You are at The Krib ->Tank Hardware [E-mail]

Clear PVC

Contents:

  1. Clear PVC Pipe?
    by laurence-at-cco.caltech.edu (Dustin Laurence) (12 May 1994)
  2. Tank, lights, CO2 kits
    by busko/stsci.edu (Ivo Busko) (Fri, 14 Jan 2000)
  3. Aquatic Plants Digest V4 #490
    by David Luckie <davidluckie/yahoo.com> (Tue, 22 Aug 2000)

Clear PVC Pipe?

by laurence-at-cco.caltech.edu (Dustin Laurence)
Date: 12 May 1994
Newsgroup: rec.aquaria

You can order clear PVC from US Plastics.  I think their address and
phone are in the back of the reefkeeper's FAQ.  It is much more
expensive than regular PVC, and they probably do not have sizes as
large as for regular pipe.

4" clear PVC would be extremely pricey or not available, I would
guess, but their catalog is free so you might as well check.

Dustin

-- 
                     The Aquaria archive is located in the /pub/aquaria
                     directory at ftp.cco.caltech.edu


Tank, lights, CO2 kits

by busko/stsci.edu (Ivo Busko)
Date: Fri, 14 Jan 2000

Chester Wong wrote:
<snip>
>I would like to use an overflow box, but I hate the retrofit type...the ones
>where you have to start a siphon.  I would rather donate a small corner of the
>tank for this.  I see that all-glass has their "twin-flo" models that have the
>corner piece already installed and the holes already drilled in the glass.  Is
>this worth it?  I think all-glass also sells annealed glass aquariums where you
>can drill the hole.  Should I look into doing that myself?
<snip>

I believe an overflow box is not necessary nor desirable in a planted aquarium.
Overflows such as the one in all-glass aquariums don't seem appropriate either,
due to the amount of water splashing they create. Since you are starting from
scratch, why don't just drill a hole in the back panel, just below water level, 
and fit it with an elbow pointing upright ? Fit the elbow end with some sort 
of strainer and that's it. No syphon to start, no cumbersome equipment to 
clean inside the tank. You can even add a few more simple plumbing parts to 
provide such things as additional security against clogging, and a simultaneous 
underwater intake. To make it less conspicuous, use transparent PVC parts 
(such as in http://www.savko.com/).

- -Ivo Busko
 Baltimore, MD


  


Aquatic Plants Digest V4 #490

by David Luckie <davidluckie/yahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Aug 2000

>> David Luckie writes:

>> I've seen black PVC in the drainage and irrigation
>>  section of Lowe's and Home Depot.

> The reason it is in the drainage and irrigation 
> section is because it isn't PVC.  It's ABS, and in 
> the US is illegal to use for supply plumbing.  
> In continuous contact with water it will leach 
> chemicals used in plastic manufacture known 
> as "plasticizers".  These things are toxic, and I 
> would strongly recommend against using it in your 
> aquarium.

No, I know the difference between ABS and PVC.  ;) 
This is black Schedule 40.  It is stamped on the side.
I saw 4" and 2" sizes, with some slotted 4" to boot. 
Maybe it's only available around here--many houses are
built on pilings to survive storm surge, and exposed,
white PVC plumbing looks awful on a half-a-million
vacation dream home. 

I was in the planning stages of building a waterfall
for the pond, and needed something to carry the water
from the filter outfall to the waterfall's basin.  I
ended up using grey polybutylene because it was
flexible and would have less friction head.

Regards,

David (keeping a close eye on Hurricane Debby here on
the Gulf Coast...)


__________________________________________________


Up to Tank Hardware <- The Krib
This page was last updated 17 February 2002