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Nannacara anomala

Here is a spawning article by Tom Price, from the Greater Seattle Aquarium Society.

Contents:

  1. Those wacky nanacara anomolas
    by Ken Laidlaw <kl/jach.hawaii.edu> (Mon, 31 Mar 1997)
  2. Those wacky nanacara anomolas
    by Thomas Price <tprice/u.washington.edu> (Sun, 30 Mar 1997)
  3. No-luck Nannacara
    by Thomas Price <tprice/u.washington.edu> (Tue, 21 Oct 1997)
  4. No-luck Nannacara
    by "Darren J. Hanson" <djhanson/calweb.com> (Tue, 21 Oct 1997)
  5. No-luck Nannacara
    by Stuart <stuart/snoopers.karoo.co.uk> (Wed, 22 Oct 1997)
  6. Welcome and a bit about N.anomala
    by "Darren J. Hanson" <djhanson/calweb.com> (Mon, 27 Jul 1998)
  7. Two Questions
    by "Helen Burns" <helen.burns/bigwig.net> (Sun, 2 May 1999)
  8. Re:Two Questions
    by ProfPhilo/aol.com (Tue, 4 May 1999)
  9. sexing N. aureocephalus
    by Mike & Diane Wise <apistowise/bewellnet.com> (Fri, 10 Dec 1999)
  10. Interbreeding
    by Mike & Diane Wise <apistowise/bewellnet.com> (Tue, 20 Jun 2000)
  11. N. Anomala
    by Mike & Diane Wise <apistowise/bewellnet.com> (Fri, 10 Mar 2000)
  12. Nannacara Anomala
    by Mike & Diane Wise <apistowise/bewellnet.com> (Sat, 26 Aug 2000)
  13. Nannacara Anomala
    by BigJohnW/webtv.net (John Wubbolt) (Sat, 26 Aug 2000)
  14. 'Big yellow band' Apisto?
    by Mike & Diane Wise <apistowise/bewellnet.com> (Tue, 10 Apr 2001)
  15. N. anomala question
    by Mike & Diane Wise <apistowise/bewellnet.com> (Fri, 03 Nov 2000)


Males

Photo by Erik Olson


female with fry

Photo by Helen Burns

Those wacky nanacara anomolas

by Ken Laidlaw <kl/jach.hawaii.edu>
Date: Mon, 31 Mar 1997
To: Thomas Price <tprice/u.washington.edu>

Hi,
Very interesting story regarding N.anomala.  I too have observed very
diligent parenting.  One time I lifted the mother and eggs in a pot
straight into another tank as the female was alomost dead from fighting
with the male.  She managed to lead the fry around with not much left of
her fins.

As to leaving her out for six months the fry should be pretty much adult
themselves by that time so the female would not recognise them as fry.

Cheers,
Ken.L


On Sun, 30 Mar 1997, Thomas Price wrote:

> Date: Sun, 30 Mar 1997 22:32:25 -0800 (PST)
> From: Thomas Price <tprice-at-u.washington.edu>
> To: apisto-at-aquaria.net
> Subject: Those wacky nanacara anomolas
> 
> 
> I wanted to share some strange brooding behavior exhibited by my NA's.
> After they recenlty bred in my community tank, the parents began to
> squabble.  They actually divided the brood between themselves, with dad
> and mom each having approximately half in different territories.  After
> another day or two, dad had the entire brood and was showing the darkened
> nuptial coloration normally exhibited by mom.  Mom was so harassed that I
> had to remove her to let her grow a new right pectoral fin.  
> 
> While she was out of the tank, dad carried on the parent thing.  He
> defended his territory from the other fish, although not quite as
> dilligently as mom.  After a couple of weeks (like 4), I re-introduced
> mom. She started squabbling over the kids.  Her nuptial coloration
> returned and soon she had half of the brood back.
> 
>   I was just a little surprised that she would defend the kids after such
> a long time, although she is a great mother.  Does anyone know what the
> upper limit is on this sort of behavior?  I'm tempted to move her into a
> tank where I am letting some fry grow out (they're about 6 mos old) to see
> what she will do.
> 
> Just curious.
>  Tom
>  
>  Work Phone: (206)-543-1075             Physical Mail: Box 352700
>  Fax:        (206)-543-1543                            University of Washington
>  Home Page : http://www.ce.washington.edu/~tep         Seattle, WA
>                                                        98195
> 
> 
> 
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Those wacky nanacara anomolas

by Thomas Price <tprice/u.washington.edu>
Date: Sun, 30 Mar 1997
To: apisto/aquaria.net


