You are at The Krib ->Plants ->CO2 [E-mail]

Compressed Bottle Basics

Contents:

  1. CO2 Pressure Tank Setup
    by Bruce Towle <btowle/pacifier.com> (Sat, 01 Nov 1997)
  2. CO2 usage question
    by "Christopher Coleman" <christopher.coleman/worldnet.att.net> (Sun, 28 Feb 1999)
  3. Tipping CO2 bottles
    by George Booth <booth/frii.com> (Mon, 05 Jul 1999)
  4. CO2 - Liquid or Vapor
    by erdoz1 <erdoz1/wt.net> (Mon, 20 Sep 1999)
  5. Aquatic Plants Digest V3 #1112
    by Julie <jde/uoguelph.ca> (Fri, 25 Jun 1999)
  6. Sealing joints in CO2
    by Dave Gomberg <gomberg/wcf.com> (Sat, 26 Jun 1999)
  7. CO2 gone quickly
    by Wright Huntley <huntley1/home.com> (Sat, 26 Jun 1999)
  8. CO2 gone quickly
    by "Bill Giorgianni/Lynn Goldsmith" <bgandlg/capital.net> (Mon, 28 Jun 1999)
  9. Sodastream CO2 (APDigest V3 #1426)
    by "Claus Christensen - list-box" <clc-list/tropica.dk> (Sat, 04 Dec 1999)
  10. Full CO2 tank pressure
    by Dave Gomberg <gomberg/wcf.com> (Tue, 28 Dec 1999)
  11. CO2 Tank Pressure
    by erdoz1 <erdoz1/wt.net> (Tue, 28 Dec 1999)
  12. CO2 revisited -- Lessons Learned and Misc Stuff
    by FocaIPoint/aol.com (Wed, 30 Aug 2000)
  13. CO2 FAQ
    by "Schenck, Lyndle" <lschenck/dcscorp.com> (Thu, 21 Sep 2000)
  14. CO2 FAQ
    by "James Purchase" <jpurch/interlog.com> (Thu, 21 Sep 2000)
  15. CO2 FAQ
    by "Schenck, Lyndle" <lschenck/dcscorp.com> (Thu, 21 Sep 2000)

CO2 Pressure Tank Setup

by Bruce Towle <btowle/pacifier.com>
Date: Sat, 01 Nov 1997
Newsgroup: alt.aquaria,rec.aquaria.freshwater.plants

If you already have pressure tank co2 you can probably skip this post,
as this is really basic info.

***********************************************************************

A few weeks ago, I asked a lot of questions about how all of the CO2
equipment worked and fit together.  I got some info, and a lot of email
asking me to let them know how it worked when I got everything set up. 
So here goes:

I got a regulator from a welding supply store.  The first was on sale
for $50 and the other at the regular price of $70(I decided to set up
both of my tanks).

I got a 10lb tank for my 90gal and a 5lb tank for my 29gal. The welding
supply place will change the fitting on the regulator (the one that
attaches to the tank) to the type of gas you are using.  Each gas uses a
different fitting, so either buy the CO2 there or let them know that you
are using CO2 when you get the regulator.

Misc info offered by the welding supply guy:

1.  1lb of CO2 is 8.5 cu.ft. at normal temp and pressure.

2.  He sells a lot of CO2 to people with swimming pools to adjust their
water PH after adding all of the other chemicals that they need into the
pool.

I called around and finally found a place that sold small needle valves
and solenoid valves.  I had to order the solenoid valve, so I didn't get
to see it first.  So when it came in, I took the regulator with me when
I went to pick it up.  

The solenoid and the needle valve (ARO's NO1 model) both have all female
threads.  So you need other fittings to make everything connect
together.  The threads are all 1/8" on the valves.  The regulator on the
other hand had a 1/4" male fitting.

The store that I was buying the valves from ($11 for the needle and $24
for the solenoid) also sold all of the fittings that I needed.  I got
1/8" brass nipple(male on both ends) to connect the valves.  I got a
1/4" to 1/8" reducer to replace the 1/4" male thread on my regulator.

