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./corallines

Contents:

  1. [M] Adey vs. the Berliners (long)
    by steve/rhythm.com (Steve Tyree) (Thu, 25 Mar 1993)
  2. [M] Adey vs. the Berliners (long)
    by patti/hosehead.intel.com (Patti Beadles) (Fri, 26 Mar 1993)
  3. [M] Adey vs. the Berliners (long)
    by kvk/questor.sw.stratus.com (Ken Koellner) (26 Mar 1993)
  4. [M] Adey vs. the Berliners (long)
    by steve/rhythm.com (Steve Tyree) (Sat, 27 Mar 1993)
  5. [M] Anenome survival/Coralline algae
    by steve/rhythm.com (Steve Tyree) (Sun, 14 Mar 1993)
  6. [M] Anenome survival/Coralline algae
    by thk/sgi.com (Tom Kong) (15 Mar 93)
  7. Algae Scrubbers [M]
    by steve/rhythm.com (Steve Tyree) (Wed, 21 Apr 1993)
  8. [M][R] Coralline Algae & MH Lights = Dying Coralline Algae ??
    by krogers/moons.sim.es.com (Keith Rogers) (25 Oct 1993)

[M] Adey vs. the Berliners (long)

by steve/rhythm.com (Steve Tyree)
Date: Thu, 25 Mar 1993
Newsgroup: rec.aquaria

In article <1993Mar23.185856.25401-at-aus.intel.com> patti-at-hosehead.intel.com (Patti Beadles) writes:
>Coralline algae is a good metric, but I'd choose my judging sites more
>carefully.

 Yes, I can see where cleaning the front glass on the monster could be 
quite a task. I had the same growth till I srcubbed the front plexi as
clean as possible. In my reef the algae grows very well on the acrylic
transparent ends, bottom of tank where some light reaches and on the
pvc and rocks of course. What is puzzling is that my *black* rear acrylic
wall appears to support a slower coralline growth rate even though the 
metal halides are very close to this wall. 
 Coralline algae growth rate seems to work when applied to the dealer
main display tanks in southern cal. Very few of these even support good
growths. I have yet to see a hair algae laiden, underskimmed reef show
a good coralline growth rate. That is based on visiting over 30 reef
dealers in southern cal. Some of these were marginal reef supporters.
FAMA also showed some photos of the "Tunze" system reef tanks and soft
coral farms experiments in germany, they were loaded with colorful
coralline algae growing everywhere. They do claim to make a mean skimmer.

 Steve Tyree - Reef Breeder


[M] Adey vs. the Berliners (long)

by patti/hosehead.intel.com (Patti Beadles)
Date: Fri, 26 Mar 1993
Newsgroup: rec.aquaria

In article <C4FsuE.3uy-at-rhythm.com> steve-at-rhythm.com (Steve Tyree) writes:
>What is puzzling is that my *black* rear acrylic
>wall appears to support a slower coralline growth rate even though the 
>metal halides are very close to this wall. 

Black acrylic is chemically and texturally somewhat different than
clear.  Dave O'Brien was recently told by an aquarium manufacturer
that the black acrylic on a particular tank had to be thicker since
it wasn't as strong as clear.

I don't know if that's a good explanation or not, but it seems
plausible.
-- 
Patti Beadles  503/696-4358 | I don't speak for Intel, nor vice-versa.
   patti-at-hosehead.intel.com |
   75555.767-at-compuserve.com | If it wasn't for the last minute,
or just yell, "Hey, Patti!" |             I'd never get anything done!


[M] Adey vs. the Berliners (long)

by kvk/questor.sw.stratus.com (Ken Koellner)
Date: 26 Mar 1993
Newsgroup: rec.aquaria

In article <C4I4HG.MI6-at-ra.nrl.navy.mil> tse-at-ra.nrl.navy.mil (Anthony Tse) writes:
>....  In my tank, coralline grow slowly on the glass tank,
>but grow nicely on the acrylic overflow box.  Maybe someone will come
>out w/ a reef tank that's all acrylic except the front glass.
>

I have a spec on Acrylite(r), a brand of acrylic sheet.  It has all
sorts of info on chemical and physical properties.  One thing I found
kind of interesting is that after four months submerged, the sheet
will absorb about 1% of its weight in water.  The polymer structure of
acrylic must be micro porous.  That may be why the coraline algae has
an easier time attaching to the acrylic than glass.  I'd like to see
at an electron microspope picture of the surface of each material.




-- 
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Maybe he's just a little insane, like painters or composers."
							-Miracle on 34th Street


[M] Adey vs. the Berliners (long)

by steve/rhythm.com (Steve Tyree)
Date: Sat, 27 Mar 1993
Newsgroup: rec.aquaria

In article <1ov7fs$sl7-at-transfer.stratus.com> kvk-at-questor.sw.stratus.com (Ken Koellner) writes:
>I have a spec on Acrylite(r), a brand of acrylic sheet.  It has all
>sorts of info on chemical and physical properties.  One thing I found
>kind of interesting is that after four months submerged, the sheet
>will absorb about 1% of its weight in water.  The polymer structure of
>acrylic must be micro porous.  That may be why the coraline algae has
>an easier time attaching to the acrylic than glass.  I'd like to see
>at an electron microspope picture of the surface of each material.


 What I have also noticed is that corallines can "flake" off after they
have grown for awhile. I have not determined if this is due to chemical
water parameters, chevron tang grazing, turbo snail grazing or physical
properties of attached surfaces. This flaking has a tendancy to slow the
proliferation of coralline growth and hopefully is not indicative of a
die off peak or plateau much like macroalage has. 

