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brine shrimp

Contents:

  1. live brine shrimp: why so red lately?
    by sywang-at-whale.st.usm.edu (Shiao Y. Wang) (1 Jun 1994)
  2. Red Brine Shrimp
    by mstrawn-at-uswnvg.com (Mark M. Strawn) (3 Jun 94)
  3. Conclusion of Artemia pond
    by cassb-at-geocities.com (Bryan Cass) (Wed, 31 Aug 1994)
  4. Brine Shrimp
    by cassb-at-geocities.com (Bryan Cass) (Mon, 19 Sep 1994)
  5. brine shrimp
    by student-at-tmbl.gu.se (Mike Noreen) (Sun, 2 Apr 1995)
  6. Hatching Brine Shrimp
    by Philip Deitiker <Pdeitik-at-bcm.tmc.edu> (12 Jun 1995)
  7. Hatching Brine Shrimp
    by cbay-at-menken.NoSubdomain.NoDomain (Charles Bay) (Fri, 16 Jun 1995)
  8. hatching brine shrimp (why it doesn't work ?)
    by Philip Deitiker <Pdeitik-at-bcm.tmc.edu> (30 Jul 1995)
  9. hatching brine shrimp (why it doesn't work ?)
    by Ben Scorer <ben-at-benshome.demon.co.uk> (Sun, 30 Jul 1995)
  10. Shrimp egg shells
    by Wright Huntley <huntley/ix.netcom.com> (Thu, 02 Oct 1997)
  11. Shrimp eggs- Now a problem
    by "Darren J. Hanson" <djhanson/calweb.com> (Sat, 4 Oct 1997)
  12. Shrimp Eggs
    by "Darren J. Hanson" <djhanson/calweb.com> (Fri, 7 Nov 1997)
  13. enriching artemia
    by William Vannerson <William_Vannerson/ama-assn.org> (Thu, 30 Oct 1997)
  14. Decapsulated Brine Shrimp
    by "Maladorno, Dionigi \(DRUG;Nutley\)" <DIONIGI.MALADORNO/roche.com> (Thu, 26 Feb 1998)
  15. Altaspinosa Fry
    by "Darren J. Hanson" <djhanson/calweb.com> (Fri, 6 Mar 1998)
  16. baby brine methods
    by Erik Olson (Tue, 24 Feb 1998)
    (e-mail)
  17. Feeding Fry
    by Lilia Stepanova <ls691035/bcm.tmc.edu> (Tue, 11 Aug 1998)
  18. bbs and science
    by Phoenix1/t-online.de (Wilfred Teiser) (Tue, 15 Sep 1998)
  19. bbs and science
    by Mike Jacobs <mfjacobs/geocities.com> (Tue, 15 Sep 1998)
  20. Dividers and Spirulina
    by Doug Brown <debrown/kodak.com> (Wed, 16 Sep 1998)
  21. Dividers and Spirulina
    by Erik Olson <erik/thekrib.com> (Wed, 16 Sep 1998)
  22. Dividers and Spirulina
    by "Vinod Kutty" <VKUTTY/prodigy.net> (Tue, 15 Sep 1998)
  23. (yummies for the tummy) Artemia revolution question
    by richardb/cognos.UUCP (Richard Brosseau) (7 Feb 92)
  24. (LIVE FOOD) Re: (yummies for the tummy) Artemia revolution question
    by ()
  25. (LIVE FOOD) Re: (yummies for the tummy) Artemia revolution question
    by ()
  26. Green and Black Brine Shrimp?
    by oleg/netcom.com (Oleg Kiselev) (Thu, 28 Jan 1993)
  27. [FOOD] Brine shrimp eggs, was Re: Tubifex Worms
    by mattk/cbnewsl.cb.att.com (matthew.kaufman) (Wed, 12 Feb 1992)
  28. [FOOD] (food) Brine shrimp eggs, was Re: Tubifex Worms
    by ()
  29. [FOOD] (food) Brine shrimp eggs, was Re: Tubifex Worms
    by ()
  30. Murex shrimp
    by "Newman, L" <Lee_Newman/bc.sympatico.ca> (Mon, 04 Jan 1999)
  31. couple of questions
    by "Cory and Susanne Williamson" <webwill/infinet.net> (Tue, 11 May 1999)
  32. cyclop-eeze
    by Frauley/Elson <fraulels/minet.ca> (Sat, 01 Apr 2000)
  33. decapsulated brine shrimp eggs
    by "Matthijs Wachtmeester" <emwee/chello.nl> (Mon, 12 Jun 2000)
  34. brine shrimp
    by Tony Terceira <terceira/ride.ri.net> (Fri, 22 Dec 2000)
  35. Hatching Brine Shrimp
    by BigJohnW/webtv.net (John Wubbolt) (Thu, 28 Dec 2000)
  36. Hatching Brine Shrimp
    by "Mike" <mikeymeyer/sprintmail.com> (Wed, 27 Dec 2000)
  37. ram fry, sigh
    by GNLill/aol.com (Thu, 24 Jan 2002)

live brine shrimp: why so red lately?

by sywang-at-whale.st.usm.edu (Shiao Y. Wang)
Date: 1 Jun 1994
Newsgroup: alt.aquaria

Mark M. Strawn (mstrawn-at-nv2.uswnvg.com) wrote:
: >does anyone know why the live brine supply in the san francisco bay area
: >has been so red lately? are they dyeing the water to make the shrimp
: >more visible(and perhaps more attractive) for fish? 

The red color is due to the hemoglobin in the hemolymph (blood) of the
brine shrimp. It increases in response to low oxygen level or to greater
oxygen demand (your red blood cell number increases also with regular
aerobic exercise). During the warmer months of the year, any of the
following reasons can contribute to the increased hemoglobin content: 
1). rapid population growth -> less oxygen available for everyone;
2). warmer water temp -> lower oxygen solubility in the water;
3). warmer water temp -> greater metabolic activity -> greater oxygen demand.

Don't let a dealer fool you about red or brown being more nutritious. You
can have either red or brown brine shrimp that is more nutritious than the
other. Nutritional quality is related to the quality and availability of
food to the brine shrimp, not hemoglobin content. I must point out
however, that there can be coorelation among time of the year, water
temperature, oxygen level in the water, food availability to the brine
shrimp and the hemoglobin content. Just because a batch of brine shrimp is
red or brown doesn't automatically mean that they are either more or less
nutritious than the other.

Shiao Wang
University of Southern Mississippi


Red Brine Shrimp

by mstrawn-at-uswnvg.com (Mark M. Strawn)
Date: 3 Jun 94
Newsgroup: rec.aquaria

I was wondering about why the color of brine shrimp varied seasonally so
I called San Franciso Bay Brand and talked to one of their brine shrimp
experts. He said that when the salinity of the water increases the
amount of oxygen in the water decreases, when this occurs the brine
shrimp start to produce more hemoglobin in their tissue causing them to
turn red. He had some other interesting facts too:

1. Red brine shrimp lay eggs (cysts) instead of giving live birth like
the brown ones. This is probably because when the salinity increases it
may mean that their pond is drying out an in order to survive they need
to produces cysts that will survive until it rains again. 

2. Red brine shrimp are not as nutritious as the brown ones since they
come from an oxygen depleted environment that has less food in it for
them. 

3. It was not my imagination, the red ones do live longer in my
refrigerator because they can survive with less oxygen than the brown
ones.

He is sending me some printed material on this subject so if I find out
any other interesting brine-shrimp-facts I will post them.

Later,
Mark


Conclusion of Artemia pond

by cassb-at-geocities.com (Bryan Cass)
Date: Wed, 31 Aug 1994
Newsgroup: rec.aquaria

I posted a couple articles in July about setting up a brine shrimp
"pond" in my yard.  Here is what happened:

The first time, I made a brine mixture with 4 tsp. salt and 1 tsp.
Epsom salt per gallon of water.  This made a very weak brine of 
around 1.010 specific gravity.  I added a tablespoon of eggs to the
20 or so gallons of water in a 4'x4' container.  The water was about
4" deep.  The eggs hatched nicely in a few days and the pond was full
of Artemia in about a week.  The temp ranged from about 70-90F and I
had added some baking soda to buffer the pH to about 9.0.

However, apparently the water was not salty enough; after about 4 weeks,
when the shrimp were nearing adult size and starting to reproduce, some
predatory insect larvae ate ALL of the shrimp in the pond within a 
couple days.  The shrimp were disappearing and I thought they were just
dying, but when I found the insects, it was too late.

So I poured bleach into the pond to sterilize it and start over again.
The bleach killed everything *but* the insect larvae.  So I dumped the
water out and let the plastic dry.

Attempt number two:  I decided that the water needed to be more salty,
so the next day I read a SF Bay Brand pamphlet on how to keep adult
brine shrimp (geared to store owners who sell the live adults).  In 
it, they said to mix up saltwater with a specific gravity of 1.060(!).
I thought that was a little high, and decided 1.025-1.030 (slightly 
higher than average ocean water) was enough.  I bought a hydrometer 
and mixed up a new batch of saltwater and dumped in some more eggs.
Well, after three weeks, there were about 3 brine shrimp alive in
there, so I gave up.  It seems like more trouble than it's worth to
try to raise brine shrimp in an outdoor setting.

Conclusion:  I have great success in hatching Artemia in a hatching 
cone and feeding the nauplii to baby fish.  Raising the shrimp to
adult size is another story and takes more knowledge (or determination)
than I have.  I'll stick to white worm cultures, skimming ponds for 
mosquito larvae, catching flying insects, and frozen fish foods.
 
-- 
Bryan Cass     cassb-at-geocities.com    Burlington, VT, USA
The opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and not
necessarily those of his employer.


