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Contents:

  1. Reef Chemical
    by fssmith/venus.lerc.nasa.gov (Greg Smith (SVER)) (23 Jan 1992)
  2. Reef Chemical
    by patbob/techbook.com (Pat White) (27 Jan 92)
  3. Strontium Chloride (How Much)
    by brian/picasso.teradyne.com (Brian Hunter) (23 Jan 92)

Reef Chemical

by fssmith/venus.lerc.nasa.gov (Greg Smith (SVER))
Date: 23 Jan 1992
Newsgroup: rec.aquaria

In article <1992Jan22.171411.27349-at-ichips.intel.com>, daveo-at-omews18.intel.com (David O'Brien) writes...
>In article <19268-at-attain.Teradyne.COM> brian-at-picasso.icd.teradyne.com (Brian Hunter) writes:
>>I like to further Anthonies question as well, what about strontium and Molybdenum?
>>Do you who are using them just by them from kent marine (or other marine supplier)
>>or can they be bought as chemicals as well (from a chemical supplier that is).
> 
>I use SrCl2 for my Strontium addition.  (As per Julian Sprungs
>comments.  Also Tullock "A reef tank owners manual".)  
> 
>If you find the correct chemical to buy to add Molybdenum, let me know
>please.  I can figure out the dosage, but don't know which compound to
>start with.

Use MO3, Molybdenum Trioxide


Reef Chemical

by patbob/techbook.com (Pat White)
Date: 27 Jan 92
Newsgroup: rec.aquaria

In article <1992Jan25.033331.1-at-pomona.claremont.edu> efang-at-pomona.claremont.edu writes:
>	I just want to point out to those not that familiar with chemistry that
>the metal ions such as Strontium and Molybdenum often have more than one
>oxidation state (the charge on the free ion) and biological systems probably
>will react differently to them, so you can't just add chemicals willy-nilly to
>your tank to pump up trace levels, although if some dude says its ok in his
>book han he might be right. I don't know that much about the biology and
>chemistry of seawater, but it should be possible to add all the trace elements
>you want much more cheaply by adding the appropriate chemicals you mixed up
>yourself. You just have to find out which forms are appropriate.

	Duh.. didn't make the connection here till efang mentioned chemistry of
seawater.
	I can't find the copy I made, but Stephan Spotte published a book on
seawater formulas.  In it he mentioned all the various chemicals that one
would use (and in what proportions) to mix up these various synthetic seawater
mixes.  In addition to an analysis of natural seawater and a formula for making
a close synthetic one, the book also contained synthetic mixes that were
better for raising/breeding certain inverts.

	If people can't find the title of the book, I can dial up the (not so)
local library and see if I can figure out which one it was.


later,
Pat White (patbob-at-techbook.com)
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Strontium Chloride (How Much)

by brian/picasso.teradyne.com (Brian Hunter)
Date: 23 Jan 92
Newsgroup: rec.aquaria


Hi,

Well I went out and ordered SrCl2, hexhydrate (SrCl2.6H2O).
At 500gm this is probably a lifetime supply!

What I am not sure of is the hexhydrate part.  Julian gave instruction
for dosage in his column, but he did not mention hexhydrate.

Patti posted some numbers for CaCl2:

Rounding a little bit, the molecular weight of Ca++ is 40, and CaCl2 is 110.
Therefore, 36% of anhydrous CaCl2 is Ca++.  For dihydrate (CaCl2.2H2O) it is
27%, and for hexhydrate (CaCl2.6H2O) it is 18%.
 
The numbers for SrCl2 are different, if I am doing this right,
and that very questionable for SrCl2 the Sr is 55% and for the hexhydrate 
(SrCl2.6H2O) the Sr is ~33%.

Julian sugessted 50 gm (SrCl2) into 500 ml H2O, this would be 27.5 gm of Sr.
It would seem to follow that with hexhydrate one would disolve
83 gm (SrCl2.6H2O) into 500ml H2O for the same Sr concentration.

Am I doing this right?   I don't want to over dose and Julian wasn't
very specific and didn't include the chemical formula.

Thanks for any input

Brian Hunter

Ps: My Potasium Iodide arrived.  Expensive!  $18 for 25gm (Reagent)
    But 25gm will go a long way.


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