I wanted to share some strange brooding behavior exhibited by my NA's.
After they recenlty bred in my community tank, the parents began to
squabble.  They actually divided the brood between themselves, with dad
and mom each having approximately half in different territories.  After
another day or two, dad had the entire brood and was showing the darkened
nuptial coloration normally exhibited by mom.  Mom was so harassed that I
had to remove her to let her grow a new right pectoral fin.  

While she was out of the tank, dad carried on the parent thing.  He
defended his territory from the other fish, although not quite as
dilligently as mom.  After a couple of weeks (like 4), I re-introduced
mom. She started squabbling over the kids.  Her nuptial coloration
returned and soon she had half of the brood back.

  I was just a little surprised that she would defend the kids after such
a long time, although she is a great mother.  Does anyone know what the
upper limit is on this sort of behavior?  I'm tempted to move her into a
tank where I am letting some fry grow out (they're about 6 mos old) to see
what she will do.

Just curious.
 Tom
 
 Work Phone: (206)-543-1075             Physical Mail: Box 352700
 Fax:        (206)-543-1543                            University of Washington
 Home Page : http://www.ce.washington.edu/~tep         Seattle, WA
                                                       98195



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No-luck Nannacara

by Thomas Price <tprice/u.washington.edu>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 1997
To: apisto/majordomo.pobox.com

On Tue, 21 Oct 1997, Crom wrote:

> Hello, all... I've got about 5 (not sure -- they're always hidden)
> wild-caught (or so the bag at auction said) Nannacara aunomola.
> They're in a 20H (24"x12" base) planted tank, with several shards of
> pots on the bottom giving them places to hide.  I've had them over 6
> months, and all they do is hide..  The male seems to be the most timid
> of all.  The other denizens of the tank are 6 Harlequin rasboras, and
> a few snails.  The pH in the tank is around 7, and the temp around 78.
> 

They are shy.  Mine seem happiest hiding among plants, so make sure you
have plenty of the low-growing variety (e.g., pygmy chain sword or
lilleaopsis).  Also, I keep mine with cories.  Since they live so low in
the water, some bottom dwelling fish might be better dithers for them.
The water conditions seem ok, as long as the hardness is also low.  Good
luck.

 Tom
 
 Work Phone: (206)-543-1075             Physical Mail: Box 352700
 Fax:        (206)-543-1543                            University of Washington
 Home Page : http://www.ce.washington.edu/~tep         Seattle, WA
                                                       98195


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No-luck Nannacara

by "Darren J. Hanson" <djhanson/calweb.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 1997
To: apisto/majordomo.pobox.com

At 10:24 AM 10/21/97 GMT, Crom wrote:
>Hello, all... I've got about 5 (not sure -- they're always hidden)
>wild-caught (or so the bag at auction said) Nannacara aunomola.
>They're in a 20H (24"x12" base) planted tank, with several shards of
>pots on the bottom giving them places to hide.  I've had them over 6
>months, and all they do is hide..  The male seems to be the most timid
>of all.  The other denizens of the tank are 6 Harlequin rasboras, and
>a few snails.  The pH in the tank is around 7, and the temp around 78.
>
>I've heard that these are ridiculously easy to breed, and am at a loss
>as to why I'm having difficulty with them.  Suggestions?

Hi Brian;

My name is Kaycy and I had spawned the N. anomala in 1995. I kept a pair by
themselves with a thin layer of fine sand on the bottom, a 3" ceramic flower
pot, and a sponge filter. The female would never lay the eggs in the same
place each time she spawned. I had no dithers in the tank. I also had a
large Nubius 'barteri' plant in the tank to protect the male from the
female. He usually stayed in the back, upper left corner of the tank after
they had spawned. It was a regular 20 gallon tank. I also had no light on
the tank. They seemed to like it being a bit dim. My pH was around 7 and my
hardness was 5.0. The temperature was the temp of the room, around 76*F. I
find I have better luck spawning my apistos without dithers and only one
male to one female.