Brine Shrimp

by cassb-at-geocities.com (Bryan Cass)
Date: Mon, 19 Sep 1994
Newsgroup: alt.aquaria,rec.aquaria

In article <1994Sep18.030512.2036-at-lamont.ldgo.columbia.edu>,
Peter Bellin <7706-at-mneuxg.uucp> wrote:
>	I'm looking for information on Brine Shrimp.  Anything you can 
>tell me would be helpful.  E-mail me at 7706-at-mne.net or leave response in 
>alt.aquaria or rec.aquaria.  Thanks
>

Ok, you asked for it!  I am the self-proclaimed brine shrimp expert :-).
I have posted the complete instructions for hatching brine shrimp before
and asked that it be put into the FAQ.  I don't know if it's there or 
not so I'll post it again:

 
...the following excerpt from the
"Guide to the Brine Shrimp Artemia", (c) 1987-San Francisco Bay Brand,
Inc. without their permission (the phone number printed in the guide
does not work).  Please put this in the FAQ (if it's not illegal).


The Ingredients:

1. High quality San Francisco or Great Salt Lake cysts.

2. Aquarium or rock salt.

3. Epsom salt.

4. A cone hatchery. (We recommend the San Francisco Bay Brand Hatchery,
hatching cone kit item #1000WO) [of course!]

5. A small airpump.

6. A light source.


Necessities for a Good Hatch:

1. CLEAN HATCHING CONE.  Start with a well washed and rinsed hatching
container...SCRUB IT!!!  THE SINGLE BIGGEST REASON FOR POOR HATCH
RESULTS ARE DUE TO A DIRTY HATCHING CONE.

2. CORRECT TEMPERATURE.  The water should be kept between 75F to 86F
(24C to 30C) and the cysts should hatch in 24 to 36 hours.  The higher
the temperature, the shorter the hatch time.  Temperatures in excess of
90F (32C) cause the hatch to stop (arrest) and will not proceed until
the temperature is brought within the correct parameters.

3. QUANTITY OF CYSTS IN PROPORTION TO WATER.  The maximum should be no
more than 5 grams of cysts per liter of water (roughly one teaspoon per
quart).

4. PROCEDURE!!!
   a. Place one liter of tapwater in hatching container and turn on air
      supply.
   b. Add correct amount of cysts for you needs. [I use about 1/2 tsp]
   c. Direct a strong light towards the hatching cone.  It is extremely
      important to illuminate cysts during one to two hour rehydration
      period in fresh water.  Full illumination during the entire
      hatching period is fine.  A 100 watt bulb about 8 inches away is
      sufficient.
   d. pH should be above 7.5.  Low pH will adversely affect the hatch.
      If necessary, add 1 gram (1/4 tsp) of sodium bicarbonate per liter
      of water to buffer water to pH 8-9.
   e. After one to two hour rehydration period, add about 5 grams of
      salt per liter and 1.5 grams epsom salt per liter.  This is
      approximately one teaspoon salt and 1/4 teaspoon epsom salt.
   f. Keep all cysts in suspension by aeration.
   g. After desired hatching time is reached, turn off air supply and
      direct a light towards the bottom of the hatching container.
      Nauplii of all commercially available strains are phototactic and
      will congregate towards the light where they can be siphoned off.
   h. Maximum energetic and caloric content of the nauplii is utilized
      when harvested prior to moulting into the second and third instars
      (to meet this criteria, nauplii should be harvested within 6 hours
      of hatching).  At 30C (86F) most cysts, provided other criteria
      are met, should be harvested at 24 hours.  If maximum yield is
      desired without regard to energy content, harvesting should take
      place between 36-48 hours.
   i. To collect the nauplii, turn off the air and let them settle for
      5-10 minutes; by that time the neck of the cone should be full of
      nauplii.  The hatched empty cysts will float to the surface of the
      water.
   j. Remove the airline tube connected to the air pump and drain
      nauplii and water into a fine mesh net.
   k. Wash both net and nauplii free of salt by placing under a gentle
      flow of fresh cold water from the faucet.  Be sure to wash all
      parts of net free of salt.  This washing will collect the nauplii
      at the bottom of the net and you may then feed them to your fish.
      You might find that an eyedropper will be very helpful in feeding
      your newly hatched nauplii.
   l. The nauplii will not survive more than a few hours in freshwater,
      so do not feed more at one time than the young fish fry will
      consume in that period.
   m. The salt water mix used to hatch the cysts should not be used
      again.  Scrub the hatching cone with a sponge and detergent,
      RINSE WELL, and now you're ready to set up a new hatch.

5. STORING ARTEMIA CYSTS.  When properly care for, cysts have remained
viable for many years!  They should be kept cool and dry and if possible
not subjected to high humid conditions.  They are kept best in a tightly
closed, dry and clean container.  Refrigeration of open containers is
also a good method for storage, as long as it is remembered to allow the
cysts to return to room temperature slowly (2-3 days) before you try to
hatch them.  San Francisco Bay Brand, Inc. guarantees that its cysts
remain viable for at least two years if properly stored in their
original, unopened container.


(end of excerpt)

The amount of brine shrimp I get in one hatching is usually way too much
for one feeding.  So, to preserve the energy content of the food, I use
an eyedropper to put the shrimp into compartments of an ice cube tray
(or similar thing) and then fill each compartment with fresh water.
Then, to feed the fry, just drop a cube into the tank.  The frozen
shrimp will slowly melt and fall through the tank, feeding the fish in
the process.

Bryan


-- 
Bryan Cass     cassb-at-geocities.com    Burlington, VT, USA
The opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and not
necessarily those of his employer.


brine shrimp

by student-at-tmbl.gu.se (Mike Noreen)
Date: Sun, 2 Apr 1995
Newsgroup: alt.aquaria

In article <1995Mar26.193544.36354-at-ac.dal.ca>
sgillies-at-is.dal.ca (Sarah Rebecca Gillies) writes:

> I have been raising brine shrimp for my salt water tank but I would like 
> to know how to grow the little beauties in to adults.  What do I feed 
> them?  How lokng does this take?  Can i use my spare 10 gallon tank to 
> grow them bigger?

Brine shrimp are planctonic filter-feeders. They are easy to grow into
adult by feeding them very fine (liquid) foodstuffs. Best is probably
some kind of micro plancton replacement, but its unnecessarily
expensive. Green water or a dilute sludge of brewer yeast will work
just as well. They grow very rapidly, and will reach full length in a
month or two (at which time they're about 2cm long).

Some brine-shrimp trivia:

The scientific name ISN'T Artemia salina. That species was described
from coastal lagoons in Britain, and is believed extinct. The species
most commonly grown is Artemia californica.

The nutritional value of Artemia nauplii (larvae), as well as the size
of the nauplii and the proportion of eggs which hatch is totally
dependent on the nutritional value of the parent. A poorly fed parent
produces low-quality eggs. That's a real problem in industrial fish
breeding, since the quality of the eggs vary with their place of
origin.

Artemia eggs can be de-cysted (the shell removed) with hypochloride
(bleach). This increases the nutritional value, removes bacteria, and
the final product is much smaller than the hatched nauplius.

Artemia is one very few species which totally lack natural defences
against predators. That's why they're confined to very hostile
environments like salt lakes, and also why they make such excellent
feed...

Atleast some species reproduce parthenogenetically - one Artemia can
become many...

The cysts (eggs) are extremely durable when dehydrated. They can
withstand vacuum, temperature higher than 100 degrees centigrade, and
lower than that of liquid nitrogen.


Hatching Brine Shrimp

by Philip Deitiker <Pdeitik-at-bcm.tmc.edu>
Date: 12 Jun 1995
Newsgroup: alt.aquaria,alt.aquaria.killies,rec.aquaria,sci.aquaria

I use a champagne flute glass with a light set up underneath the glass 
(large scale). On a small scale a test tube would do. The brine shrimp 
will swim down faster than the eggs will sink, and their swimming 
activity pushes the eggs up, anyway. Then I use a siphon tube "purged" to 
suck the hatclings up. This works better because when the brine shrimp 
try to swim up they increase the weight of the water around them creating 
a down current. By putting the light under the glass the swimming 
direction and anticipated current are in the same direction. 

  I do things somewhat differently than you though I do the shrimp on a 
large scale, purify them and feed them (1 hr) on a large scale. Then 
concentrate by the method listed, put them in clean salt water. Then I 
put them in a shallow flat bootom bowl (w/lid) with about 1/8 inch water 
on top and put them in the fridge (temp needs to be at or above 4'C), and 
they are good for 2 to 4 days. This is much better than growing up brine 
shrimp 3 times per day.


Philip



Hatching Brine Shrimp

by cbay-at-menken.NoSubdomain.NoDomain (Charles Bay)
Date: Fri, 16 Jun 1995
Newsgroup: rec.aquaria


Ok, I avoided commenting as long as possible.  I've been reading
about some really good brine shrimp hatching techniques, a couple
of which I wrote down and plan on trying.  I've bought several
kinds of kits and tried several DIY systems over the years, but
one has been (by far) the best.

BTW, it was the cheapest one also.

A few years ago I read a small paragraph in the back of AFM that
described the following.  I didn't believe it, tried it, and
the darn thing worked.  It's what I use today.

Get a regular 1-gallon plastic milk jug (the kind with the plastic
handle that is a part of the jug).  Make sure the jug has a
screw-on cap, not a press-on cap.

Cut off the bottom of the jug.  With the jug upside down, you
now have a big container with a narrow bottom.

Poke a hole through the cap just large enough for airline tubing.
Force the airline tubing through the hole, which leaves a
water-tight seal.  I used to use an air stone, but don't anymore.
If you're having trouble making the watertight seal (it's not hard),
you can insert an airstone or hard plastic tubing into the airline 
tubing, which widens the tubing, making a better seal against the 
cap.

You need to support the upside-down milk jug, so you may want to 
put it in a bowl.   I use a small (6" diameter) glass bowl.  The 
bowl never holds water, it just supports the jug.

Fill the jug with your salt solution to 1" ABOVE the top of the milk 
jug handle.

Turn your air on, and add your brine shrimp eggs to the main body of
the jug.