The solenoid valve that I got came in both 12v and 120 volt.  I had
ordered the 120v.  To do it again, I would go with the 12v and get an
adaptor.  The 120 volt solenoid has a 3-prong plugin that is not the
standard one (US).  The valve is about 1" square and the power supply
that is attached directly to the valve is also 1" square.  The prongs
are directly on the power supply ie. no cord.  The prongs look something
like this:

 _
| |

So I asked if he had an adaptor. What I got was a shell of the female
end of an extention cord. You can either cut the female end of an
extension cord off or what I did was find a replacement appliance cord
that has the male end but just bare wires at the other.  You push the
bare wires into the shell and tighten them down.  It took me about 10
minutes.  The shell also came with a long screw that runs through the
shell and into the solenoid valve so that it can't come unplugged.  It
worked nicely.

The store also had several kinds of fittings to attach air line to the
needle valve.  They have 1/8" male threads on one end and various types
of air line connectors on the other.  This will screw into the needle
valve.

The next problem, was to replace the 1/4" thread on the regulator with
my new 1/4"-1/8" reducer.  I didn't know what I could clamp on the
regulator or how much pressure I could use with various wrenches to get
the old one off.  After about 20 minutes I gave up.  

I had bought two needle valves and fittings at the store since I decided
to convert both of my aquariums.  I had to go back to the welding supply
place anyway, so I took my regulator.  When I bought my second
regulator, I asked him to replace the 1/4" fittings with my 1/4" to 1/8"
reducers.  He was happy to do this.  He said that they use lock-tight on
the threads.

I used pipe thread tape (the guy in the air supply store showed me that
some of the fittings already come with it), to try to make air tight
connections.

The regulator attaches to the tank and now had a 1/8" male fitting.  The
solenoid valve went next and I used a 1/8" nipple(both male) to attach
the needle valve.  The air line connector came next.  Take some air line
with you when you get the connectors (or know the size).  

I found that to adjust the regulator it is easier to unscrew the
adjustment knob (lowers the pressure) before you open the main tank
valve.  If you screw the knob in on the regulator (higher pressure) and
then open the tank valve, the pressure shown of the pressure indicator
doesn't go down as you turn the knob.  If you have the pressure low, you
can see the pressure rise when you screw the knob in on the regulator to
get the desired (I used 20psi) pressure.

The solenoid valve is open when power is on.  The needle valve that I
got (ARO's NO1) really doesn't have that fine of an adjustment.  I works
okay, but you might see if they sell a finer adjustment valve.  If I
turn the knob on the needle valve one turn, I could probably empty the
tank in a few minutes.  Just a small (as small as I can do) turn will go
from 1 bubble a second to several.  I messed with this for quite a while
to get the bubble count that I wanted.

It also seems that over time (an hour or two) the co2 flow slows and
then stablizes.  I started a 1 bubble/sec and in 4-5 hours, it seemed
that flow had stopped.  I turned the know up to 3-4 bubbles/second and
after an hour or so I had a constant 1 bubble/sec.

I put the solenoid valve setup on my 90gal and the setup with just the
needle valve on my 29 gal.  I tested the co2 in the evening an got about
17 ppm on both tanks.  The next morning, I tested again and found 17-20
ppm on the 29 gal and 7ppm on the 90gal.  I had run the co2 all night on
the 29 (no solenoid) and shut off the co2 with the lights on the 90 gal. 

My water is soft 3kh and the ph changes a lot with the amount of co2 in
the water (the reason I converted from DIY co2).  I now wish that I had
skipped the solenoid until I was ready (if ever) to add a PH controller.
The solenoid is nice to stop the co2 flow when changing water since I
run the airline into my fluval canister filters intake.  If the co2 runs
while I am changing the water, I get a lot of co2 in the filter when I
start everything back up.

Feel free to ask about anything that I have forgot.