It was quite fun to watch the female to see where she would lay her eggs
next. I guess laying her spawn on the outer top part of the flower pot was
her favorite place.

My suggestion would be to place them (a pair) by themselves, low light, and
just wait.

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No-luck Nannacara

by Stuart <stuart/snoopers.karoo.co.uk>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 1997
To: apisto/majordomo.pobox.com

Hi .... Sorry for the delay, I've got a breeding pair of these fish, with a
tank full of fry and it took me 5mths to get them to spawn, after the
previous batch where born in a community tank.

They are very secretive fish, mine are kept in a 18in long, 15in high, 12in
wide, species tank which is heavily planted and contains plenty of cave's,
made from slate.

The water is pH 6.5, 3 dKH, temp 80f, in both case's the female spawned on
vertical pieces of slate, (I noticed that my Nanacara Aureocephalus did the
same), at which time the female became extremely aggressive, so much so I
had to remove the male, who is 3 times her size, from the tank.

In your position I'd remove 3 of your Anomala and just leave the most
compatible male and female, I'd also remove the snails, (I've never had
much success breeding fish with snails in the tank, they sneak up in the
dark and eat the eggs), when they breed it would be a good idea to remove
the Rasbora as well.

A good indication that they've bred, is the female, she goes a very dark,
almost black colour and has several black lines "checkerboarding" her body,
you'll also find the male cowering in a corner somewhere.

Hope this helps

Stuart

----------
From: Crom <crom-at-cris.com>
To: apisto-at-majordomo.pobox.com
Subject: No-luck Nannacara
Date: 21 October 1997 11:24

Hello, all... I've got about 5 (not sure -- they're always hidden)
wild-caught (or so the bag at auction said) Nannacara aunomola.
They're in a 20H (24"x12" base) planted tank, with several shards of
pots on the bottom giving them places to hide.  I've had them over 6
months, and all they do is hide..  The male seems to be the most timid
of all.  The other denizens of the tank are 6 Harlequin rasboras, and
a few snails.  The pH in the tank is around 7, and the temp around 78.

I've heard that these are ridiculously easy to breed, and am at a loss
as to why I'm having difficulty with them.  Suggestions?

Thanx much,
Brian T Forsythe
crom-at-cris.com
			

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Welcome and a bit about N.anomala

by "Darren J. Hanson" <djhanson/calweb.com>
Date: Mon, 27 Jul 1998
To: apisto/majordomo.pobox.com

Tomasz Nidecki wrote:
> I'm not sure whether N.anomala will
> breed without slate? 

This is a bit late, but I'm going through all my email and it goes back
a few days.

My anomala spawned in a 20 gallon tank with a 10" live barteri plant
(for the male to hide in) and a clay 3" flower pot. She never seemed to
spawn in the same place twice. She would spawn inside the pot, on the
bottom, side and the roof, then on the outside of the pot all over it at
different times. I only had a 1" layer of fine white sand in the tank. I
also used straight RO water and a sponge filter.

Just my experience.

Kaycy


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Two Questions

by "Helen Burns" <helen.burns/bigwig.net>
Date: Sun, 2 May 1999
To: <apisto/admin.listbox.com>

Until quite recently I had a pair of N. Aureocephalus, male recently died
and he was at least 3.25"  (8.25cm), he was a spectacular fish.  I
maintained them in pH6 - 6.5, the pair did spawn several times but alas with
no success.  Although the male was large I personally cannot imagine them
attaining 12cm (4.75"), what a sight that would be as they are a lovely
species.
Helen
Scotland. UK
-----Original Message-----
From: Frauley/Elson <fraulels@minet.ca>
To: apisto@admin.listbox.com <apisto@admin.listbox.com>
Date: 02 May 1999 12:44
Subject: Re: Two Questions