   *************************************************************
  *       -----------> NOW THE MAGIC PART <------------         *
  *            (Don't forget to say "Abracadabra".              *
  *  I used to say "Hocus Pocus", but it didn't work as well.)  *
   *************************************************************

After a day or so when the water evaporates, ALL THE SHELLS WILL 
COLLECT IN THE MILK JUG HANDLE.  This process is complete when the 
water level in the jug drops below the top of the handle.  The shells
will stay in the handle of the jug, no matter how low the water level
goes from shrimp extraction or evaporation.  The little briney 
critters will be swimming around in the large open area of the jug, 
and you can simply extract them (yes, go ahead and use the flashlight 
to attract them).  Also, you can take the airline tubing off your 
pump, and after a minute or two, all the critters will settle on the 
bottom (or attract them there with the flashlight).  If you don't have 
an airstone, you can just use the airline tubing to siphon the critters 
into another tank or rearing facility.  Actually, you don't even need 
to begin the siphon because the tubing is at the bottom of the jug 
already and gravity feed will dump the critters into another tank for 
you.

   START THE CULTURE                       12-24 HOURS LATER
|                      |               |                      |
|                      |               |                      |
|                      |               |                      |
|                      |               |                      |
|~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~|<--water level |                      |
|            o      _  |     \         |                   _  |
|    brine shrimp  / | |      \------->|~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~/ |~|
 \  o    eggs     / / /                 \  brine shrimp  / /o/
  \       o      / / /                   \              / /o/ 
   \            | / /                     \    x       | /o/<--\
    \   o    o   - /                       \      x  x  -o/     \
      \          /                           \  x   x   /     brine shrimp
        \__||__/                               \__||__/          shells
         |____|                                 |____|
           ||                                     ||
           ||                                     ||
           ||                                     ||
            \\ <--- airline tubing (to pump) ----> \\
                 

It's magic.  It's incredible.  It's cheap.  It's the easiest I've
ever done, with the best success in hatching (although I'm going
to try some of the recent hatching posts to see if I still like
this one the best).  Although your mileage may vary, it has worked
for me 100% of the time.  Of course, I happen to have an Enchanted
Milk Jug that I re-use.   

BTW, the rate of evaporation depends on your climate.  Figure out
how long it takes to evaporate water in your area, and fill that
much water ABOVE the milk jug handle to time with the complete
hatching of all your eggs.  I'm in a pretty arid climate (Colorado,
USA), so I can easily lose 1" overnight with aeration.  I just
marked a spot on the jug that I fill to every time.

I wish I could say this idea was mine, but I read it in AFM several
years ago.  It's a secret, though, so don't tell anyone.  :-)


--charley
cbay-at-lookout.ecte.uswc.uswest.com



hatching brine shrimp (why it doesn't work ?)

by Philip Deitiker <Pdeitik-at-bcm.tmc.edu>
Date: 30 Jul 1995
Newsgroup: sci.aquaria

Try This

  1/2 gallon salt water (instant ocean), in glass pickle jar
  Aerate for at least 30 min if salt sol. is fresh.
  Add enough KMNO4 to purple the water (just beyond pink).
  Add 1 - 2 tablespons of Brine shrimp eggs.
  Small air pump with good diffuser, all the way to the bottom.
  _TEMPERATURE_ keep less than 85'C (82'C is best), the lower the temp
  the longer the incubation time, but they still hatch.
  Small light (15 to 25 watt) point directly at bottle (but not too close
     because of of overheating problem)
  As soon as they hatch harvest them away from the hatch media.

Incubation times (estimated) 
  16 hours aT 84'C
  20 hours at 80'C
  24 hours at 75'C

Philip


From alt.aquaria Sun Jul 30 22:28:53 1995

hatching brine shrimp (why it doesn't work ?)

by Ben Scorer <ben-at-benshome.demon.co.uk>
Date: Sun, 30 Jul 1995
Newsgroup: alt.aquaria

I keep the temperature at 80F, i put .25 tspoon of eggs in a pint of 
water, which has 2.5 tablespoons of salt in

-- 
------------------------------------------------------------------
| <><>o<><> Ben Scorer : EMail ben-at-benshome.demon.co.uk <><>o<><>|
------------------------------------------------------------------



Shrimp egg shells

by Wright Huntley <huntley/ix.netcom.com>
Date: Thu, 02 Oct 1997
To: apisto/majordomo.pobox.com

IDMiamiBob-at-aol.com wrote:
> =

> Help!
>     I am looking for the technique that removes the shells from brine s=
hrimp
> eggs before hatching.  I thought it was to soak them in a 2.875% sodium=

> hypochorite solution for six minutes, but that's not working.
> Also, can I do a bunch at once and then use them as I need them?
> Thanks in advance
> Bob Dixon

Hi Bob,

First you must wet the eggs for up to 30 minutes in fresh water.

How are you calculating that concentration? Most recipes I know call for
using the stuff right out of the Chlorox bottle, without diluting
further. It's already down to just over 5% strength when very fresh.

IDK if this is your problem. All I can do is ask.

I believe there is a good, reliable dechorinating recipe at the AKA web
site. (www.aka.org).

Good luck,

Wright


-- =

Wright Huntley Fremont CA, USA, 510 494-8679 huntley-at-ix.netcom.com
=93Live free or die.=94

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Shrimp eggs- Now a problem

by "Darren J. Hanson" <djhanson/calweb.com>
Date: Sat, 4 Oct 1997
To: apisto/majordomo.pobox.com

At 12:54 AM 10/4/97 -0400, IDMiamiBob-at-aol.com wrote:
>Thanks, folks.  I got the recipe.  But, Man!! I don't have that kind of time
>every day.  Can I do up a whole bunch at once, then dry them out until
>needed?  
Unfortunately I don't know of a good way to re-dehydrate artemia cysts at
home. The only descriptions I've ever heard of it being done were in
commercial settings.

>A store back in western NY used to sell decapsulated eggs that had
>been prepared and packaged commercially at a very hefty price.  
I too have seen small vials of deencapsulated artemia cysts, but at what I
consider astronomical prices. Now while I feel I've come into this
conversation in the middle, I wonder why you don't just hatch your brine
shrimp while still in the cysts? With a high quality product 90% or even
more will hatch out in as little as 18 hours depending on salinity, pH and
temperature. With careful siphoning, unhatched and empty cysts should not be
a significant problem.

>It should be doable if some company was wholesaling them.  Any ideas?
The only company I've found selling wholesale quantities are selling
deencapsulated junk grade artemia cysts. These are 100% edible as is with
12% more calories and a third more protein because none of the initial
energy supply has been consumed/converted/wasted by a hatching nauplii.
Because these are junk grade cysts, 50% or even less would hatch if you
attempted to do so. Not the same thing, after all they don't move and jerk
in the water column but they also don't die off or choke fry on an unhatched
cysts either. The supplier I found sells in 11 kg lots, but I could break
out individual 500 gram cans and reship them anywhere in the US priority
mail for $20 including tax and shipping charges. Oh, and if anybody is
thinking of going into the deencapsulated brine shrimp business, they'll
ship a pallet load (a little over 7 tonnes!) for only $8.90/lb plus shipping
and handling!

They've also got a "brine shrimp flake" that's two parts brine shrimp : one
part freshwater shrimp (gamaris sp.) : one part assorted vitamin & mineral
suppliments, binders and fillers. Sounds wonderful but they want $60 for a 5
pound bucket and that's BEFORE shipping! <sigh> If I could just hit the
lottery.....

-- dj

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Shrimp Eggs

by "Darren J. Hanson" <djhanson/calweb.com>
Date: Fri, 7 Nov 1997

In Aquatic Plants Digest  V2 #1063, Harold Wong <hgw-at-math.ucla.edu> wrote:

>Here's an odd question concerning Brine Shrimp. Anybody know how the
>eggs are harvested? Especially if you're getting them from salt lakes.

>From description by David Kawahigashi (Director of Research, San Francisco
Bay Brand), the cysts form large floating rafts upon the surface of the lake
(and also in the various inlets of San Francisco Bay). There is fierce
competition to harvest the cysts so when a batch is sighted, the race is on
to get to it first and claim it. At that point, harvesting the cysts
procedes similar to cleaning up an oil spill complete with booms and
vacuuming up the cysts/water. When one of the collection vessels is full, it
transfers its cargo to shore and goes back out for more. The cysts are than
transported to a facility where they are rinsed of excess salt and dried.
Portions of each batch are then tested to determine hatching rate at which
point they are sorted in various grades with the worst grades being used for
flake foods or dencapsulated for use as a dry food in the aquaculture industry.

The above is a vast simplification of a portion of his 2 hour lecture, but
gives the basics fairly well. Also, the artemia native to San Francisco Bay
are a different species than those from the Great Salt Lake. I forget which
is the larger of the two though.

- -- dj


enriching artemia

by William Vannerson <William_Vannerson/ama-assn.org>
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 1997
To: KillieTalk/AKA.Org, CICHLID/LISTSERV.UH.EDU, apisto/majordomo.pobox.com,

I am fowarding a reply from Eric Lund to several lists in order
to share some real valuable info on supplimenting BBS from
the live food list.  Thanks for the help, Eric.

=====================================

Re: Artemia enrichment with essential fatty acid emulsions.

>>>You CAN do this at home.<<

Bill V. wrote:
>
>Could you expand on this a bit?  Like ....
>
>Do you put the emulsion in the hatching solution with the
>cysts or after they hatch?
>
>How long after the BBS hatch do you harvest?
>

I just went down to the lab and asked the post-doc, Dr. Moti
Harel, for a
few specifics on this.  Here's a quick synopsis:

1) When do I add the stuff?

As you all know, hatching times for brine shrimp are
temperature-dependent.
Post-hatch development is also temperature dependent, so
all times given
here are approximate.  Artemia reach instar 2 (when they can
begin feeding)
at about 6 hours after hatching. If you look at artemia with a
good hand
lens you can tell when they have molted. Moti suggests
dechorionating your
Artemia eggs if you are going to do enrichment since the
hatch rate will be
a bit better and it takes 16 hours for them to hatch under
standard
conditions relative to 24 hours for regular eggs.  Assuming
you don't
dechorionate your eggs and they hatch under your conditions
in 24 hours add
Selcon (or equivilent) at 30 hours after starting the shrimp.