-- 
Bruce Towle
btowle-at-pacifier.com


CO2 usage question

by "Christopher Coleman" <christopher.coleman/worldnet.att.net>
Date: Sun, 28 Feb 1999

Dennis wrote:
> I'm using a bottle that fills with about 2 lb. of CO2
> (by weight)  I'm trying to keep it at about one bubble
> per second.  However it seems like upon every refill
> I'm running out of CO2 faster.  How long does a bottle
> last for other people? My last refill did not last a week
> even.

Check for leaks upstream of your bubble counter. You can apply a
mild soap solution or kids bubble solution to suspected leaky areas
- - your connection points.  The solution will produce visible bubbles
at any leaky area.  I had a situation once where a "tiny" leak ( based
on the smallness of the bubbles originating from the bubble solution )
really gave off a lot of CO2. This happenned to be at the point where
main regulator connected to integrated needle valve.  Turning the needle
valve only about 1/6 turn solved the problem.

Also,  2 1/2 lb. cylanders should not be difficult for CO2 places to
fill  ( sometimes smaller quanties are ) but fullness can be determined
by a scale before and after filling.

Christopher Coleman
christopher.coleman@worldnet.att.net


Tipping CO2 bottles

by George Booth <booth/frii.com>
Date: Mon, 05 Jul 1999

>Date: Fri, 2 Jul 1999 17:12:41 -0400
>From: "James Purchase" <jpurch@interlog.com>
>Subject: Plug away...
>
>On the subject of CO2 bottles getting tipped over and causing problems, I
>saw something on the Bioplast web-site which is a neat idea and I've never
>seen it discussed here. They sell a very snazzy stainless steel jacket or
>"shell" for CO2 cylinders that is designed to hide it when your tank is in
>the living room. 

A foot long piece of Velcro attached to the aquarium cabinet makes a nice
way to secure CO2 bottles (yeast or pressurized gas). Secure yet easy to open.

George Booth, Ft. Collins, Colorado


CO2 - Liquid or Vapor

by erdoz1 <erdoz1/wt.net>
Date: Mon, 20 Sep 1999

In response to several posts regarding whether the CO2 in the high
pressure cylinder is liquid or vapor - It is...BOTH!

At a room temperature of 80 F, the vapor pressure is ~ 880 psia, and the
liquid and vapor phases coexist in the two-phase zone.  The proportions
of liquid and vapor will vary according to the total mass contained
within the closed system.
As CO2 is withdrawn from the cylinder, the liquid fraction decreases and
vapor fraction increases.  The pressure remains constant matching the
vapor pressure of CO2 at the room temperature..(I have assumed that
cylinder temperature equilibrates with that of the room).   When the
last drop of liquid disappears, the system operates in the single phase
zone and the pressure will drop according to the standard gas
relationship (PV=zNRT) .  At pressures below 75 psia, the solid- vapor
phase must be considered, but this is outside our discussion.  BTW, the
Gibbs Phase Rule is v= c-p-2.

Normally, the CO2 cyclinder should be charged by weight, to ensure that
a vapor pocket is left so that the vapor can disengage from the liquid
before flowing to the regulator.  This is important, because the liquid
will produce a much greater refrigeration effect than the vapor when
reduced in pressure (crank up the regulator flow and notice how cold it
gets) - this may result in the regulator valve seat "icing" with
resultant poor performance.  This particularly important for CO2 since
the equilibrium at below ~ 70 psia downstream of the regulator is
between the gas and the solid and will make "snow" (which is why this
gas is
particularly hard to regulate at low flows & high pressure drops).

The CO2 cylinder should be oriented vertically, but at the low flows the
aquarist uses, a slight tilt is not critical.

One more thing - if you store the cylinder at ~ 100 degrees F (NOT
RECOMMENDED!!!), the cylinder will now be operating at about 1100 psia
in the critical zone where the liquid and vapor properties are
indistinguishable.

Your friend;
Tibor E.


