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Lilaeopsis

Contents:

  1. No Title
    by David Randall <76535.2776-at-compuserve.com> (12 May 95)
  2. Lillaeopsis and Phosphate Resins
    by krandall-at-world.std.com (Karen A Randall) (Wed, 4 Dec 1996)
  3. "Micro Sword"
    by krandall/world.std.com (Wed, 14 Oct 1998)
  4. Glosso
    by "Dixon, Steven T. (Exchange)" <stdixon/ben.bechtel.com> (Thu, 5 Nov 1998)
  5. Glosso
    by ac554/freenet.carleton.ca (David Whittaker) (Thu, 5 Nov 1998)
  6. Glosso
    by ac554/freenet.carleton.ca (David Whittaker) (Thu, 5 Nov 1998)
  7. Hard/soft water, Glossostigma/Lilaeopsis
    by krandall/world.std.com (Mon, 09 Nov 1998)
  8. (No Title)
    by ()
  9. November Summary
    by Neil Frank <nfrank/mindspring.com> (Mon, 30 Nov 1998)
  10. Lillaeopsis
    by krandall/world.std.com (Thu, 23 Sep 1999)

Lilaeopsis ruthiana, a New Zealand native which forms a compact turf.
photo by John Clayton

(No Title)

by David Randall <76535.2776-at-compuserve.com>
Date: 12 May 95

 David,

 >> I would really like to get hold of some of this stuff.
 I don't remember seeing it described in any of my books (can anyone provide a
picture ref.?, unless it is the same as L.novea-zelandiae) <<

 I know that the books all show L. novae-zelandae, but from what I've been
told, most (if not all) of what is sold in this country is brazilliensis.  It
looks similar enough that I'm not sure I could tell the difference.

 L. sp. "Mauritius" is fairly new, and available only from Tropica, as far as
I know.

 Lillaeopsis of one species or another is usually available commercially,
often under the name "Micro Sword" in pots. This is probably the best way to
get it, since a clump like that is easier to plant than when the plants have
spread out through the gravel in a tank.  It spreads pretty quickly, so even
if you just buy a couple of pots, and divide each into a couple of pieces, it
should fill in before too long.


Lillaeopsis and Phosphate Resins

by krandall-at-world.std.com (Karen A Randall)
Date: Wed, 4 Dec 1996

 Subject: Lilaeopsis observations, and a phosphate removal media 

> The plant, definitely Lilaeopsis, was labeled as Lilaeopsis
> novea-zelandiae. I thought this would be perfect for such a smal
> since that species does not grow very tall. I soon learned that 
> mislabeled, or that this species grows differently in my aquariu
> specimens in my tank are now about 8 inches tall, or over twice 
> the literature suggests. This stuff (can anyone suggest what spe
> might be?) went absolutely nuts in this aquarium. From one clump
> months ago, it has now propagated to take over nearly all the av
> surface space. In fact it is almost choking out plantings of Sag
> (subulata, I think) and Echinodorus tenellus. <snip> 

> The reference materials I have (Baensch vol. 2, James, Rataj/Hor
> unanimously say this plant does well in very bright light and ri
> substrate. My substrate qualifies as rich, but the lighting isn'
> bright, 

Your plant is probabaly L. braziliensis.  It tends to grow taller 
in lower light conditions.  The brighter the light, the shorter it 
grows,  In the front of my 70G tank where it receives direct 
light, it stays quite short.  But it also grows around the base of 
all the other plants, and in the shady areas, it _does_ get quite 
a bit taller.


"Micro Sword"

by krandall/world.std.com
Date: Wed, 14 Oct 1998

>Does any one know of any way to get this plant to grow to its "carpet"
>potential, I have a bunch that has spread somewhat with small runners.
>What I have read is that it likes bright light, yet in my tank (29g 60w,
>sand substrate) the plant spreads to areas of lower light?? Any Hints?

If you are talking about Lillaeopsis, I find that it grows better with
light levels closer to 3w/g.  It also seems to prefer water a little harder
than Glossostigma, making it a good option for those who have problems with
that plant.  It does best in a fine substrate, as it has a hard time
staying rooted in coarse materials.  As long as part of it has bright
light, the stand will also creep around into shadier areas of the tank.  In
these areas, the blades will be longer, but so will the space between blades.

Karen Randall
Aquatic Gardeners Association


Glosso

by "Dixon, Steven T. (Exchange)" <stdixon/ben.bechtel.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Nov 1998

Writght wrote regarding Glosso:  >>> I think I found out why mine never
did well. Most of my plants are in moderate-to-hard water. Glossostigma
seems to flourish across the bay in SF ultra-soft water. It looks like
it just does not like harder water.  Any confirmation for this
observation?>>>
That's exactly what Karen Randall told me during her presentation here
in San Francisco, Wright.  She said she cannot grow Glosso in her hard
Boston water, but that she can grow a Lilliaeopsis (sp.?) lawn quite
easily.  In soft water, I have tried unsuccessfully for years under all
sorts of conditions to grow a Lilliaeopsis lawn.  Even the mighty "muddy
water" veteran, George Booth, once told he couldn't grow a Lilliaeopsis
lawn in his soft Rocky Mountain runoff water!
So I would like to ask the group, have any of you grown a Lilliaeopsis
lawn in really soft water?  If yes, I would love to hear any details you
might have.
Regards, Steve Dixon 

------------------------------


Glosso

by ac554/freenet.carleton.ca (David Whittaker)
Date: Thu, 5 Nov 1998

Steven Dixon asked...