2)  How much of the stuff do I add?

How much do you add? I can't say for sure.  The amount to
add will vary
with both the amount of eggs you hatch and the lipid/water
ratio of the
product used.  The laboratory I work in is currently evaluating
different
fatty acid combinations in the phospholipids used for the
emulsions as well
as feeding doses and I am not at liberty to discuss specifics. 
I have to
believe that existing products on the market give
recommended dosages in
their instructions.

3)  When do I harvest the Artemia?

Maximum nutritional enrichment will have occured by
approximately 16 hours
after feeding (this is temperature dependent, however).  The
commercial
products used in aquaculture recommend 24 hours post
feeding for harvest.

4)  How long are the enriched Artemia good for?

You can store the enriched Artemia in a refrigerator for up to
3 days after
enrichment.  Refrigeration slows their metabolism way down
and prevents
them from losing too much of their nutritional value.  I believe
that
commercial breeders aerate the Artemia during cold storage. 
You may want
to run this by your spouse before perminently installing an air
pump in the
crisper section of your refrigerator at home ... :-)

5) Can I use lipid emulsions to enrich other foods?

Yes.  There are 2 ways to do this.  The first is to feed the
stuff to foods
that can feed on particles in water.  For example, I'd guess
that
blackworms would eat it, but Drosophila would probably be a
poor choice.
The other way to do it is to dunk the food items in the
solution just prior
to feeding.  The emulsion will stick to the food item and be
ingested along
with the food by your fish -- think of it like the chocolate
coating on an
icecream bar.  This is analogous to the way Herp keepers
give nutritional
supplements to their critters.

6)  What are the symptoms of essential fatty acid deficiency?

The essential fatty acid endproduct, DHA, is an important
component of cell
membranes in retinal tissue (eyes), neural tissue and cardiac
tissue.
Deficiency symptoms include:

Sudden fright syndome:  fish (usually juveniles) go into shock
or twitch
convulsively when frightened.

Poor visual accuity:  reduced ability to locate prey.

worn fins

poor growth rates

poor egg viability

high mortality rates under stressful conditions (ie: shipping)

Note that all of these symptoms can be caused by things
other than
essential fatty acid deficiency. IMHO essential fatty acid
deficiency is
not a problem with most killies fed a varied diet.  It is
possible,
however, that supplementation with a lipid emulsion may
increase growth
rates, fecundity and fry survivorship.  So, if you are having
problems
raising particular species it may be worth a try.  For those
trying to
breed reef critters such as anemone fish, gobies and blennies
artemia
enrichment is essential for success unless one raises marine
rotifers as a
larval food instead.
- --------------------------------------------------------------

I hope this proves of use to some of you.

Regards,

Eric Lund

lund-at-umbi.umd.edu

P.S.  Feel free to forward this to appropriate lists (ex:
livefoods)

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Decapsulated Brine Shrimp

by "Maladorno, Dionigi \(DRUG;Nutley\)" <DIONIGI.MALADORNO/roche.com>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 1998
To: "'apisto/majordomo.pobox.com'" <apisto/majordomo.pobox.com>

 Erik Olson <(e-mail)>
Wrote: <<<<<<
We bought one bottle of "shelless" type, and will try it soon... also
interested in any "tips" you may have on this one.>>>>>>


and Leo Reinhard wrote:
<<<<<
I found an article entitled " Decapsulation of Artemia Cysts " at the
web
site of San Francisco Bay Brand Inc.If anyone is interested , their URL
is
www.sfbb.com/>>>>>>



I have been decapsulating brine shrimp eggs for a few months now, with
very good results.
I followed the instructions for the topless BBS method found at:

http://www.trakkerinc.com/tropfish/tf06/tf0609.htm

I just duplicate the water and bleach amount, to be able to use a batch
of
one tablespoon of eggs, instead of the suggested one teaspoon.
A cheap, unscented bleach works just fine. It takes much less time than
I thought.
After decapsulation and rinsing, I store the eggs in a saturated salt
solution, obtaining
my own "Artemia Revolution" formulation. A tablespoon of decapsulated
eggs in a 
re-cycled Artemia Revolution bottle (the larger size) lasts for more
than a month, at the 
daily seeding rate of ~15 drops in a 0.5 liter water bottle. Enough to
feed 3-4 small tanks 
once (with powdered food supplements for another 1-2 feedings/day).
Another advantage (besides cost) is that the Artemia revolution cysts
produce quite large
larvae, while I decapsulate Salt Lake cysts, which produce much smaller
BBS.


Dionigi Maladorno


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Altaspinosa Fry

by "Darren J. Hanson" <djhanson/calweb.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 1998
To: apisto/majordomo.pobox.com

> How about large brine shrimp for the adults? I've been told they have
> very little nutritional value. They sure do like em! 

The problem is that the shrimp itself is mostly undigestible shell and
water. 

What provides the nutrition with baby brine is the yolk sack. (And that's
why the deencapsulated artemia cysts we use give such good results.
None of that energy source has been used by the shrimp yet so it's all
available for the fish!)

Live adult brine shrimp, at normal temperatures, can completely fill/empty
their gut in approximately 2 hours. (personal communication with David
Kawahigashi, Director of Research, San Francisco Bay Brand) That
means if it's been more than 2 hours from the time the shrimp last ate until
you feed them to your fish, you aren't really feeding your fish much at all.
(Hint: Most stores don't feed their shrimp.) It is possible to feed shrimp at
home, however. They are a non-discriminatory filter feeder which means
anything in the water with a particle size of 30 microns or less will
packed into their gut -- food, spirulina, antibiotics, oils, vitamins, or other
enrichments. (personal communication D. Kawahigashi) 

The simplest way to accomplish this is to put your shrimp into a brine
solution (2x sea water is about right) and add a solution of powdered fry
food in water or a commercial liquid-fry food. After the water clears,
you'll want to rinse the shrimp and place them in fresh water and keep it
as cool as possible without freezing. The cool temperatures will slow
down their metabolism and keep them from expelling what they just ate.

If you choose to use frozen shrimp, be careful with what you buy. After
touring San Francisco Bay Brand's facility and seeing how they use a
cryogenic system with liquid nitrogen to flash freeze their shrimp, I'm
very impressed with their quality. (They actually take them from the
cryogenic system to an industrial walk-in freezer to WARM UP enough to
be safely handled!) Slower freezing allows ice crystals to form which
tear up the individual cells in the shrimp/worm/what have you. Try
thawing some of your favorite frozen fish food out some time. When it's
thawed, rinse away the liquid. What's left, is all that's left for your fish to
eat. All the part you rinsed away just fouls the water and promotes algae
growth and high ammonia/nitrite/nitrate levels.

San Francisco Bay Brand has a frozen baby brine and at least 2
different frozen enriched adult brine products in their line. I highly
recommend them all. (And I'm not getting paid to say that either.)

-- dj


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baby brine methods

by Erik Olson (e-mail)
Date: Tue, 24 Feb 1998
To: apisto/majordomo.pobox.com

On Tue, 24 Feb 1998, Steven J. Waldron wrote:

> Hi folks,
> My method for hatching out/collecting baby brine is far from perfect.
> Though I try my best (concentrate the brine with a light source, try to
> separate the shrimp/cysts in freshwater prior to feeding), I end up with a
> lot of cysts in my aquariums. I'd love to hear suggestions for a "clean"
> method for rearing brine. Also interested in hearing results with shrimp
> eggs of the "shell less" variety. Thanks in advance.

We bought one bottle of "shelless" type, and will try it soon... also
interested in any "tips" you may have on this one.

Here's what we do for the normal brine shrimp: 2 liter coke bottle. In the
top I drilled a small hole and poked in a drip irrigation tap (available
at home stores for like 25 random elbows, tees and taps for $2).  This
seal is waterproof if done right... sometimes it takes practice to not
tear the bottle top.  (See the CO2 page on the Krib; this is the same as a
"yeast CO2 reactor" design!)  Turned bottle upside down, cut about 1.5" 
hole in "bottom"  (now the top)  so it can be filled with water, eggs and
salt. Hooked airline to drip tap;  we also added a small inline valve
about 2" from the bottle.  Hung the thing from a hook with a light on top. 
When temp is too low, stick in a small heater.  Make sure air pump is at
higher level than the hatchery, or else water will backflow and
electrocute the pump.  We run two of these at a time, staggered by 1-2
days so we always have food available.  The heater moves between the two
hatcheries, because it is no longer needed once the naplii have hatched.

When hatching we first turn off the inline valve, then disconnect it from
the "pump side" airline... so at this point there's this little 2" piece
of airline hanging out under the hatchery.  All the brine shrimp collect
at the very bottom over the course of 2 minutes, while the empty cysts
float to the top.  We put a small cup under the hatchery and simply open
the inline valve for a few seconds.  Pure brine shrimp.  Depending on
whether it's me or Kathy doing the feeding, we might filter the baby brine
through a net to get rid of the small amount of saltwater that comes with
it (I'm the lazy one).

I think our ratios are 1.5 tsp salt for a 1/2 full bottle (1 Liter), with
1/4 to 1/2 tsp of cysts.  

Some other folks in our club have painted the top 1/3 of the hatchery
black so they can put a light at the bottom to collect the naplii, but
we've never had trouble getting them to congregate there when the air is
turned off.