Aquatic Plants Digest V3 #1112

by Julie <jde/uoguelph.ca>
Date: Fri, 25 Jun 1999

> From: Patrick Ng <nghakkong@netscape.net>
> Subject: CO2 gone quickly

> and how do I find out where the leakage is?
> 
> Anyone can shed some light on it?
> 
> Thanks!
> 
> Patrick Ng

Hi Patrick, you're right, sounds like leak.  You can find out where the
leak is by dropping a bit of soapy water on the joints of your regulator
and other connections.  A leak will cause the soapy water solution to form
bubbles and be detected.

Julie


Sealing joints in CO2

by Dave Gomberg <gomberg/wcf.com>
Date: Sat, 26 Jun 1999

At 03:48 AM 6/26/99 -0400,  Patrick Ng asked:
> what sort of sealant should I use to seal the leakage?

Go to a bar/beverage equipment place and get "NYLOC gasket thread sealant
and assembly lube".  It is expensive per ounce (about $5) but solves the
problem.   If you are lucky someone will give you a drop (that's all it
takes).   If you live near SF I will give you a drop.  Actually I can mail
you a drop if we can figure out some way to ship it.   You can guess the
consistency if I tell you my pet name for it is "whale snot".  


- --
Dave Gomberg, San Francisco            mailto:gomberg@wcf.com
The latest in CO2 news:     http://www.wcf.com/co2iron 
Tropica MasterGrow in the USA:      http://www.wcf.com/tropica 
- -----------------------------------------------------------------


CO2 gone quickly

by Wright Huntley <huntley1/home.com>
Date: Sat, 26 Jun 1999

WOW!

All the experts here advising the use of Teflon water-pipe tape make me
nervous about saying this: 

Don't do it!

Teflon cold-flows a bit and acts as a lubricant in threaded joints, so it
can actually help stop leaks. It's refusal to "wet" is why it is used for
*water* pipes and other liquids. Never, ever use it on high-pressure gas
lines.

The problem is that the tendency to shred can cause a catastrophe when some
bits eventually leak into a needle valve or regulator. It is better on the
low-pressure side of a regulator, but I'll use pipe compound there, rather
than risk a dead needle valve. Flare or compression fittings are better
anyway, for such service.

I learned this over 30 years ago, when I worked for HP Labs in Palo Alto.
After several disasters, it became company policy that teflon tape was not
to be used on any dry fitting, ever. AFAIK, the reason is still valid,
today. You may get away with it for years, but then...

Wright

- -- 
Wright Huntley, Fremont CA, USA, 510 494-8679  huntleyone at home dot com

      To all gun-control advocates: Please just place a sign
      on your front lawn that reads: "This home is gun-free."


CO2 gone quickly

by "Bill Giorgianni/Lynn Goldsmith" <bgandlg/capital.net>
Date: Mon, 28 Jun 1999

> Date: Sun, 27 Jun 1999 13:33:09 -0400
> From: Johan Henckens <johan@mmdg.org>
> Subject: Re: CO2 gone quickly
> 
> >
> > Date: Sat, 26 Jun 1999 13:17:38 -0700
> > From: Wright Huntley <huntley1@home.com>
> > Subject: Re: CO2 gone quickly
> >
> > WOW!
> >
> > All the experts here advising the use of Teflon water-pipe tape make me
> > nervous about saying this:
> >
> > Don't do it!

snip...

> I don't know about the general availability of the yellow tape but I
> know Home Depot carries it.
> 
> Johan
> johan@mmdg.org
> 
> I concur with Johan. The yellow tef tape is made specifically to meet the
> demands of natural gas and should be well suited to your task. It's also
> available at our True Value Stores here in upstate N.Y.

                                     Bill G
                         assistant manager Noble True Value

I'm happy to have everyone agree that pipe compound is superior, but do note
that natural gas is a *very* low pressure system, usually by law. The
disasters I mentioned happened at 100 psi or above. The only problem with
using any kind of teflon tape in the low-pressure (post regulator) side of
your system probably is a permanently clogged needle valve. If you are
careful in applying it, as Johan said, it *is* pretty safe. 

