You are at The Krib ->Apistogramma/Dwarf Cichlids [E-mail]

Pelvicachromis taeniatus

Long sought by hobbyists, this west African cichlid has over a dozen different regional forms.

Here are a trio of articles written for the Greater Seattle Aquarium Society as part of it's "All Pelvicachromis Issue":

Contents:

  1. taeniatus " Redface"
    by rytireefs/juno.com (Phillip J Ryti) (Tue, 10 Feb 1998)
  2. P. taeniatus "Wouri" and taeniatus "Nigerian Redface"
    by rytireefs/juno.com (Phillip J Ryti) (Mon, 9 Feb 1998)
  3. Pelv. taeniatus bandewouri vs. wouri
    by Steven White <sawhite/bicnet.net> (Tue, 17 Feb 1998)
  4. P.taeniata "moliwe"
    by Mike & Diane Wise <apistowise/bewellnet.com> (Wed, 16 Sep 1998)
  5. Pelvicachromis taeniatus tips
    by Frauley/Elson <fraulels/minet.ca> (Mon, 12 Oct 1998)
  6. Pelv taeniatus
    by Mike Downey <windwalker/uky.campuscw.net> (Sat, 5 Dec 1998)
  7. Pelv taeniatus
    by Michael Meyer <mikeymeyer/sprintmail.com> (Thu, 03 Dec 1998)
  8. New P.taeniatus
    by Steven White <sawhite/bicnet.net> (Fri, 29 Jan 1999)
  9. P. Taeniatus Moliwe qustion
    by "Kevin Jones" <spikes37/hotmail.com> (Sun, 27 Dec 1998)
  10. P. Taeniatus male that won't eat
    by Frauley/Elson <fraulels/minet.ca> (Tue, 29 Dec 1998)
  11. P. Taeniatus male that won't eat
    by Apflanzeneh/webtv.net (Tue, 29 Dec 1998)
  12. Cacatuoides Fry Mortality
    by "Uneekwa" <francinebethea/excite.com> (Tue, 25 May 1999)
  13. P. taeniatus or subocellatus Matadi?
    by Mike & Diane Wise <apistowise/bewellnet.com> (Mon, 01 Mar 1999)
  14. Pv. taeniatus Matadi or Pv. subocellatus Matadi black?
    by Mike & Diane Wise <apistowise/bewellnet.com> (Fri, 26 Feb 1999)
  15. Dumb Luck
    by Frauley/Elson <fraulels/minet.ca> (Wed, 27 Oct 1999)
  16. Dumb Luck
    by Mike & Diane Wise <apistowise/bewellnet.com> (Thu, 28 Oct 1999)
  17. Dumb Luck
    by Frauley/Elson <fraulels/minet.ca> (Sat, 30 Oct 1999)
  18. Pelvicachromis taeniatus
    by coenga/infonie.fr (Dujardin Colin) (Wed, 19 Apr 2000)
  19. Ailing krib and Krib genetics
    by Mike & Diane Wise <apistowise/bewellnet.com> (Tue, 28 Mar 2000)


P. taeniatus "Kienke" pair


P. taeniatus "Bandawouri" male




P. taeniatus "Moliwe" male (top) and female (bottom)


P. taeniatus "Nigerian Green" male


P. taeniatus "Nigerian Green" male


P. taeniatus "Nigerian Green" female

Photo and sketches by Erik Olson


P. taeniatus "Nange" female

Photo by Ken Laidlaw

taeniatus " Redface"

by rytireefs/juno.com (Phillip J Ryti)
Date: Tue, 10 Feb 1998
To: apisto/majordomo.pobox.com

Julio Melgar wrote:
Any difference between the "RedFace" and the regular "Nigeria Red"?

To my knowledge, in speaking with Bob Stevens, the fish are different.
His fish have more red than a normal "Nigerian Red" taeniatus. I spoke
with 
him about this fish once but I don't remember all the particulars in
regards to
what it exactly looks like. 

His phone number is on his web page if you are interested.
http://www.commonwealth.net/bob/
If I see him in the next couple of weeks I will post any info I can on
the fish
since he leaves nearby.