  - Erik

---
Erik D. Olson					         amazingly, at home
(e-mail)


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Feeding Fry

by Lilia Stepanova <ls691035/bcm.tmc.edu>
Date: Tue, 11 Aug 1998
To: apisto/majordomo.pobox.com


Why no one suggesting to do de-encapsulation by yourself? Takes 15 
minutes.. Put some BS eggs in the net... suspend net in diluted bleach... 
mix for 5-10 min untill the eggs are the color of newly hatched BS... 
wash WELL with tap water... feed the fry...
I did not try by myself to feed the fry immediately, but tried for 
acceleration of the hatching. You can have new live BS in 10-12 hours. 
May be earlier if keep the water warm

Cheers

Lilia

On Mon, 10 Aug 1998, Darren J. Hanson wrote:

> > Oh shite... damn problem after problem these days... I just received the
> > infamous phone call from my brother that the container that had the last
> > batch of Brine Shrimp happily hatching away has been knocked over by an
> > infamous size 12 out of control (ie. he kicked it over, by accident)
> OOPS!
> 
> > Does anyone have any other ideas as to what I can feed my A. cacatuoides
> > fry that could be more nourishing that the (pre diluted) Tetra fry food
> > (for egg layers) that I have been feeding them, and that I can generally
> > make in the home since I can't get to the fish shop until this
> > weekend..??
> Well......Let's see now. We do sell a product that is deencapsulate
> brine shrimp cysts. These are processed from the low grade shrimp eggs.
> They are processed to take the shells off the egg and then dried again.
> I feed them directly to the tank (sprinkle over the surface) or soak for
> about a minute and then siphon into the tank of fry. This I would only
> recommend after your fry have been eating at least 3-7 days already. We
> have one 8oz vacuum packed package available right now for $9 plus
> shipping and handling. It comes in so handy especially in emergencies!
>  
> > I currently have some live blackworms left, frozen brine shrimp, and
> > numerous floating and semi-floating foods (tetra bits, cichlid ten,
> > etc), maybe some flake food from some sample packs... and some sample
> > packs of some OSI pellet food...
> You can also finely grind some of those flake samples.
> 
> > Argh, my life tends to be 50 million crisis' all joined in a chain :(
> This is what the learning chain is all about. You solve one crisis after
> another and soon you won't have that many to contend with all at once.
> 
> Good Luck!
> 
> Kaycy
> 
> 
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
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> 


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bbs and science

by Phoenix1/t-online.de (Wilfred Teiser)
Date: Tue, 15 Sep 1998
To: apisto/majordomo.pobox.com

Hi Helen,

Helen Burns wrote:
> -----Original Message-----
...snip
>
> My understanding is, provided the seal on the tin is not broken they will
> stay fresh.  Once opened you must keep the eggs in the fridge with a tight
> sealing lid.
> Helen
>

not at all. They stay not endless fresh. I hatched brine shrimp cysts out of a 
tin w/ unbroken seal. The hatching rate was about 40 percent. The cysts have 
been 15 yo. For that 40 perc. was a good result. I think we can say BS cysts 
would stay fresh for a long time depend on storage.

Best regards 

                  Wilfred
**************************************
       Wilfred Teiser - Germany
         phoenix1-at-t-online.de
 http://home.t-online.de/home/phoenix1
**************************************




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bbs and science

by Mike Jacobs <mfjacobs/geocities.com>
Date: Tue, 15 Sep 1998
To: apisto/majordomo.pobox.com

> 
> My understanding is, provided the seal on the tin is not broken they will
> stay fresh.  Once opened you must keep the eggs in the fridge with a tight
> sealing lid.
> Helen
> 


Not exactly Helen........a few years ago I got a can of a name brand egg
producer......it was terrible.  I called the manufacturer thinking it
was probably my fault and I really wanted to learn what or how to treat
the eggs.  At room temp even a can (tin) has a "life".......they of
course hesitate to pin it down but unopened at room temp. maybe 8 mo to
a year and a half and the hatch rate will be drastically affected.  If
keept in the refrigerator unopened maybe add another 8 mo. to a year to
the original hatch rate of the can......as soon as you open the tin and
keep it in the refrigerator the new life of the eggs....original hatch
rate.....is good only for 7-9-10 months....after that the hatch rate
even in the 'fridge starts to go down.  The best for storage is in a
freezer unopened.  I buy ohhhh....5-6-7 tins (1 lb) at a time and put
the unopened tins in the freezer.  I've had a tin in the freezer for up
to 1 1/2 years and when opened the hatch rate is virtually what the
original tin was.......promise!  Remember....this method was told to me
by the egg packaging place......this is their suggestion not my
method!!!  It works.  Keep the tins in the freezer till opened and once
opened keep it in the 'fridge and use it up before 7-8-9 months.

Have a good day!

Mike


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Dividers and Spirulina

by Doug Brown <debrown/kodak.com>
Date: Wed, 16 Sep 1998
To: apisto/majordomo.pobox.com

Thanks for the excellent tips on building dividers!

>> Also, Brine Shrimp Direct (thanks for that info Bill) sent me a sample of
>> spirulina flakes with the BBS eggs. Do any of you feed the BBS spirulina
>> (or any other supplements) and is it worth it?
>
>The spirulina flakes are for your fish not the brine shrimp, right? I've tried
>these flakes on apistos but mine prefer a meatier diet. They're great of
>mbunas
>and other vegetarian fish.

Ah, I had a nice discussion with a Brine Shrimp Direct fellow. They sell
wholesale to aquaculture people and just started the retail side of their
business. Apparently BBS can be enriched some 30 hours after starting a
batch (Instar II molt stage - whatever that is) with spirulina, as well as
being raised to adults on it. For salt water fish they are enriched with
unsaturated fatty acids as Rich mentioned.

Here's a semi-relevant link by our own Bill Vannerson:

http://www.actwin.com/fish/killietalk/month.9710/msg00014.html

-Doug Brown
debrown-at-kodak.com



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Dividers and Spirulina

by Erik Olson <erik/thekrib.com>
Date: Wed, 16 Sep 1998
To: apisto/majordomo.pobox.com

On Wed, 16 Sep 1998, Doug Brown wrote:

> Ah, I had a nice discussion with a Brine Shrimp Direct fellow. They sell
> wholesale to aquaculture people and just started the retail side of their
> business. Apparently BBS can be enriched some 30 hours after starting a
> batch (Instar II molt stage - whatever that is) with spirulina, as well as
> being raised to adults on it. For salt water fish they are enriched with
> unsaturated fatty acids as Rich mentioned.

Related note: I used to volunteer at The Seattle Aquarium, preparing food
for the local small saltwater fish.  Adult brine by themselves were not
nutritious enough, so just before we fed the fish we would "feed" the
brine shrimp a powdered mixture of spirulina, soy and possibly egg.  The
shrimps' bellies would turn green from this.  This was mostly because the
fish were too finicky to eat flake foods.  Sounds like the same deal, eh?

  - Erik

---
Erik D. Olson
erik at thekrib.com (fails? try eriko at wrq.com)


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Dividers and Spirulina

by "Vinod Kutty" <VKUTTY/prodigy.net>
Date: Tue, 15 Sep 1998
To: <apisto/majordomo.pobox.com>

>Also, Brine Shrimp Direct (thanks for that info Bill) sent me a sample of
>spirulina flakes with the BBS eggs. Do any of you feed the BBS spirulina
>(or any other supplements) and is it worth it?
>
>-Doug Brown
>debrown-at-kodak.com



Doug,

A few years ago I raised a batch of BBS all the way to adulthood to see if
and how it could be done.   I used a bare10 gal. tank with salt water,
overhead light and an airstone.  I fed them a product called Roti-Rich made
by Florida Aqua Farms [phone (352) 567-8540] and some yeast. Roti-Rich was
mostly concentrated algae, yeast and a few other things - it was a green,
sludgy liquid.  BBS turned into ABS in a couple of weeks.

I also use yeast or Roti-Rich to feed store bought ABS before I feed them to
the fish.

Florida Aqua Farms also publishes a nice book called Plankton Culture
Manual, a well-researched and informative book that says BBS should be fed
within 10-12 hours after hatching...unless you feed them.  4 and 5 day old
juv. BS fed on algae are perfect food for large-gaped Apistos like
cacatuoides and Laetacara sp.


Vinny
vkutty-at-prodigy.net



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(yummies for the tummy) Artemia revolution question

by richardb/cognos.UUCP (Richard Brosseau)
Date: 7 Feb 92
Newsgroup: alt.aquaria,rec.aquaria

In article <1992Feb6.201436.17674-at-wam.umd.edu> harold-at-wam.umd.edu (James B. Harold) writes:
+In article <1992Feb6.171720.5252-at-ctr.columbia.edu> mstephens.520-at-postman.gsfc.nasa.gov (mark stephens) writes:
+>I purchased, a while back, some of those "Artemia revolution" eggs.  They
+>are the kind which have been treated chemically to remove the outter shell.
+>I've lost the instructions.
+>
+>1)  Is the standard ratio of salt to water OK to use.  I thought I had read
+>that it was different with these types of eggs.
+>
+>2)  What experience has any folks had with these?
+>
+
+None at all :-).  But I have a question of my own on them.
+My Daleco catalog gives instructions on stripping Artemia egg shells 
+with chlorine.  Is this what the "Artemia revolution" eggs are?
+Has anybody tried stripping egg shells in this way?  Is it worth the
+effort?  By the way, they say that once they are stripped that you
+hatch them in the normal way.

No, its probably not worth the effort to strip them yourself.

I use Artemia Revolution, but I don't bother to hatch them. The unhatched
eggs are digestable and alot smaller than new-hatched brine shrimp. I feed
them directly to clownfish larvae.

I did hatch a batch just to see; hatch them just like regular eggs.