The same goes for pipe compound. It is usually petroleum-based, and could
give a nasty surface film in your tank if used carelessly.

Maybe that would cut some surface CO2 loss? :^)

The bottom line is that use of teflon tape in high-pressure gas line
fittings should not be recommended, just like using solder on 120Vac
electrical fittings. You may get away with it for years, but you would never
get Underwriters Lab to approve it. It really isn't safe.

Wright

- -- 
Wright Huntley, Fremont CA, USA, 510 494-8679  huntleyone at home dot com

      To all gun-control advocates: Please just place a sign
      on your front lawn that reads: "This home is gun-free."


Sodastream CO2 (APDigest V3 #1426)

by "Claus Christensen - list-box" <clc-list/tropica.dk>
Date: Sat, 04 Dec 1999

Re: Sodastream CO2 (APDigest V3 #1426)

Dear Matt

>Has anyone from the UK on this list tried using 'Sodastream' CO2 cylinders as 
>a means of fertilising their aquarium?

I am not from the UK but from Denmark, but we use UK-Sodastream bottles!
I have used them now 25 years! 
The CO2 they contain is absolute pure enough! 
The pressure is high! It is liquid! A little under 60 BAR!
The cylinders do not take a standard sized fitting! That is the main problem!
What I do is that I bye the valve used for the Sodastream machine! I got it
directly from the English manufacture trough the Danish importer!
You can put an air hose direct on the valve! 
The valve can be a little difficult to use without giving too much CO2.
A little practice helps! I have made “some mechanism” to prevent to much
to go in the aquarium!
I use an upside-down small tank to ad the CO2 to my tanks!
But have also used other solutions.
I have also made home-made fittings with variable flow valve, pressure reducing
module etc.
But because of the high pressure it is not easy to get it tight enough! 

This is the cheapest way to get CO2 to smaller tanks!

Good luck!

Claus

- -----------------------------------------------------
Claus Christensen           (mailto:clc@tropica.dk)
Tropica Aquarium Plants A/S http://www.tropica.com  
Denmark
- ---------------------------------------------------


Full CO2 tank pressure

by Dave Gomberg <gomberg/wcf.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Dec 1999

At 03:48 PM 12/28/1999 -0500, Eric asked:
>    I just got a 20# CO2 bottle (full) and an O2 regulator for it.  By the 
>"dummy" lines on the regulator, I am below 1/3 full.  I figure this is 
>erroneous because CO2 must compress at a different pressure than O2.  Does 
>anyone know what the tank pressure should be at for a full 20# CO2 cylinder?

That is an interesting concept using an O2 regulator on a CO2 cylinder, I
am not sure it will work and would not advise it.   That said, a full
cylinder has a pressure around 800psi (say 700-950 depending on the
temperature and gauge calibration).  The best way to tell how much CO2 is
left is weigh it and subtract the tare stamped on the shoulder of the tank.
- --
Dave Gomberg, San Francisco            mailto:gomberg@wcf.com
NEW Planted Aquaria Magazine:        http://www.wcf.com/pam
My aquarium plant supply store:      http://www.wcf.com/store

- -----------------------------------------------------------------


CO2 Tank Pressure

by erdoz1 <erdoz1/wt.net>
Date: Tue, 28 Dec 1999


Date: Tue, 28 Dec 1999 13:13:52 EST
From: EFPav@aol.com
Subject: CO2 Tank Pressure

    I just got a 20# CO2 bottle (full) and an O2 regulator for it.  By the
"dummy" lines on the regulator, I am below 1/3 full.  I figure this is
erroneous because CO2 must compress at a different pressure than O2.  Does
anyone know what the tank pressure should be at for a full 20# CO2 cylinder?

Thanks

Eric

Ah, Eric, it's questions like yours that make me feel young again (jk).  The short
answer is that iff the pressure is around 900 psig, you still have plenty. The bad
news is that you can't tell how much (as explained below).

