fishes.  They are not exactly beginner fishes but
if you have the basic knowledge of aquarium keeping they are fairly easy
to keep alive and thriving.  You can find more information through the
Rainbowfish Study Group ($10 US/yr for US & Canada) $15 for airmail. That
gets you 4 issues per year.  They usually contain at least one color
photograph, Fish & egg listings and sometimes color xeroxes depicting
several different species.  The next issue has a picture of Melanotaenia
praecox (the neon rainbowfish) on the cover as well as a really good
article by Peter Unmack dealing with other fishes native to Oz.
To join, send address, phone (area code) (and Email address) to: 
Sherry Taylor   171 Campbell Lane   Cookeville, TN  38501     
If you HAVE to have a membership form, E-mail me and I will send one.

> Personally, I like the Melanotaenia trifasciata group. They include some 
> large, spectacular fish, and are generally fairly hardy, long-lived and 
> easy to breed.

Currently some of our members are keeping several of the trifasciata
"tribes" including Goyder river (red), Coen River (yellow), Wonga Creek
(blue) Canoe Creek (green, pearlscale) as well as Wenlock river & Canoe
Creek.  All were intruduced to the world thanks to the efforts of the
ANGFA group <in Australia> that collected and distributed them to hobbyist
around the world.  They truly are beautiful fish.


Rainbowfish Study Group Address

by CaryHo-at-aol.com
Date: Fri, 14 Jul 1995

Hello Erik,

I really enjoy you web page The Krib. Its one of the best sites on the web.
I'ld also like to thank you for giving the Rainbow Study Group a plug. But,
one of the address listed for Sherry Taylor (our member chair) is her old
address. This is found under the breeding rainbows. 
Her correct address is Sherry Taylor, 171 Cambell Lane, Cooksville,
TN 38501. You do list the correct address in the writing by Gary Lange on the
page following. We at the RSG would be thankful if you could update the old
address for the new address.

Thanks
Cary Hostrawser 

Up to Fish/Animals <- The Krib
This page was last updated 29 October 1998