Phillip Ryti


-------------------------------------------------------------------------
This is the apistogramma mailing list, apisto-at-majordomo.pobox.com.
For instructions on how to subscribe or unsubscribe or get help,
email apisto-request-at-majordomo.pobox.com.
Search http://altavista.digital.com for "Apistogramma Mailing List Archives"!



P. taeniatus "Wouri" and taeniatus "Nigerian Redface"

by rytireefs/juno.com (Phillip J Ryti)
Date: Mon, 9 Feb 1998
To: apisto/majordomo.pobox.com


Andy wrote:
I just received 5 of each of these fish (all F1's)and placed them in 
tanks excited to breed them. The Wori (3 females and 2 males) are in a 55

planted tank with a pair of N. Trans. and a pair of subocellatus. Ph is
6.9 
soft water, Congo tetras and 2 pair of small killies (a. garderi) are
also 
in the tank.  Anyone have any suggestions or tips? The "Wouri" need to
grow out 
a bit they are about 1".  The "Nigerian Redface" look like sub-o's and
they 
may just be that.  The breeder I got them from claims that the person who

caught his wild pair said that these fish are not in any books.  Anybody
know 
anything about them?

These fish more than likely came from Robert Stevens in Livonia, MI.
His web site can be found at:
http://www.commonwealth.net/bob/

In a recent article in All Cichlids, a publication of Michigan Cichlid
Association,
Robert Stevens wrote a fine article on Pelvicachromis taeniatus "Wouri".
He gets many of his fish directly from Africa. A German friend of his
catches 
and ships him what he wants. The price is high for some pairs including
shipping 
but they are guaranteed wild.

He wrote in part the conditions of the spawn with "Wouri".
Temperature was 76 degrees Fahrenheit, undergravel filter,
pH under seven with the addition of pH down. Fifty percent 
water change every 3 weeks. Flake foods were eaten. Also supplemented
with frozen brine shrimp.

In speaking with Bob regarding the "RedFace" taeniatus, they are not
pictured
in the books they were "Discovered" by his importer who chose to call
them 
simply "RedFace". 

Again check out his site. His phone number is there if you desire to
call.

Phillip Ryti, MI
rytireefs-at-juno.com


-------------------------------------------------------------------------
This is the apistogramma mailing list, apisto-at-majordomo.pobox.com.
For instructions on how to subscribe or unsubscribe or get help,
email apisto-request-at-majordomo.pobox.com.
Search http://altavista.digital.com for "Apistogramma Mailing List Archives"!



Pelv. taeniatus bandewouri vs. wouri

by Steven White <sawhite/bicnet.net>
Date: Tue, 17 Feb 1998
To: apisto/majordomo.pobox.com

Steven J. Waldron wrote:
> 
> Hi all,
> Recently came across some P."bandewouri" at LFS here in S.F. Curious to
> know if this fish is similiar to wouri in more than a collecting locale
> suffix. The store's "bandewouri" look very typical for a taeniatus, not
> unlike other morphs (e.g. Nigerian)- the wouri from Linke and Staeck seems
> like a very distinct animal. Does anyone have any experience with these to
> offer?
> Thanks,
> Steve
> 
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
> This is the apistogramma mailing list, apisto-at-majordomo.pobox.com.
> For instructions on how to subscribe or unsubscribe or get help,
> email apisto-request-at-majordomo.pobox.com.
> Search http://altavista.digital.com for "Apistogramma Mailing List Archives"!

Steve,

Sorry for the following "lecture" but I really get enthusiastic about
these fish!

Bandewouri is a locality from the southern part of taeniatus' range. The
forms from Kienke, Nyong, Loukundje, and Dehane (even the Lobe and Grand
Batanga) are all similar forms. The southern forms are considered the
"true" kribensis.
Wouri is a fish from further north closer to where the Moliwe, Muyuka
and Funge forms are found. It is a fish that is very different in
appearance from the southern forms (at least as different as they can
be).  The fish that I've had and spawned (not so successfully) were
truly spectacular.  The males have the dark upper edging to the caudal
and no dark ocelli as do most of the others (except lobe and grand
batanga) just like the photo!!