-- 
Richard Brosseau - Cognos Incorporated  UUNET:uunet!cognos.uucp!richardb
BITNET:ccs.carleton.ca!cognos.uucp!richardb

From: harold-at-wam.umd.edu (James B. Harold)
Date: Sun, 9 Feb 1992 19:41:20 GMT

(LIVE FOOD) Re: (yummies for the tummy) Artemia revolution question

by
Newsgroup: alt.aquaria,rec.aquaria

In article <1992Feb07.081813.4563-at-Veritas.COM> oleg-at-veritas.com (Oleg Kiselev) writes:
>
>So, what is the procedure Daleco suggests?  I have heard one method 
>where:
>	1) the eggs are pre-soaked in fresh water for 1 hour
>	2) dumped into 50% water/household clorine bleach solution
>	for a while (5 min? 15? 1 hour?)
>	3) the stripped eggs are washed and hatched normally OR 
>	immediately dried and frozen OR fed to fish "as is"
>

That's about it.  Daleco says: Soak 1 tsp of eggs in 3 ounces of fresh
water for 1 hour (use an airstone to keep things moving). Add 2
ounces of Chlorox and stir continuously for 4 min.  The color will
change from brown to pink as the outer shells are dissolved.  Pour
the eggs through a brine shrimp net and rinse with fresh water.  Put
the eggs in 8 ounces of fresh water with 1 Tbs vinegar to neutralize
any remaining chlorine.  Rinse again in fresh water.  Hatch normally.

I may try this in a few days...I have a whole mess of Glossolepis
wanamensis fry who'd probably appreciate it...If people are 
interested I'll let you know how well it works.

James Harold
harold-at-lpf.umd.eduu

From: sonny-at-cbnewsf.cb.att.com (joseph.j.de rosa)
Date: 10 Feb 92 16:49:54 GMT

(LIVE FOOD) Re: (yummies for the tummy) Artemia revolution question

by
Newsgroup: alt.aquaria,rec.aquaria

In article <1992Feb07.081813.4563-at-Veritas.COM> oleg-at-veritas.com (Oleg Kiselev) writes:
>harold-at-wam.umd.edu (James B. Harold) writes:

[decapsulating brine shrimp question deleted]

>>Has anybody tried stripping egg shells in this way?  

yes. 

>>Is it worth the effort?  
>
>Supposedly it raises the hatch ratio to nearly 100% and whatever
>does not "hatch" still makes a fair meal for the fish.  It's supposed
>to reduce the hatching time too.  

It does both of these. It also gives slightly more nutritous baby brine shrimp
since they will not have to fight their way out of the tough egg shells.

>So, what is the procedure Daleco suggests?  I have heard one method 
>where:
>	1) the eggs are pre-soaked in fresh water for 1 hour
>	2) dumped into 50% water/household clorine bleach solution
>	for a while (5 min? 15? 1 hour?)
>	3) the stripped eggs are washed and hatched normally OR 
>	immediately dried and frozen OR fed to fish "as is"
>

My method (sorry I don't have the exact recipie) is to soak the 
brine shrimp eggs in fresh water for an hour (airate them as if you were 
trying to hatch them). Chill the bleach before you use it (the reaction 
will generate heat), and add the proper ammount (sorry, but I don't 
remember the concentration. 50% sounds too strong, but I might be wrong). 
Stir the eggs in the bleach mix. The solution will change in color from 
brown to white to orange. Orange is the correct color. As SOON AS THE SOLUTION 
TURNS ORANGE< strain the eggs and rinse with fresh water. Add dechlorinator
to stop the reaction. BE SURE TO RINSE THE EGGS WELL, OR YOU WILL NOT GET
A GOOD HATCH. Use the stripped eggs immediately. DO NOT DRY OUT!!! DO NOT 
FREEZE!! Brine shrimp eggs are very resistant to drying and freezing BECAUSE 
of the egg shell. You have removed this protection.

I don't bother stripping any brine shrimp eggs anymore. It is easy enough to 
do, but I only hatch 1/4-1/2 teaspoon/day, and I get a real good hatch
from the eggs I use. You should try it once or twice and decide if you 
want the extra work. (I don't bother stripping bad eggs anymore either. I 
just throw them out and get a new batch).

Joe DeRosa


Green and Black Brine Shrimp?

by oleg/netcom.com (Oleg Kiselev)
Date: Thu, 28 Jan 1993
Newsgroup: rec.aquaria

In article <1k2094INNoc0-at-shelley.u.washington.edu> brucehuy-at-u.washington.edu writes:
>in the last week I've noticed that some of the brine shrimp have turned
>green or black.  I'm not exactly sure if the shrimp have suddenly turned this 
>color, or if they just have grown to a large enough size to notice the 

Supposedly the colour depends on the diet, but I have also noticed the colour 
differences in the shrimp that can't be just explained away by that.  

I think there is a variation in colour among the specimens in the same
culture that is genetic in nature.  If anyone has a better explanation, I'd
like to hear it -- mine sounds rather doubtful.
-- 
Oleg Kiselev at home			...use the header to find the path


[FOOD] Brine shrimp eggs, was Re: Tubifex Worms

by mattk/cbnewsl.cb.att.com (matthew.kaufman)
Date: Wed, 12 Feb 1992
Newsgroup: alt.aquaria,rec.aquaria

In article <1992Feb6.111046.28283-at-llustig.palo-alto.ca.us> oleg-at-llustig.palo-alto.ca.us (Oleg Kiselev) writes:
>In article <1992Feb5.141347.1835-at-cbfsb.att.com> sonny-at-cbnewsf.cb.att.com (joseph.j.de rosa) writes:
>>similar foods) can be contaminated with pesticide residues. So can some of 
>>the Asian Brine Shrimp eggs that are (infrequently) offered for sale at VERY
>>cheap prices. You are probably fairly safe if you use a name brand.
>
>It may be worth mentioning that not all brine shrimp eggs are alike even
>from the brand-name manufacturers.
>
>OSI brand seems to have a better hatch ratio than San Francisco Bay brand.

Pshaw! Blatant advertising! Wonder if there's remuneration involved!

This is the case for Oleg and his eggs, water, and shrimp hatching techniques.
I have found in my water that SF Bay works great, and the one can of OSI I
bought didn't do as well. I would suggest that you prospective
brine-shrimp hatchers out there in net-land try small quantities of both
(and good luck finding small quantities of OSI eggs) and see what works best.
I think some eggs do better with initially soft water, some with hard water,
different amounts of salt, heated vs. unheated incubators, etc..

>Eggs from the Great Salt Lake (Utah) marketed by OSI and other brands 
>(including a line from SF Bay) hatch into larger nauplii than the eggs from
>the San Francisco Bay.  At one point I had tried some sort of Brazilian

This is indeed true, hence I find I need to use more OSI eggs to feed fish.
>brand brine shrimp eggs and the nauplii were even larger.  Supposedly there
>are some sort of Chinese-origin strain of Artemia salina eggs that have
>*much larger* nauplii yet.
>
>So keep that in mind when you select the brand of brine shrimp eggs.
>

I once tried some 'Aquarium Systems' eggs, in a small test-tube thingie
on a cardboard holder. Those eggs hatched great! Couldn't find them in
one lb. cans, though..

>Another observation:  I have been noticing what seems to be a vitamin
>or essential nutrient deficiency in SOME species of fish I keep after I
>switch to feeding them a diet of primarily OSI baby brine shrimp and Grindal
>worms.  So don't make OSI baby brine the *only* food you are feeding your
>fish.  I have noticed that feeding adult brine shrimp seems to not cause
>this.  I have no data to confirm any of this except my own observations, nor
>do I know if using another egg brand will have a different effect.
>-- 
>Oleg Kiselev, at home			....use the header to find the path


-- 
But if he got part	| Copyright 1991 mattk-at-usl.com. Permission for
of your fabulous brain,	| reproduction in printed media or by pay-for-read
what did you get in 	| services explicitly disallowed. Permission granted
exchange?		| for reproduction by USENET and like free facilities.

From: sonny-at-cbnewsf.cb.att.com (joseph.j.de rosa)
Date: 13 Feb 92 15:19:45 GMT

[FOOD] (food) Brine shrimp eggs, was Re: Tubifex Worms

by
Newsgroup: alt.aquaria,rec.aquaria

In article <1992Feb12.181707.23313-at-cbnewsl.cb.att.com> mattk-at-cbnewsl.cb.att.com (matthew.kaufman) writes:
>In article <1992Feb6.111046.28283-at-llustig.palo-alto.ca.us> oleg-at-llustig.palo-alto.ca.us (Oleg Kiselev) writes:
>>In article <1992Feb5.141347.1835-at-cbfsb.att.com> sonny-at-cbnewsf.cb.att.com (joseph.j.de rosa) writes:

>>>[stuff about pesticide residues in freeze dried tubifex worms deleted]
>>
>>It may be worth mentioning that not all brine shrimp eggs are alike even
>>from the brand-name manufacturers.
>>
>>OSI brand seems to have a better hatch ratio than San Francisco Bay brand.
>
>Pshaw! Blatant advertising! Wonder if there's remuneration involved!
>
>This is the case for Oleg and his eggs, water, and shrimp hatching techniques.
>I have found in my water that SF Bay works great, and the one can of OSI I
>bought didn't do as well. I would suggest that you prospective
>brine-shrimp hatchers out there in net-land try small quantities of both
>(and good luck finding small quantities of OSI eggs) and see what works best.
>I think some eggs do better with initially soft water, some with hard water,
>different amounts of salt, heated vs. unheated incubators, etc..
>

Matt K. had some real problems with a can of OSI eggs. I believe that we 
determined that the can was heated or something, and that the contents were
NOT typical of OSI. Both OSI and SFB should result in equivilent hatches
(+95%). He claimed that the eggs that I gave him (from an OLD can of OSI that
has been sitting in the basementfor 5 months) hatched as well as the SFB eggs.

>>Eggs from the Great Salt Lake (Utah) marketed by OSI and other brands 
>>(including a line from SF Bay) hatch into larger nauplii than the eggs from
>>the San Francisco Bay.  At one point I had tried some sort of Brazilian
>
>This is indeed true, hence I find I need to use more OSI eggs to feed fish.
>
>>brand brine shrimp eggs and the nauplii were even larger.  Supposedly there
>>are some sort of Chinese-origin strain of Artemia salina eggs that have
>>*much larger* nauplii yet.

Here is where I get REAL upset. I had tried to post an original article to 
the Killie mailing list and this newsgroup a few weeks ago.  Somehow I seem 
to have lost the article, and it never made it through to anyone else. 
Real frustrating. (if anyone DID get a copy of my original post, please send 
a copy back).