1) Let's assume your CO2 tank is reasonably "full".  So inside, there is a mixture
of both CO2 liquid and vapor.  As long as both liquid and vapor are present,
the pressure in the tank will depend only on the temperature (not "fullness")
as shown in the table below:

Tank Temperature        Cylinder Pressure
(F)                                (PSIA)
69                                837.8
71                                859.8
75                                905.1
77                                928.4
79                                952.2
81                                976.5

The gauge pressure (PSIG) is approximately 14.7 psi less than the values in the
table above.   Note that pressure climbs rapidly with temperature (which is why
you shouldnt leave a CO2 cyclinder in the trunk on a summer day -hopefully the
relief valve will bleed the pressure off).

2) As the CO2 is used, the pressure in the tank will "attempt to drop" and a small
amount of liquid vaporizes to restore the pressure back to equilibrium. The
temperature drops a slight amount also, and heat leaks in from the surroundings to
restore the temperature as well).  So as CO2 is used, the liquid level in the cyclinder
drops.

3) When the last drop of CO2 liquid vaporizes, the system is vapor only,
and the pressure WILL DEPEND on "Fullness" according to the gas relation

       P  =  (lbs of CO2/44)*Z*R*T/V

where:

P=pressure (PSIA)
(the constant 44 is the molecular weight for CO2)
R=Gas constant (10.731 in this case)
T= absolute temperature in Rankine (degrees F +460)
V= Tank  volume (Ft3)
Z = compressibility factor (a "fudge" factor to correct for nonideality at high pressure)

You can tell when your cylinder has used up all the liquid, because the pressure drops.
But since most aquariums use very small amounts of CO2, several months of CO2
supply are stll available.  I generally refill at about 200 psig.  I don't recommend letting
the pressure getting below 100 psig, because a third "snow" phase can form  under the
right conditions (44 psia?) which will screw up the regulator (plus how accurate are those regulators
anyway at the end of the scale anyway).

Happy Growing
Erdoz


CO2 revisited -- Lessons Learned and Misc Stuff

by FocaIPoint/aol.com
Date: Wed, 30 Aug 2000

I think I previously mentioned to the list I recently added a pressurized CO2 
system to my 120 gallon tank. Well, the following constitutes lessons 
learned.  Simple stuff that was not addressed (as far as I can see) on 
aquatic URLs or here on the list.


First -- Make sure that the regulator is on tight, and I mean tight. Use that 
washer you get every time you get a refill and throw the old one out. Don't 
use Channel Lock pliers to tighten the nut. Use a 12 inch Crescent wrench. 
You are not going to harm the regulator using too much muscle power. Y will 
not strip threads if the regulator is of good quality and if you do not use 
Teflon tape. 

Second -- When you get your new CO2 system, plan on not having enough tubing. 
I've tried several different types, and the ONE to get as far as I'm 
concerned is tubing from a NAPA auto parts store. Get the stuff used for 
pressurized windshield washer lines. It cost me 32 cents a foot plus tax.  
The tubing you get from Home Depot and other places is too brittle, and CO2 
will probably corrode it, resulting in leaks.

Third -- Do NOT use Teflon tape or any other goop around the regulator to 
tank threaded connection. This is a pressure gas fitting, and not for 
liquids. Teflon will simply make a gas leak more rather than less likely.

Fourth -- check each connection for leaks. Use a few drops of liquid dish 
detergent in an empty Windex or similar bottle and spray on the connections 
while the system is running, checking for bubbles of escaping gas.

What's the basis of these suggestions? Three five pound refills of CO2 in one 
month, and three discussions with the Welding Supply shop manager who sold me 
the gas at $13.50 for five pounds. Hopefully he will not now see me for 9 - 0 
months. And yes, I do confess.  I AM mechanically challenged, and do learn 
the hard way.