The Nigerian forms are another population group. Recently, a form from
the Cross River region has appeared and this is getting close to the
eastern limits of the Nigerian forms.  Who knows what occurs between
there and the region in which Moliwe, etc. are found?  

One thing though, are the wouri that have been mentioned recently, that
I've just ordered really bandewouri??  ---- They ain't the same
fish!! 								
												Steve


-------------------------------------------------------------------------
This is the apistogramma mailing list, apisto-at-majordomo.pobox.com.
For instructions on how to subscribe or unsubscribe or get help,
email apisto-request-at-majordomo.pobox.com.
Search http://altavista.digital.com for "Apistogramma Mailing List Archives"!



P.taeniata "moliwe"

by Mike & Diane Wise <apistowise/bewellnet.com>
Date: Wed, 16 Sep 1998
To: apisto/majordomo.pobox.com



Mayalauren-at-aol.com wrote:

> Today I snapped up a female moliwe. At least that was what I was told. She
> does'nt look like any fish in the L & S book, something between the Nigeria
> yellow and the Moliwe. She only has one spot on her dorsal. Are dorsal spots a
> species diferentiating trait?

No. Spots on Pelvicachromis can be variable. When I had Moliwe, nearly 20 years
ago, some of the females had 1, others had 2 dorsal spots. Out of my last spawn of
Pv. roloffi (Guinea) I have females with anywhere from 0 to 2 dorsal spots.

> Can different species of taeniatus interbreed?

Pv. taeniatus, as it now stands, is a single species with many color forms. I
assume you mean will the various color forms interbreed. Of course they will just
like different color forms of aggies will.

While on the subject of Pv. taeniatus it should be mentioned that what we consider
a single species (Pv. taeniatus) actually appears to be a species-complex - a
group of very closely related species with a single related ancestor (monophyly).
There appear to be at least two, but probably more, species within the complex. In
the Nigerian forms, for example, the males have indistinct lateral bands and dark
margins on the lower lobe of the caudal fin. Their female counterparts show
distinct lateral bands and often strongly patterned tails. These are like the
holotype of Pv. taeniatus. In the Cameroon forms the males have very pale or no
lateral band and the lower lobe does not have the dark rim of the Nigerian forms.
Spots on the upper lobe of the tail are fewer but larger in the Cameroon form,
too. Their females show no or very indistinct lateral bands and unpatterned tails,
except for a few large spots. The Cameroon forms are more like the holotype of A.
kribensis. Then there are some intermediate forms that have mixes of the Pv.
taeniatus and Pv. kribensis features. Moliwe (more Nigeria-like) & Muyuka (more
Cameroon-like) are examples. It's these intermediate forms that have bound the
forms of Pv. taeniatus into a single species for now. This is really out of my
area of research, but I'm looking forward to seeing what happens in the future.

>  I really want to get the right male for her but I want to be sure of what she
> is!
> If anyone has some specific points by which to tell the different species I'd
> be most grateful.
> Jason (I wish I could post a picture... but I can't!!)

Moliwe females are  deeper bodied (like a female Pv. pulcher) than the more
slender Nigeria forms.

Mike Wise

>
>
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
> This is the apistogramma mailing list, apisto-at-majordomo.pobox.com.
> For instructions on how to subscribe or unsubscribe or get help,
> email apisto-request-at-majordomo.pobox.com.
> Search http://altavista.digital.com for "Apistogramma Mailing List Archives"!




-------------------------------------------------------------------------
This is the apistogramma mailing list, apisto-at-majordomo.pobox.com.
For instructions on how to subscribe or unsubscribe or get help,
email apisto-request-at-majordomo.pobox.com.
Search http://altavista.digital.com for "Apistogramma Mailing List Archives"!


Pelvicachromis taeniatus tips

by Frauley/Elson <fraulels/minet.ca>
Date: Mon, 12 Oct 1998
To: apisto/majordomo.pobox.com

Dujardin Colin wrote:
> 
> Hi to the apistogramma mailing list.
> 
>         I'm a newcomer here, living in France.
>         I recently had the chance to buy a couple of Pelvicachromis
> taeniatus Moliwe, captivity bred (eastern europe I think) of 3,5 cm for
> the male and 3 cm for the female ( which incidentally has blue eyes, a
> red belly but no horizontal black ray on the side as kym's P. Pulcher
> female). As in Linke's book but with red belly.
>       
>        
>         Are they really tougher to make spawn than usual kribs ?
>         Is the pH related sex ratio of 50% correctly goaled with a 6,2
> pH ?