I'll try again from memory:

Brine shrimp are found all over the world. The original strain was described
in 1755 from a location in England. Brine shrimp are no longer available from
this location. 
The San Francisco strain of Brine Shrimp (Artemia franciscana SFB) yields the 
smallest nauplii of all commercaially available strains. There are ~325,000
cysts/gram (dry), and newly hatched nauplii are ~425 microns (<1/2 mm) long.
Rehydrated cycts are ~220 microns in diameter.

The Great Salt Lake strain (Artemia franciscana GSL) is a sibling species.
There are ~250,000 cysts/gram (dry), and newly hatched nauplii are 
~490 microns long.

A third strain is sometimes available from the Far East 
(Artemia parthenogenetica). Partenogenic strains are available to reproduce 
without males. These parthenogenic strains live in areas of much harsher
environmental conditions when compared to the American strains. The 
parthenogenic strains are the largest available comercially. There are ~250,000
cysts/gram (dry), and newly hatched nauplii are ~510 microns long.
These strains come from areas that still use DDT, which accumulates in the 
lipids of the brine shrimp and cysts, and are detrimental to the animals fed 
these contaminants.

Other strains are occaisionally available, including an Australian strain
(from Shark Bay), an Argentinean strain (from a borax lake) and 2 Brazilian
strains (one transplanted from San Francisco Bay). 

All of the strains of Brine Shrimp have different lipid compositions, due to
their varrious diets. These determine the nutritional quality of the shrimp.
The most nutritions shrimp are those that are newly hatched, since there are
more of these lipids available (these lipids are the energy reserve of 
the nauplii, and are mostly depleted within the first 48-72 hours). Each 
strain of brine shrimp has a different lipidprofile, which will make some more 
(or less) appropriate for certain culture organisms. Studies have been done
(on food fish larvae/fry) that indicate that some of the strains are 
inappropriate, as certain critical nutritional items are not available. This
is indicated by die-off of the cultured organism after a certain growth
period. These studies have been based on a single strain of brine shrimp being 
used as a food source. 

I am trying to arrange a study for killifish (hey, that's what I'm interested 
in) using various strains of Brine shrimp as an exclusive food and reporting on
growth/survival rates. I have 5 strains of brine shrimp eggs (SF bay, Great 
Salt Lake, Argentina, a Parthenogenic strain and another location I don't 
remember off-hand). I recently obtained some killie eggs to experiment with.
I'm still setting up some equipment to reun the experiments (work sometimes 
gets in the way).
I'd appreciate it if anyone out there who has sources for other geographical 
strains of brine shrimp eggs would contact me. I am especially interested in
the Macau_Brazil strain, the Italian strain, and any other European strains.

I believe that this is what Oleg is seeing. The brine shrimp strain that he is
using does NOT supply all the nutritional requirements of the fish he is 
trying to raise. This illustrates the need for a varied diet, even for fry.
I have achieved my best success with raising fry by feeding mainly newly 
hatched brine shrimp (but I also keep some live plants with all my fry, as well
as a small amount of live tubifex worms). I have found that fry kept in very
clean conditions and fed an exclusive diet of baby brine shrimp do not grow as
fast or do as well.

>>So keep that in mind when you select the brand of brine shrimp eggs.
>
>I once tried some 'Aquarium Systems' eggs, in a small test-tube thingie
>on a cardboard holder. Those eggs hatched great! Couldn't find them in
>one lb. cans, though..

The small tubes of brine shrimp eggs are not really that good, since they
are not vaccume sealed. I've bought them too (when I needed shrimp FAST), and
many of the tubes have damp eggs in them. These tubes will not yield any 
shrimp (but you can strip the shells and feed fry anyway).

>>Another observation:  I have been noticing what seems to be a vitamin
>>or essential nutrient deficiency in SOME species of fish I keep after I
>>switch to feeding them a diet of primarily OSI baby brine shrimp and Grindal
>>worms.  So don't make OSI baby brine the *only* food you are feeding your
>>fish.  I have noticed that feeding adult brine shrimp seems to not cause
>>this.  I have no data to confirm any of this except my own observations, nor
>>do I know if using another egg brand will have a different effect.
>
>
>-- 
>But if he got part	| Copyright 1991 mattk-at-usl.com. Permission for
>of your fabulous brain,| reproduction in printed media or by pay-for-read
>what did you get in 	| services explicitly disallowed. Permission granted
>exchange?		| for reproduction by USENET and like free facilities.

From: richardb-at-cognos.UUCP (Richard Brosseau)
Date: 13 Feb 92 19:57:04 GMT

[FOOD] (food) Brine shrimp eggs, was Re: Tubifex Worms

by
Newsgroup: alt.aquaria,rec.aquaria

In article <1992Feb13.151945.22377-at-cbfsb.att.com> sonny-at-cbnewsf.cb.att.com (joseph.j.de rosa) writes:
+In article <1992Feb12.181707.23313-at-cbnewsl.cb.att.com> mattk-at-cbnewsl.cb.att.com (matthew.kaufman) writes:
+>In article <1992Feb6.111046.28283-at-llustig.palo-alto.ca.us> oleg-at-llustig.palo-alto.ca.us (Oleg Kiselev) writes:
+>>In article <1992Feb5.141347.1835-at-cbfsb.att.com> sonny-at-cbnewsf.cb.att.com (joseph.j.de rosa) writes:
+
+>>>[stuff about pesticide residues in freeze dried tubifex worms deleted]
+>>
+>>It may be worth mentioning that not all brine shrimp eggs are alike even
+>>from the brand-name manufacturers.
+>>
+>>OSI brand seems to have a better hatch ratio than San Francisco Bay brand.
+>
+>Pshaw! Blatant advertising! Wonder if there's remuneration involved!
+>

[stuff deleted]

+All of the strains of Brine Shrimp have different lipid compositions, due to
+their varrious diets. These determine the nutritional quality of the shrimp.
+The most nutritions shrimp are those that are newly hatched, since there are
+more of these lipids available (these lipids are the energy reserve of 
+the nauplii, and are mostly depleted within the first 48-72 hours). Each 
+strain of brine shrimp has a different lipidprofile, which will make some more 
+(or less) appropriate for certain culture organisms. Studies have been done
+(on food fish larvae/fry) that indicate that some of the strains are 
+inappropriate, as certain critical nutritional items are not available. This
+is indicated by die-off of the cultured organism after a certain growth
+period. These studies have been based on a single strain of brine shrimp being 
+used as a food source. 

This is quite right. There are 2 categories of brine shrimp; fresh-water
and marine. Thes names aren't really accurate; they don't describe the
type of water the brine shrimp live in but rather the lipid or essential
acid conposition. Shrimp from Great Salt Lake are fresh-water type, and
their lipid are better suited to fresh-water animal species, such as
killifish. San Fransico Bay brine shrimp are a marine-type, and they are
best suited to feeding marine animal species, such as clownfish.

+I am trying to arrange a study for killifish (hey, that's what I'm interested 
+in) using various strains of Brine shrimp as an exclusive food and reporting on
+growth/survival rates. I have 5 strains of brine shrimp eggs (SF bay, Great 
+Salt Lake, Argentina, a Parthenogenic strain and another location I don't 
+remember off-hand). I recently obtained some killie eggs to experiment with.
+I'm still setting up some equipment to reun the experiments (work sometimes 
+gets in the way).

Of course, a brine-shrimp only diet  won't be optimal. There's bound to be
something missing in the shrimp tissue composition that  may show up
as a difficiancy later on.

+I believe that this is what Oleg is seeing. The brine shrimp strain that he is
+using does NOT supply all the nutritional requirements of the fish he is 
+trying to raise. This illustrates the need for a varied diet, even for fry.

Yes, but Great Salt Lake brine shrimp are totalty OK for the type of fish
in this case. All fish should be weaned off brine shrimp though.


-- 
Richard Brosseau - Cognos Incorporated  UUNET:uunet!cognos.uucp!richardb
BITNET:ccs.carleton.ca!cognos.uucp!richardb


Murex shrimp

by "Newman, L" <Lee_Newman/bc.sympatico.ca>
Date: Mon, 04 Jan 1999
To: apisto/majordomo.pobox.com

Fi205sh@aol.com wrote:
> 
> Hi Lee glad to hear you took my advice on FBS. Do you know if the enriched
> Murex shrimp are available in the states & what do they call it. I tried the
> regular but my fish eat SF Bay brand better.
> Tom W.

Hi Tom (and anyone else interested),

The enriched (with Aglamac and Selco - HUFA's) is sold in the U.S. by
Aquaculture Supply in Tampa, FL. Frank Hoff is the contact; tel (352)
567-8540. The enriched Artemia are sent from Canada, they are frozen in
less than twelve minutes while they are alive. Upon thawing, the body of
the shrimp is fully intact. The company (Murex) is still experimenting
with the fatty acid profiles - at the time being the focus is on
aquaculture applications (food shrimp broodstock maturation), but I've
suggested that Artemia enriched with fatty acid profiles specifically
for freshwater fish would also find a ready market.

Hope this helps.

Lee
Vancouver


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couple of questions

by "Cory and Susanne Williamson" <webwill/infinet.net>
Date: Tue, 11 May 1999
To: <apisto/admin.listbox.com>

Paul,

I have been using dried decapsulated brine shrimp for a few weeks now- they
are awesome-cheap, and no need to worry about bubbling jars of saltwater
anymore- growth rates seem to be as good as or better (observational) than
live BBS.
I have bought them from Brine Shrimp Direct in Calif..
www.brineshrimpdirect.com
These guys have given me pretty good service- I am sure there are other
companies out there.