I've considered some sort of electronic pH linked controller system but, I'll 
wait on that. At one to two bubbles a second in a 120 gallon, it's not likely 
that the fish are going to be in trouble with CO2 poisoning.  But sure, if 
necessary, I'd eventually spring for the extra bucks for one. But all that 
would do is complicate the system further, and increase the chance that 
something is gonna break or malfunction. SO I'm trying to keep things as 
simple as possible.

An oxymoron -- *A comfortable Death*. Nothing comfortable about it unless the 
soon to be expired is so loaded on meds, he, she or it is virtually comatose. 
I do not think it matters to the fish anyway. But not being a fish, I have no 
empirical way of knowing.

David


CO2 FAQ

by "Schenck, Lyndle" <lschenck/dcscorp.com>
Date: Thu, 21 Sep 2000

A good second regulator to reduce CO2 pressure from the 40 PSI from the
primary regulator to a more manageable 0 - 15 PSIG is the ARO 127112-820.
The last time I bought these they were around $30 with a 0-15 PSIG gauge.  I
have two systems in service with no problems.  These might provide an option
for DIYers that are not so comfortable adapting welding or second hand
hardware.  One company that sells these mail order can be reached at 410
536-4805.

Lyndle Schenck


CO2 FAQ

by "James Purchase" <jpurch/interlog.com>
Date: Thu, 21 Sep 2000

Time to eat crow again........ ;-)

Using the ARO model number that Lyndle quoted (ARO 127112-820), I continued
my yahoo searching and found several on-line catalogues from companies that
sell ARO regulators. I found several similar models, but not an exact match.
I returned to Ingersoll-Rand's web site and looked in the "literature"
section of the ARO division. There are several PDF files for regulators, one
of which (http://www.irco.com/aro/downloads/R271XX.PDF) might describe the
regulator Lyndle mentioned. It is available with an output close to that
mentioned by Lyndle.

However, in the PDF file describing the regulator, I notice the following
caution:
- ---------
WARNING - Use with industrial compressed air systems only. Do not use with
bottled gas products or fluids. Misapplications can result in component
failure.
- ---------

Is this something that we should be concerned with when designing/using a
CO2 system??? The CO2 we use is a bottled gas......

James Purchase
Toronto


CO2 FAQ

by "Schenck, Lyndle" <lschenck/dcscorp.com>
Date: Thu, 21 Sep 2000

James Wrote:

	Time to eat crow again........ ;-) Using the ARO model number that
Lyndle quoted (ARO 127112-820), I continued my 	yahoo searching and found
several on-line catalogues from companies that sell ARO regulators. I found
several similar 	models, but not an exact match. I returned to
Ingersoll-Rand's web site and looked in the "literature" section of the ARO
division. There are several PDF files for regulators, one of which
(<http://www.irco.com/aro/downloads/R271XX.PDF>) 	might describe the
regulator Lyndle mentioned. It is available with an output close to that
mentioned by Lyndle. However, 	in the PDF file describing the regulator, I
notice the following caution: --------- WARNING - Use with industrial
compressed air systems only. Do not use with bottled gas products or fluids.
Misapplications can result in component 	failure. --------- Is this
something that we should be concerned with when designing/using a CO2
system??? The CO2 	we use is a bottled gas...... James Purchase Toronto


James made another good point.  This mini-regulator is not designed to
connect directly to a CO2 bottle!!!!!!!!  In fact the MAX inlet pressure is
250 PSIG.

I use this regulator down stream to reduce the 40 PSIG from the CO2
regulator that is connected on the bottle to a very constant 2 PSIG to the
solenoid/needle valve manifold.  This set up makes a FOR REAL two stage
system because you have two regulators.

I know its overkill and most won't want to spend the money.  I ONLY got in
to this after my Sandpoint system (that cost over $200 BTW) dumped into my
planted Rainbow tank killing a lot of fish.  I didn't have the benefit of
the list info at that time so I didn't even know why it happened.

Lyndle Schenck


Up to CO2 <- Plants <- The Krib
This page was last updated 17 February 2002