>So I would like to ask the group, have any of you grown a Lilliaeopsis
>lawn in really soft water?  If yes, I would love to hear any details you
>might have.

Yes, in plain fine aquarium gravel. GH = 2 or 3, KH = 2, DIY CO2,
PMDD, <2 watts of fluorescent lighting per gallon, accompanied by
a bit of Bacopa caroliniana, rotalla indica, a few E. latifolia,
and a very light fishload in a 15 gallon tank. A very thick lawn
developed with circulation provided by an AquaClear 200.

- --
Dave Whittaker
ac554@FreeNet.Carleton.ca

------------------------------


Glosso

by ac554/freenet.carleton.ca (David Whittaker)
Date: Thu, 5 Nov 1998

Steven Dixon asked...

>So I would like to ask the group, have any of you grown a Lilliaeopsis
>lawn in really soft water?  If yes, I would love to hear any details you
>might have.

Yes, in plain fine aquarium gravel. GH = 2 or 3, KH = 2, DIY CO2,
PMDD, <2 watts of fluorescent lighting per gallon, accompanied by
a bit of Bacopa caroliniana, rotalla indica, a few E. latifolia,
and a very light fishload in a 15 gallon tank. A very thick lawn
developed with circulation provided by an AquaClear 200.

- - --
Dave Whittaker
ac554@FreeNet.Carleton.ca

- ------------------------------


Hard/soft water, Glossostigma/Lilaeopsis

by krandall/world.std.com
Date: Mon, 09 Nov 1998

>Steve writes:
>
><snip>> That's exactly what Karen Randall told me during her presentation
here
>>  in San Francisco, Wright.  She said she cannot grow Glosso in her hard
>>  Boston water, but that she can grow a Lilliaeopsis (sp.?) lawn quite
>>  easily.<<snip>

Bob Dixon wrote:

>So, can anyone give a cut-off point between the two, or the preferred
range of
>each?  If I wanted to get a foreground "lawn" going of one or the other, do I
>just plant a little of each and see which one takes over?

That's the approach I'd take.  As one person wrote, there's no "magic"
cut-off point between hard and soft water, and there are _many_ other
variables.  And as we've seen, for every "rule" there's an exception.  I'd
definitely try both, and see what worked best for me.

Someone also questioned what species we're talking about with Lilaeopsis.
There are a number of different species, including at least one U.S.
native.  The commercially available stuff is usually sold under the name L.
novaezelandea, but to my knowledge, that plant is not in commercial
propagation.  Most of the Lilaeopsis sold is probably L. braziliensis.
Telling them all apart is extremely difficult.


(No Title)

by

Karen Randall
Aquatic Gardeners Association

------------------------------


November Summary

by Neil Frank <nfrank/mindspring.com>
Date: Mon, 30 Nov 1998

[...]

Re: Lilaeopsis 
There are 2 species in the trade: L. brasiliensis (aka L. novae-zelandiae)
and L. carolinensis. There may actually be one from NZ, but it is not in
the hobby. The one we usually see is from Southern Brazil and neighboring
areas. I have the one from carolina - it is growing OK in my soft water;
with CO2; 2.5wpg, temp ~80F.  It would probably be a good foreground plant,
but for my setups, it is a much slower grower compared to Echinodorus
tenellus.



Lillaeopsis

by krandall/world.std.com
Date: Thu, 23 Sep 1999

>The lillaeopsis which I transplanted from
>my silica-sand-and-jobes-sticks tank, where it was stagnant, has taken
>off.  However, it seems to like to travel in straight lines, and I want it
>to clump up.  Also, when I pull up one of the long chains, it's nearly
>impossible to replant because of the billion little plantlets and my big
>clumsy fingers.  Any trimming hints?  How do you all replant this stuff?  
>Is it okay to cut the runners periodically just to keep it in manageable
>chunks?  Any way to make it grow non-linearly?  How do you thin it out?


AFAIK, Lillaeopsis always runs linearly.  It loops entirely around my 70G
tank, including through dense shade in the back.  Eventually, it will
thicken into a lawn on its own.  As far as replanting those pesky pieces
that get pulled up is concerned, wad them up like a brillo pad, and anchor
them on the bottom with a little gravel or a small stone.  They'll take
care of the rest before you would believe!

Oh, and yes, you can cut the runners when ever you want.

Karen


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