 Steve Tyree - Reef Breeder


[M] Anenome survival/Coralline algae

by steve/rhythm.com (Steve Tyree)
Date: Sun, 14 Mar 1993
Newsgroup: rec.aquaria

In article <1993Mar9.093914.1-at-bb1t.monsanto.com> srrapp-at-bb1t.monsanto.com writes:
>and sides.  However in addition I do get growth in overflow boxes, piping etc.
>that do not recieve a lot of light.  I have read conflicting statements about
>the light requirements for coralline algae some saying it is necessary while
>others stating that it is not.  Until recently my opinion was that coralline
>algae did not have any particular lighting requirements.  Could somebody
>clarify this for me?

 High quality coralline encrusted live rock will usually contain algae on
both sides of the rock. Sometimes a different color or species of algae 
can be noticed when comparing the two sides.
 I have recently put in a lot of high quality live rock in my reef and 
elevated the structure with three pvc matrixes. Corallines are growing
on the matrix and everywhere else. The new coralline growth first appeared
only on the top surface of the matrix. Lately the algae has started to
expand to the underside of the pvc piping. My guess would be that they grow
better with increasing light. They will grow in low light but not quite as
fast. More observations are needed. I have copied a few scientific articles
on coralline algae but they are still in my incoming reading stack.
 It appears that water chemistry is very important for fast growth.

 Steve Tyree - Reef Breeder


[M] Anenome survival/Coralline algae

by thk/sgi.com (Tom Kong)
Date: 15 Mar 93
Newsgroup: rec.aquaria

In article <C3vGID.5Hn-at-rhythm.com> steve-at-rhythm.com (Steve Tyree) writes:
>
> It appears that water chemistry is very important for fast growth.
>
> Steve Tyree - Reef Breeder

Yes, when I started my first salt water tank, I was adding about half
a teaspoon of anhydrous CaCl2 everyday (to a 20gal tank), all the rocks
were completely covered with purple and pink coralline algae.  Yet
I couldn't grow any macro algae at all.  Turns out the CaCl2 depleted
the carbonate hardness to about 3-4 dKH.  After realising the problem,
I stopped adding CaCl2, KH slowly climbed back to around 7, macroalgae
started to grow, and coraline algae grew a lot slower.

/tom


Algae Scrubbers [M]

by steve/rhythm.com (Steve Tyree)
Date: Wed, 21 Apr 1993
Newsgroup: sci.aquaria,rec.aquaria,alt.aquaria

>From: jamescho-at-leland.Stanford.EDU (James Cho)

>  ...it is also true that they are the
>easiest to infest with hair algae.  some think that it is because there
>are minerals that the hair algae feeds off of.  another reason may be
>because in the beginning, there is nothing living on the rock.  thus the
>organism which is best able to compete for the rock will dominate it.
>if you are having a hair algae problem, then the hair algae will readily
>take the rock over.  on the other hand if the conditions are such that
>coralline algae will dominate, then the coralline algae will cover it.
>this theory explains why the bowl rocks is able to grow coralline algae
>and hair algae much faster than live rock.

 I have been researching corallines recently. A lot of references can be
found concerning speciation classifications, but I have been unable to 
find many articles detailing metabolisms. Have just started search though.
References concerning Red Algae (Rhodophyta) have in general detailed
the fact that inorganic nitrates and ammonia are incorporated. I have yet
to find data observed for a specific corallinaceae. Nitrates are nutrients
for red algae which can limit growth if too low. They are also toxic if too 
high. It is possible that the toxic point as well as the growth saturation 
point are lower for corallines as compared to the "green" algaes. More 
research needed to confirm this. That which applies to calcificating coral-
line, might also apply to sceleractinian corals. The other possible growth
war inducer, might be the potential calcification rate. If both are true, a
reef which supports heavy green algae growth, might not support good
calcification or coralline growth. If corallines take up nutrients like macro
and micro green algaes, the compatabilty with coral issue should guide 
a reefer to promote the coralline growth on the reef. Of course you would
not be able to harvest the excess growth from trays weekly, but the site
of a growing coralline encrusting reef would be awesome and beneficial 
to the corals contained within. My current problem is that the blooming
growths of corallines are flaking or chipping off due to grazing or some
other environmental factor. I harvest coralline flakes. I need to determine
if tank is to nutrient poor or possibly some element needs to be elevated.
 
 It might be possible that a reef running at a median level, could be artifi-
cially stimulated with high concentrations of calcium to acheive good 
coralline growth even in an environment that has tipped the growth war in 
favor of  the green or non-calcifiying red algae (Rhodophyta). 

 Steve Tyree - Reef Breeder


[M][R] Coralline Algae & MH Lights = Dying Coralline Algae ??

by krogers/moons.sim.es.com (Keith Rogers)
Date: 25 Oct 1993
Newsgroup: rec.aquaria,alt.aquaria

sbjie-at-engr.psu.edu (Sanjay Joshi) writes:

>IN the last month since moving from a flourocent lit 29G to a 55G lit by 2 MH 
>and 2 actinics, i have been noticing a decline in the coralline aglae.  At 
>first I noticed that the nice pink, and purple shades of the algae were 
>fading, and now I think that they may be actually dying.

The various kinds of corallines are quite dependent upon light levels
in my experience.  What you're experiencing is the die-off of the
lower light loving kinds which will eventually be replaced with ones
that like more light.  Presumably some of the current species can
adapt to brighter light levels as well.

For an interesting factoid, a certain species of coralline algae holds
the record for the ability to grow in the lowest light level of all
photosynthetic organisms ever recorded.  It was found in the Carribean
at a depth of ~350 m; more than 100 m deeper than the next lowest
light tolerating photosynthetic organism ever found anywhere.  There's
a photo of the stuff in Biology of Plants, 5 ed. by Raven, et.al.
-- 
Keith Rogers
krogers-at-moons.sim.es.com


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