Cheers,

Cory Williamson
Vanc. BC
-----Original Message-----
From: Paul Evans <pm_evans@yahoo.com>
To: apisto@admin.listbox.com <apisto@admin.listbox.com>
Date: May 11, 1999 9:39 AM
Subject: Re: couple of questions


>Bob,
>
>please forgive my ignorance.  I seem to recall seeing
>some decapsulated brine shrimp eggs at a LFS once.  If
>memory serves, they were were in a glass vial packed
>in some kind of liquid.  I did not pay much attention
>to them.  Are dry ones availible?  Perhaps what I saw
>was not decapsulated brine shrimp eggs at all.  If
>indeed they are sold wet, how does one use an
>automatic
>feeder to put them in the tank without the eggs
>spoiling or the liquid they are packed in polluting
>the
>water.
>
>This sounds like something that will be useful.  The
>fry did not go for the crushed Tetra Bits last night.
>
>Thanks for the advise Bob, you have been very helpful.
>
>Paul
>> If they will eat frozen dphnia, they will definitely
>> eat de-capsulated brines
>> shrimp eggs.  You can use this in your automatic
>> feeder.  On short notice you
>> will probably have to buy the big-buck stuff from
>> your LFS, but there is some
>> that is really cheap available around the web that
>> won't hatch, but WILL feed
>> your fry quite nicely.
>>
>> Bob Dixon
>>
>>
>>
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>> apisto@majordomo.pobox.com.
>> For instructions on how to subscribe or unsubscribe
>> or get help,
>> email apisto-request@majordomo.pobox.com.
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>> "Apistogramma Mailing List Archives"!
>>
>
>_________________________________________________________
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>Free instant messaging and more at http://messenger.yahoo.com
>
>
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Archives"!
>




cyclop-eeze

by Frauley/Elson <fraulels/minet.ca>
Date: Sat, 01 Apr 2000
To: apisto/majordomo.pobox.com

Tim Ellis wrote:
> 
> I have been using frozen cyclops for a year or so now with good results, but the fry
> need to be 1/4 inch long or more to fit it in their mouths. How can I get some
> cyclop-eeze? Mail-order?
> 
> Thanks,
> 
> Tim
A thread on these just cooled down on the killie list. It seems the
distributor is a new company, and their site offers only bulk amounts. I
think they'll get easier to find with the passage of time.
I'm having fantastic results with Apisto sp vielfleck, taeniata,
njisseni and macmasteri fry/juveniles using decapsulated brine shrimp as
a staple. Mixed in water, shaken and poured (or squirted with a turkey
baster) they are accepted, and growth is great. I'm getting some
cyclop-eeze too, so I'll try that.
I'm using Russian brine shrimp with encouraging results. It took some
tinkering. If I use approximately half the salt I use for American
artemia, I get a first rate hatch of smaller, paler beasties in about 36
hours at 19C. I can see why these artemia would be easier to grow up, as
they seem hardier than American artemia, living longer in the culture.
They're half the price of US eggs.
I only make one batch a week now, with the "decap" as my cheaper staple,
but I am increasingly pleased.
-Gary (in Montreal)


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decapsulated brine shrimp eggs

by "Matthijs Wachtmeester" <emwee/chello.nl>
Date: Mon, 12 Jun 2000
To: "apisto/majordomo.pobox.com" <apisto/majordomo.pobox.com>

On Mon, 12 Jun 2000 09:26:52 -0400, gkadar wrote:

>The female cacatoides has a brood that's been free-swimming for about 5 days
>now.  I've been giving them the decapsulated brine shrimp and the fry don't
>recognize them as food.  This has been going on now for three days three
>times per day.  How long does it take them to realize that the stuff coming
>down in front of their noses is actually edible?  Or are my fry especially
>stupid or stubborn?  They are grazing on the rocks and in the java moss.

I've had the same with several batches of angel fry. They simply ignored the brine 
shrimp eggs. After feeding the fry live BBS once or twice they recognized the "smell" 
and ate the eggs.

Greetings, Matthijs

e-mail:	emwee@chello.nl






brine shrimp

by Tony Terceira <terceira/ride.ri.net>
Date: Fri, 22 Dec 2000
To: apisto/listbox.com

         Assuming you have good eggs,

                 I use 3 tablespoons of salt per liter of water, I use 
Kosher salt, or Solar salt (rock salt for water systems) and sea salt, have 
used combinations of all and every other combination.  Have notice little 
difference with Utah Shrimp, San Francisco shrimp eggs which are much 
smaller upon hatching, do much better with more sea salt.  I add a small 
pinch of Epsom salt,  less than a quarter of a teaspoon.

                 Eggs are in an inverted two liter bottle, heavy 
aeration,       and a temperature of 80-84 degrees, hatch is 24-30 
hours,   lower temperature will increase hatch time,  but not below 75 for 
any reasonable hatch.

                 I keep separate hatches of San Francisco  and Utah shrimp 
going.  Fry are able to consume San Francisco shrimp two or three days 
earlier because of their smaller size.  The sooner live baby brine, the 
better the spawning size,  I work with many species that have small fry and 
this has been the way I have used bbs over the past 30+ years.

                                                 Tony


At 07:41 PM 12/22/00 -0600, you wrote:
>2 tablespoons of salt per quart is what I had read.  In my experience, 
>temperature between 82 - 86 degrees has been the best.  I think you would 
>see a difference with the temperature change.  You can always consider bad 
>eggs if you have had them awhile.  I hope this helps.
>Bonny
>----- Original Message -----
>From: jonathan
>Sent: Friday, December 22, 2000 7:20 PM
>To: apisto@listbox.com
>Subject:
>
>
>
>Hi gang! I am having terrible hatch rates with Brine Shrimp cysts (Artemia
>spp.). I am using a heater keeping the hatchery at about 75 F, I used 50%
>seawater and 50% freshwater to achieve a specific gravity of 1.014 (as
>recommended by the package instructions). I use airstones for circulation
>and aeration. I can only guess that the salinity is inappropriate. I used
>to hatch brine shrimp with great success years ago. I seem to remember
>using something like a tablespoon (3 teaspoons) of salt per gallon (1.004
>specific gravity). What salinity level (ppm)/ specific gravity/ teaspoons
>or tablespoons of salt per gallon has been successful for you fellow
>aquarists?
>
>Kind regards,
>Jonathan
>
>-------------------------------------------
>Jonathan Fung... Reef Geek
>Dalhousie University Honours Marine Biology
>Aqua Creations Inc. Assistant Manager
>writer for Marine Fish Monthly
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Hatching Brine Shrimp

by BigJohnW/webtv.net (John Wubbolt)
Date: Thu, 28 Dec 2000
To: apisto/listbox.com

Hello Randy
I am very fortunate that i have been getting good hatch rates out of my
cans, im not sure of the brand name, but i get them through my killie
club.   UNYKA buys cans by the case and sells them to club members,
where ever we can get a good deal in bulk numbers is where we've been
getting them from.   In the past i have had a few cans that were not
very good hatch rates. I've always found that adding a little extra salt
helps me get better hatch rates.   I dont know if im being overly
cautious but i use marine salts for my hatching salts, ive found this to
be the best.   People say that salt is salt , but this isnt so.
Several years ago a former member of my Killie group, Jeff Bilbrough,
ran a test on hatching brine shrimp.   He found that if you use regular
salt to hatch bbs, that the pH in the jar was ok ( alkaline around 7.8 )
until they eggs hatched then the pH went down alot to around 7.2 or in
that range.   Using Marine salt, pH before hatching was around 8.0 and
stayed higher after eggs hatched, above 7.6.    What ever reasons, Using
Marine salts helped life span of baby brine shrimp and helped hatch
rates.   I cant be specific of all details as Jeff passed away awhile
ago.   But i know he was a very good aquarist, one of the best i've ever
known.   What he did worked and has worked for me since.    So my
recomendation is to try using marine salts.   Costs me $30 for a big 5
gallon bucket and i've been using it for around a year now!!   For the
10 or 15 cents a day , why not , considering the cost of eggs now!

John




Hatching Brine Shrimp

by "Mike" <mikeymeyer/sprintmail.com>
Date: Wed, 27 Dec 2000
To: <apisto/listbox.com>

Just to branch out on this subject...
I have a one pound can of Brine Shrimp that I bought 5 years ago from
Angel's Plus.  I don't use it much.  When I do treat my fish with BBS.  I
get a 90% hatch out rate.  I paid $16 for the can!  It did have a silica
sand packet inside to absorb moisture.  Are all of the manufactures doing
this.  I understand moisture is the biggest problem for the cysts.  Ready
for feedback...


----- Original Message -----
From: "jonathan" <fung@is2.dal.ca>
To: <apisto@listbox.com>
Sent: Wednesday, December 27, 2000 9:23 PM
Subject: Re: Hatching Brine Shrimp


>
> thanks for everyone's help. It seems that the hatch rate at 83F, 3
> teaspoons of salt per litre is giving me the same hatch rate as
> previously, at the unconventional parameters. Both hatch rates are low. I
> can only conclude that my eggs are old, probably having sat on the shelf
> of the distributor's warehouse for some time.
>
>
> -------------------------------------------
> Jonathan Fung... Reef Geek
> Dalhousie University Honours Marine Biology
> Aqua Creations Inc. Assistant Manager
> writer for Marine Fish Monthly
> -------------------------------------------
> email: fung@is2.dal.ca
>
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> Search http://altavista.digital.com for "Apistogramma Mailing List
Archives"!
>




ram fry, sigh

by GNLill/aol.com
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2002
To: apisto/listbox.com

I am new to the list, but not too long ago I saw a presentation by Al Casrto, 
who broke down bbs. Apparently, there are 3 types of bbs eggs. The largest is 
Utah, which is 3 times larger than San Francisco, which is 3 times larger 
than Southern Hemisphere eggs (the smallest). He was using these for tetra 
fry, which are, in general, pretty darn small-mouthed. I don't have any 
suggestions where to come across them, but I believe that they are pretty 
hard to find and expensive.
I have found that Rams can usually take bbs of the SF type right away, if you 
take care to harvest them in about 18 hours. In addition to (the other 
suggestion) Java Moss and general infusoria from a sponge filter that is 
already in the tank at mediocre levels, this can usually support the food 
requirements of Ram fry during the crucial first few days.    Neil




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This page was last updated 17 February 2002