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Paste Food

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  1. homemade food recipe
    by pfohl-at-nucmar.physics.fsu.edu (JEFF PFOHL) (8 Feb 1995)

homemade food recipe

by pfohl-at-nucmar.physics.fsu.edu (JEFF PFOHL)
Date: 8 Feb 1995
Newsgroup: rec.aquaria

Shaw Moldauer (shaw-at-fc.hp.com) wrote:
: Does anyone have a copy of the homemade fish food recipe I saw here a

--

---begin---

~From: narten-at-percival.cs.albany.edu (Thomas Narten)
~Subject: Homemade fish food recipes
~Date: 23 Feb 1994 13:48:19 GMT

In article <2ke1et$4t0-at-crcnis1.unl.edu> latenser-at-unlinfo.unl.edu (Latenser) writes:

> >BTW, I'm feeding them
> >freeze-dried tubifex worms, flake food, frozen brine shrimp, and more
> >recently, home-made paste food.
> 
> Recipe?  Hint, Hint, Nudge, Nudge.

Here is what I use.  I've only been using it 3 weeks, but my fish all
like it just fine.  I got the recipe from Steve Shine
(shine-at-hoqub.att.com).  It is based on one described by C.E. Bower in
"The Basic Marine Aquarium", 1983. Here is Steve's description:

Bower's recipe calls for shrimp, fish filet, lots of veggies (parsley, 
carrots, spinach, green beans), brewers yeast, baby vitamins, and 
gelatin.  I recall it being about 50% vegetable matter.  In my 
opinion, Bower's recipe needs another packet of gelatin; her recipe
just falls apart in my tanks.  I've received a couple of private
emails from people who've tried her recipe, some of whom say their 
fish aren't really enthusiastic about it.  That was my case as well 
(although my veggie-loving SW and FW fish did enjoy it).  I made 
another batch with some large deviations in proportions (less vegs, 
more animal matter, same vitamins), and it's a universal success with 
both my FW and SW fish.  Even my pickier killies like it.  If your 
fish have never seen paste food, they may need a couple of feedings 
before they recognize it as Good Stuff, so don't worry if they act 
uninterested on the first pass.  Like I said, all my fish love this 
stuff.

Bower, C. E., The Basic Marine Aquarium, 1983.

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Measurements are from just eyeballing it.  This recipe is based upon a 
Carol Bower's "Omnivore Diet", found in her book "The Basic Marine
Aquarium".

==========================================
Shine's version of Bower's "Omnivore Diet"
==========================================

 5 oz whole shrimp (I did remove the tail fins)
 5 oz haddock filet (I use canned tuna in water)
 4 oz crab meat 
 1 Tblspn parsley
 1 Tblspn carrot shavings
 1 Tblspn spinach
 1 Tblspn green peas
 1 Tblspn oatmeal cereal
 2 teaspns brewers yeast (ever read the composition of this stuff? Wow.)
 .5 teaspn Poly-Vi-Sol baby vitamins
 2 or 3 dashes paprika
 3 drops anise extract
 3 packets gelatin (Use Knox, cheap brands don't work as well) [note:
    I already upped the quantity of gelatin, so ignore the comments
    about using more]

Dump it all (except gelatin) into a bar blender with a couple oz water
and puree it.  Dissolve the gelatin in 10 oz boiling water, and slowly
add this into the blender while churning.  Let it sit for a minute to
let the air bubbles escape, then pour into zip lock baggies.  (If you
want floating food, blend it until you get lots of air bubbles.)  I
put enough into the baggies to make a layer about 1 cm think, which is
easy to cut up into long strips with a knife (see last step).  Lay the
baggies flat in the fridge to chill for a day to let the gelatin set
up.  I make a stack of zip lock baggies separated by small pieces of
plywood to keep the baggies flat.  DO NOT put the food directly into
the freezer or the gelatin won't do its job.  After a day in the
fridge, move the stack of baggies/plywood into the freezer.  After it
freezes, cut it into chunks or slices for feeding and put it back into
the zip locks.  The fish sure do like it.

I made a batch of this once using canned tuna (in water, of course), and
I didn't like the consistency. [Note: I used canned tuna and 3 packets
of gelatin and mine came out fine.]

A neat method of getting atin and mine came out fine.]

A neat method of getting all the air bubbles out of the zip lock baggies
when the food is hot is to submerge most of the baggie in a sink full
of water.  This forces the air up so you can easily "burp" the bag
to remove the bubbles. 

--
Thomas Narten
narten-at-cs.albany.edu

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				JEFF PFOHL
				E-MAIL: PFOHL-at-NUCMAR.PHYSICS.FSU.EDU
				PHONE : (904) 644-1598  work
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