> 
> Thanks in anticipation,
> Moliwely your,
> Colin Dujardin : coenga@infonie.fr
Salut Colin,

Taeniatus Moliwe is harder than most aquarium strain pulcher to spawn,
but in my experience, easier than wild pulcher. I played a lot with
temperature and pH for even sex ratios. At pH 6.8 and 28 degrees I did
fairly well (60/40 in favour of males). Other pH ranges (to 7.4) seemed
to have no effect, but temp probably did. I ranged from 75 to 60 percent
males with mine. I didn't adjust softness, as my tapwater is at 140 ppm.
Bonne chance,
Gary


-------------------------------------------------------------------------
This is the apistogramma mailing list, apisto@majordomo.pobox.com.
For instructions on how to subscribe or unsubscribe or get help,
email apisto-request@majordomo.pobox.com.
Search http://altavista.digital.com for "Apistogramma Mailing List Archives"!


Pelv taeniatus

by Mike Downey <windwalker/uky.campuscw.net>
Date: Sat, 5 Dec 1998
To: apisto/majordomo.pobox.com

>>I've had my second pair of P. taeniatus "Wouri" spawn.  My first ate
>>their fry.  It seems that the wrigglers of these fish are smaller than
>>that of P. pulcher that I have spawned in the past.


Mike,

All the taeniatus fry seem to be smaller and they grow much slower than the
P. pulcher fry in my observations.  The largest male taeniatus that I have
observed is only 11 cm (tl) and I have seen some huge male pulcher. One
wild specimen was 15 cm TL.

I find most pulcher don't mind human observations while they fry are young.
My taeniatus will often eat fry at the intruding face of a child or overly
anxious adult peering into the tank while the fry are newly out of the cave.

As a note: I have recently obtained some taeniatus "Moliwe" to mix with the
strain I have that are loaded with caudil and dorsal dots. Some females
have 4 in the dorsal and the caudil.  Most wild ones that I have seen have
1 or 2 at the most on the females. I beleive these to be F1 .  Are there
others out there that would comment on their "Moliwe" dot quantities?

MikeD



-------------------------------------------------------------------------
This is the apistogramma mailing list, apisto@majordomo.pobox.com.
For instructions on how to subscribe or unsubscribe or get help,
email apisto-request@majordomo.pobox.com.
Search http://altavista.digital.com for "Apistogramma Mailing List Archives"!


Pelv taeniatus

by Michael Meyer <mikeymeyer/sprintmail.com>
Date: Thu, 03 Dec 1998
To: apisto/majordomo.pobox.com

Myongsu Kong wrote:
> 
> Congratulations on your success.  I am very envious.  I
> have been trying to spawn "Wouri" for the last five months with
> minimal success.  Would you mind sharing information on your
> spawn?  In particular, I am curious as to water parameters
> (i.e., pH, dKH, dH, temperature), tank size/filtration/substrate,
> food, presence of dither fish or plants, water change schedule,
> whether the fish were F0s, F1s or later, the barometric pressure
> at the time of spawning, whether a high/low pressure front was
> passing through, the number of horse shoes and rabbit's feet
> kept near the tank (if any), the phase of the moon, the alignment
> of the planets, etc.   You know, all the good stuff!
> 
> Seriously, though, I would appreciate whatever information you
> have to share including a description of the courtship, if possible.
> 

I'll give you what I can.  The temp was 78' F.  The pH was 6.0.  I have
very hard water around here (KC - lots of limestone here), but I diluted
it with 2 parts rainwater to 1 part very hard tap water.  The fish are
in a 15 gallon tank with a ATI sponge filter for filtration.  Java Fern
and water sprite are moderately placed throughout the tank.  But the
thing that triggered the spawning was a small 3" flower pot that I place
inverted in the tank.  I enlarged the drain hole so that the female
could barely squeeze into the pot.  The next day she decorated the top
of her "cave" with some of the silica substrate.  