>Steph & Dave wrote:
>> Secondly:
>> I am planning to get a pair of Nannacara aureocephalus.  Other than
>> whats in Linke & Staeck can any one add any pearls of wisdom about these
>> fish?  Spawing experiences etc..
>> I am planning on keeping them in the 4ft 'south american' tank with
>> juveniles angels, borelli, bristlenose and black neons.
>> Steph
>
>Hi Steph,
>While I'm passing along rumours - I've never seen N aureocephalus but I
>was told specimens being kept in Germany have hit a solid 12cm, big for
>a dwarf. If anyone on the list has kept the species I'd love to hear if
>that can be confirmed or not.
>The fish rumourmonger signs off,
>Gary




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Re:Two Questions

by ProfPhilo/aol.com
Date: Tue, 4 May 1999
To: apisto/admin.listbox.com

greetings all,
I am currently keeping and spawning N. aureocephalus. Origininally I was 
keeping them at ~ pH 6 which they did very well. Currently they are in a 
different tank with a pH of around 7 in which they still spawn but I haven't 
had any free-swimmers yet...hmmm. I would say that they are easy to spawn. 
The mother is very 'hyper' about her brood and tends to eat the babies if 
stressed for any reason. She keeps them in a very tight group undergoing some 
kind of rapid shaking motion over the group. I've seen this in other but 
these guys seem the most intense. The fry grow  fast and start out relativly 
large (in my limited experience) but are shy. I have about 4 survivors right 
now. 
I have a trio, 2 females and one male. the male is a magnificent fish with ( 
as previously stated) flowing fins. He is the biggest fish that I own, I'll 
go measure him...
although holding ruler to glass isn't the most quantitative method of 
measuring I'd say he is about 8-9 cm long maybe 10 with fins. The females are 
about half that. 
Actually the Linke and Staeke picture is pretty good in my opinion. Mine are 
not too aggressive, the females harrass each other more than anything else. 
They become darkly checkered when in the spawing mode or protecting eggs/fry. 
The male spawns with both females alternately but one female is definately 
the 'alfa' female as we call her. 
And that is my two cents on Nanacara aureocephalus.
Tarah


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sexing N. aureocephalus

by Mike & Diane Wise <apistowise/bewellnet.com>
Date: Fri, 10 Dec 1999
To: apisto/majordomo.pobox.com

Steph,

Males are easily distinguished from females once they get some size - about 5cm
(2") SL. They should be sexing out soon. Like most dwarfs they can breed before
they take on their adult form. N. aureocephalus is a fish that tends to breed
only in soft, fairly acid water. Make sure you breed them like A. nijsseni and
you should get results. All of the Nannacara species are "secretive" spawners.
They will usually breed on the underside of a piece of driftwood, a shaded corner
of the tank, or even in a pit near plant roots. They do not need a cave for
spawning, like most apistos. Your females seem to be behaving naturally. If your
water conditions are correct you should get fry in the next few month.

Mike Wise

Steph & Dave wrote:

> Hi Folks
>
> I have 5 Nannacara aureocephalus in a 50 gal tank, along with a few
> other dwarfs.
>
> The smallest is about 3.5 cm TL and the biggest two are about 4.5 -5 cm
> TL
>
> I have had a female lay eggs (twice) and guard them but couldnt tell if
> they were fertilised or not due to the hole she layed them in.
>
> None of the fish i have look like the pic of the male in Linke &
> Staeck.  They all look quite similar, and all show at least sometimes
> the dark checkered pattern above the lateral line but I dont know
> whether this is definately a female only feature.
>
> Is there any way I can positively sex them?
> At waht age/size do the males start to colour up?
> Have I really ended up with 5 girls?
>
> Thanks
>
> Steph
>
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Interbreeding

by Mike & Diane Wise <apistowise/bewellnet.com>
Date: Tue, 20 Jun 2000
To: apisto/majordomo.pobox.com



Steph & Dave wrote:

> When I look at Linke and Staeck (pgs 204 & 206) I see quite different
> head shapes.. am I seeing things?

Not really, Steph. What you are looking at is an older male N. aureocephalus and a
younger N. anomala. Basic body and fin shapes are similar in both species, although N.
anomala is a slightly more slender species. It's not a good idea to rely on just a
couple of photos to ID a species.

> When I look at my fish some show a more protruding lower jaw, and some
> do not.  They are all MEANT to be aureocephalus, but I have never kept
> mature fish of either species before so Im a little in the dark as to
> waht they are all meant to look like, and can only work of the pics in
> the books.

