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Contents:

  1. (M) Invert suggestions
    by fssmith/venus.lerc.nasa.gov (Greg Smith (SVER)) (8 Jan 92)
  2. (M) Invert suggestions
    by patti/hosehead.intel.com (Patti Beadles) (Thu, 9 Jan 1992)
  3. (No Title)
    by ()
  4. Closed brain corals
    by steve/celia.UUCP (Steve Tyree) (12 Nov 92)

(M) Invert suggestions

by fssmith/venus.lerc.nasa.gov (Greg Smith (SVER))
Date: 8 Jan 92
Newsgroup: rec.aquaria

In article <1992Jan7.214329.25043-at-ssd.kodak.com>, morss-at-eksignal.kodak.com (Charlie Morss) writes...
> 
> 
>I've posted a brief summary of the reponses. I still have some concerns
>so I thought I'd let everyone help out and get their opinions in! 
>---------  The summary of responses w/ my questions  -----------------
> 
>elegent coral - use suppliements (Liquid Gold and PSM) 
>                      >> I love these except I have heard they need 
>                         lots of light w/ supplements (supp. not a 
>                         problem, light on the otherhand...). And even then
>                         they tend to shrival up and die. Is this 
>                         really the case?

I have kept these for several years and they are doing well.  I do not add any
any 'unknown' supplements.  I have been adding calcium and iodine for about 
8 months and strontium for about 3 months.  I have the elegans in very
intense light with about 6 inches of water over them.  The tank is lit by
4 175 watt metal halide lights.
I moved one of them when I removed the gravel from my tank and 
changed from 4 160 watt VHO flourescents to metal halides.  He was doing fine
on on the bottom of my 125 gallon aquarium.

> 
>Tubastrea aurea or cup coral.  This requires very low light conditions,
>  and should be placed under an overhang in a rock if at all possible.  It
>  does, however, require frequent feedings.
>                        >> What do you feed this? I don't feed my finger
>                           leather coral anything - it's doing well, maybe
>                           I should be feeding it. Any suggestions?  

Leather corals don't need to be fed.  They can get all their nourishment
from photosynthesis.

The tubastrea should be fed at least
weakly.  Frozen brine shrimp which has been thawed in salt water and drained
to remove the nutrient laden water works well.  This coral will slowly die
if it does not get some sort of plankton substitute.

>Sponges                 >> Heard where almost impossible to keep. Has anyone
>                           kept one for any length of time? Lighting, etc?

I have had an orange sponge for 2 years and it is growing ever so slowly.  It
is kept in the dark under some rocks.


(M) Invert suggestions

by patti/hosehead.intel.com (Patti Beadles)
Date: Thu, 9 Jan 1992
Newsgroup: rec.aquaria

In article <1992Jan7.214329.25043-at-ssd.kodak.com> morss-at-eksignal.kodak.com (Charlie Morss) writes:
>  Only suppliment - Liquid gold (what's in this anyhow!?!)


(No Title)

by

(I haven't even posted this yet, and I feel my mailbox getting deluged.
The book is brand new and hot off the presses.)

>Tridacna Crocea clam  >> I heard these need lots of light (i.e. MH). Should
>                         I skip the clams for now?

Clams need lots of light.

>open brain -  Mine seems to be doing great. Pretty also.
>                      >> Again, light requirements?

Prefer not to be in extremely strong light, from everything I've read.
They're hardy as all hell; I have two, and they take all sorts of abuse.
(_Trachyphyllia jeoffreyi_)

>elegent coral - use suppliements (Liquid Gold and PSM) 

Mine absolutely loves the lights.  I have one that sits directly under
a 400W MH, and it couldn't be happier.  (_Catalaphyllia jardinei_)

>Tubastrea aurea or cup coral.  This requires very low light conditions,
>  and should be placed under an overhang in a rock if at all possible.  It
>  does, however, require frequent feedings.
>                        >> What do you feed this? I don't feed my finger
>                           leather coral anything - it's doing well, maybe
>                           I should be feeding it. Any suggestions?  

Cup corals require frequent feedings with things such as live brine.  I've
heard that if you feed them daily, they will grow at a remarkable rate.
Very small pieces of shrimp, etc, might also work, as well as frozen invert
food.  Leathers don't require the same feeding regimen.

>Dendronepthya sp. or cauliflower coral.  These are frequently red.
>                        >> Lighting? Anything special?

Yeah, as little as possible.  It may also require feeding.

>green hammer coral - may not work well in your setup.
>                        >> Why won't it work well in my setup?

They need light.  (_Euphyllia ancora_)

>clavularia(sp?)         >> I don't have an invert book here so I don't 
>                           know what this is (ya', I'm lazy :)), any
>                           description/requirments?

Green star polyps, if my memory is not failing me.  This would be a good
one for your tank.

BTW, the scientific names are all being done from memory, so all spelling
flames will be directed to /dev/null.  Misidentifications are entirely my
fault, and might teach me a lesson for talking without verifying my facts
first.  Then again, maybe not.

(Exception:  Don't bother to tell me that elegans corals are _Euphyllia
picteti_.  The Mills book and the Manual of Marine Invertebrates both
lie about this one.)
-- 
patti-at-hosehead.hf.intel.com |  I don't speak for Intel, nor vice-versa.
   75555.767-at-compuserve.com |
             (503)-696-4358 |  A1: Yes, I'm the one with the big fishtank.
or just yell, "Hey, Patti!" |  A2: A lot, a lot, yes you can see it sometime.


Closed brain corals

by steve/celia.UUCP (Steve Tyree)
Date: 12 Nov 92
Newsgroup: alt.aquaria,rec.aquaria

In article <tom.721594974-at-dynamo.ecn.purdue.edu> tom-at-dynamo.ecn.purdue.edu (Tom McCain) writes:
-> I was wondering....  Does anyone who has closed brain or moon corals
-> under metal halide lighting notice that the coral closes down to the
-> point that you can see the skeletal rock during daylight periods?  I
-> have a friend that says his opens up to the point that he can see lots
-> of the tentacles, but as soon as daylight, actinic light or MH light
-> hit the tank it closes down.  Is this normal behavior for these types
-> of corals?  Thanks.

 These corals will open their polyps at night and extend tentacles out in 
search of food. That is normal behavior. Most non-fleshy stony corals ex-
tend their tentacles during the night. The polyps fold over or close during
daylight hours. This allows the symbiotic algaes to receive light.
 You should see the outer membrane during the day which is stretched out
covering the coral skeleton. If parts of the skeleton are visible (ie -
white calcium structure) than the coral has receded a little. You should
watch the tentacles at night and guard against any coral to coral battles
due to tentacle touching. 
 My red Favites sp. receded in one spot where an Euphyllia ancora stinging
tentacle touched it. The F. sp. was moved away and has completely recovered.
The E. ancora is still extending 4 inch stinging tentacles in the area which
previously contained the F. sp.. 

 Steve Tyree - Reef Breeder


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