True, and the more photos you see, the better the idea of what is important. Actually
the most easily seen diagnostic feature separating the species is the color pattern on
the flank scales:
dark centers with light edges - N. anomala
light centers with dark edges - N. aureocephalus.

> I started to wonder about the obvious male as he occassionally shows
> some green colouring the flanks/body and his anal fin has a dark line
> across the bottom, but I cant see any pattern of dots in it, as
> described by L&S.  This may be because he is not mature enough for this
> yet?

Maybe they are too young. L&S are referring to the spot rows on the soft (back) part of
the anal fin. This is seen on many apistos, too. Remember, colors are not generally
useful as diagnostic features in dwarf cichlid species. Rely on the pattern of dark
markings.

> Are there any other diagnostic features other than scale pattern that
> can be used to distinguish the two species?

Yes, but they are not easily seen on live specimens. N. aureocephalus usually has fine
dots in the soft part of the dorsal fin as well as the hard part. N. anomala has fine
dots only in the hard part of the dorsal, extending slightly into the soft part. But
now we have populations of both species that show gradations that make this feature
less reliable.

> I would never deliberatly mix fish that are so closely related and never
> mix ones that I was not able to distinguish between.  However when
> buying juveniles of a species I havent bred before, I am reliant on the
> other person telling me the right thing, my fish came from two sources,
> one was private and I trust them, the other .. who knows.

I understand your dilemma. Personally, I never keep fish of the same species, bought
from different sources, together unless I'm absolutely positive they are the same
species. It's better to mix them with a different species if necessary. This avoids any
questions of hybridizing.

Without seeing your fish, I'd bet that they are the same species. N. aureocephalus is
rarely found as wild caught species in North America and wild-caught fish are more
commonly misidentified. N. aureocephalus we see here are almost all domestic offspring
of fish brought in from Europe so the name is probably correct.

Mike Wise

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N. Anomala

by Mike & Diane Wise <apistowise/bewellnet.com>
Date: Fri, 10 Mar 2000
To: apisto/majordomo.pobox.com

Francine,

I know that this won't be of much comfort to you, but I and most people have no
problems with breeding N. anomala. I will admit most males are eager to court any
female that comes their way. Your tank and water conditions are fine (unless you
have them in saltwater). I'd suggest that you remove your "over eager" male and
put in another male and an extra female. If this works you may have to remove the
male & extra female once you have a spawn. If you think the males are aggressive,
you haven't seen anything until you see a brooding female!

Hope this helps.

Mike Wise

Fbethea wrote:

> I recently bought several Anomala. I put them in a 20 long, ph 6.0, temp 80
> degrees.  The tank is heavily planted and has 8 white clouds and 8 c.
> habrosus.
> There are slate platforms under the plants, a large concave piece of
> driftwood, and a whole coconut shell cut to create a cave.  I use an
> aquaclear canister filter.  The water flow from the filter is very low.  I
> feed them daphnia, tubifex, frozen and live brine shrimp.
>
> I have had these fish for a month.  They will not spawn.  As a matter of
> fact the male beats the he** out of the others so much that I removed them
> and left one female in the tank.  He seeks her out and chases her around the
> tank.  Are all Anomalas this cantankerous?
>
> Francine in MD
> Fish - photography - genealogy
>
> _______________________________________________________
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Nannacara Anomala

by Mike & Diane Wise <apistowise/bewellnet.com>
Date: Sat, 26 Aug 2000
To: apisto/listbox.com

Steve,

Nannacara anomala females are exceptional parents
and take excellent care of their fry. I have even
seen them chew up flakes and larger frozen food
and spit it into their swarm of fry for food. They
defend their fry from fish many times their own
size. As for males, I once had a male take over
care of fry when the female unexpectedly died. It
was strange to see him take on the lattice like
pattern of a brooding female. I would only remove
the male if you see him being harassed by the
female. If there are hiding places for him, and
dither fish to keep him busy, he should be OK.

Mike Wise

Kim Rogers or Steve Hatfield wrote:

> HelloIts been quiet out there! So here we go, I
> have a small pair of nannacara anomala with a
> nice batch of very small freeswimming fry In a
> 15 gal tank. Should I pull the male? they seem
> to be getting along ok. Should I pull both
> parents to make sure the fry don`t become
> lunch?? Thanks Steve


Nannacara Anomala

by BigJohnW/webtv.net (John Wubbolt)
Date: Sat, 26 Aug 2000
To: apisto/listbox.com

Hello all
Its funny that this thread comes along just as the gorgeous little pair
of N anomala i picked up at the ACA had spawned for me 3 days ago.   My
female, barely and inch SL has taken on that nice little checker board
pattern and has promptly decided that the male wasn't allowed anywhere
near the group of wigglers she has.   So for the safety of the male, i
removed him from the tank.   From previous experience with this species,
i have had way too many times where the female 1/2 to 1/3 the size of
the male, had beaten and killed the male in the tank.   Not this time,
this male has been safely removed.   I have never had a pair that raised
the fry together.  And this is out of experience with at least 10
different pairs.   So My suggestion, which differs from Mikes, is to
remove that Male so long as he's still alive,  Mom will do an excellent
job raising those fry without pappa around.    I presently have around
40+ wiggler/ fry in this clutch.  Not too shabby for a first spawn from
this pair.!!!!   Good luck with your fry and pair.   This is one species
i never get tired of keeping around.

John




'Big yellow band' Apisto?

by Mike & Diane Wise <apistowise/bewellnet.com>
Date: Tue, 10 Apr 2001
To: apisto/listbox.com

Arthit,

Nannacara anomala, commonly called the Golden Eye Dwarf Cichlid, frequently
comes in labeled as Apistogramma. They are actually more closely related to
dwarf acaras (Laetacara) and the true Cichlasoma species from South America.
You will notice that they have larger scales than apistos. They behave similar
to apistos and are wonderful fish that are easy to keep and breed. It is not a
rare species. Your cost is about normal for the more common domestically raised
dwarf cichlids.  In the US wild caught Nannacara (and apistos) sell for half
this price.

Mike Wise

Arthit Prasartkul wrote:

> Dear Mike,
> People at my LFS that imports variety of fish are just making a mess, I
> think. Thier emplyees don't know anything about fish, they only know how to
> bag them to the customers!
>
> I got a trio of Apistos which, at first, I did not know what they were
> until I came back and check it out at The Kribs. On the tank, it was just
> said "Apistogramma" and that's it! I just really want apistos so I bought
> them, just cannot wait til the end of the month when my friend will be back
> from Singapore.
>
> Someone here said that "Big Yellow Band" might be Nannacara anomala. I look
> at the kribs and they are quite familiar the ones I saw. I thin that 'Big
> yellow band' probably refers to their yellow bellies! Would that be
> possible? They are sold for 500 baht each (about 11 us$) Is this a rare
> species? Should I go for it?
>
> Arthit
>
> >Arthit,
>
> I have over 300 names given apistos, but 'Big Yellow Band Apisto' is a new
> name
> to me.
>
> Mike Wise
>
> Search http://www.digital.com for "Apistogramma Mailing List Archives"!




Search http://www.digital.com for "Apistogramma Mailing List Archives"!


N. anomala question

by Mike & Diane Wise <apistowise/bewellnet.com>
Date: Fri, 03 Nov 2000
To: apisto/listbox.com

If given the opportunity N. anomala will be a harem breeder. Just make certain
that each female has a square foot (900 sq cm) of surface territory and that the
male can escape all of the females' territories or mayhem is sure to occur. A 10
gallon tank will easily house a breeding pair, but you will need at least a
20L/29 to house a trio safely.

Mike Wise

Tyrone Genade wrote:

> Hi all
>
> >From what I've read, most Apistogrammas display harem forming
> breeding behaviour. Does this behaviour also occur in anomala or
> is it normal pr bonding as seen in Kribs?
>
> Thanks
>
> Tyrone Genade
> http://www.geocities.com/tyronegenade/intro.html
>
> Department Biochemistry        Molecular Cell Physiology Lab
> University of Stellenbosch              Ph: +27-021-808-5880
> Republic of South Africa               fax: +27-021-808-5863
> *************************************************************
> "Everything works for good for those who love The Lord"
>                            Romans 8:28
>




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This page was last updated 17 February 2002