The second spawning occurred in the 15 next to the first spawn.  The
parents of both spawnings were constantly showing and flashing at the
rival pair.  After the success of the first spawn I placed a flower pot
in the second tank.  This tank had a natural small gravel for
substrate.  A female copied the first female's decorated habits and
placed gravel around the entrance of her cave.  This tank housed 2 pair
of Pelv. taeniatus "Wouri".  After the spawning I checked the pH.  This
tank was at 4.35!  Temp at 78' also. I feel the secret is the inverted
flower pot.  I was going to get a conductivity meter, but have been
willing to part with the money.  I could have bought one in our auction
last year for under $30!! Damn, I was stupid.  I know better now.

As far as I know the weather has been pretty stable and I don't know of
any low pressure situations that might preceed a rainstorm.  Tonite
however, it is supposed to rain.  Come on cories!!

The tanks have lights on timers and I haven't changed the photoperiod.

Incidently, I had some A. caucatodies spawn inside a piece of driftwood
in a hole that I did not know existed till I saw the female peaking her
head out of the hole.  It was smaller than a dime on the 3 foot piece of
wood.  It reminded me of the way the flowerpots were used.  Has anyone
else used flowerpots this way (inverted)?  Hope this all helps!

Michael


-------------------------------------------------------------------------
This is the apistogramma mailing list, apisto@majordomo.pobox.com.
For instructions on how to subscribe or unsubscribe or get help,
email apisto-request@majordomo.pobox.com.
Search http://altavista.digital.com for "Apistogramma Mailing List Archives"!


New P.taeniatus

by Steven White <sawhite/bicnet.net>
Date: Fri, 29 Jan 1999
To: apisto/majordomo.pobox.com

Mayalauren@aol.com wrote:
> 
> I'm going to be getting four varieties of wild taeniatus this weekend-
> Lokoundje, Wouri,Kienke, and one I'm not familiar with- Nyete.
> If anyone has any info on this one could you let me know.
> I have been told that taeniatus are best kept in groups of five...again what
> are peoples experiences.
> Many thanks
> Jason
> 

Jason,

Nyete is a locality in the south of Cameroon, near the border of
Equitorial Guinea. From that region of Cameroon,  the taeniatus from
Lobe and Nyete (and Grand Batanga - does anyone still have this form?)
are variations of the same "theme". The males lack black spotting on the
caudal, as do the females on both the dorsal and caudal. Nyete is a very
nice fish and not very problematical to keep, breed and raise. 

												Steve White
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
> This is the apistogramma mailing list, apisto@majordomo.pobox.com.
> For instructions on how to subscribe or unsubscribe or get help,
> email apisto-request@majordomo.pobox.com.
> Search http://altavista.digital.com for "Apistogramma Mailing List Archives"!


-------------------------------------------------------------------------
This is the apistogramma mailing list, apisto@majordomo.pobox.com.
For instructions on how to subscribe or unsubscribe or get help,
email apisto-request@majordomo.pobox.com.
Search http://altavista.digital.com for "Apistogramma Mailing List Archives"!


P. Taeniatus Moliwe qustion

by "Kevin Jones" <spikes37/hotmail.com>
Date: Sun, 27 Dec 1998
To: apisto/majordomo.pobox.com


>> Hello, I'm a long time lurker, first time poster here. Some of you 
may recognize
>
>> me from the aquatic plants list, yep, that's the same me. I've kept 
various apistos
>> for the
>
>last 5 years or so. Currently, I have a trio of P. Taeniatus Moliwes in 
a 75 g planted
>aquarium,
>and that leads to my question. The 2 females are voracious eaters with 
round, plump
>bellies.
>They cavort about the tank fearlessly, and attack most anything that is 
fed to them.
>The male is
>very shy, hiding most of the time. He approaches food (frozen brine 
shrimp, fz. blood
>worms, something
>fz. called "lifeline) like he could care less. I've seen him take 
frozen blood worms,
>only to spit them
>right back out. Bottom line is this, I'm afraid I'm going to lose him 
if I don't do
>something.
>What's wrong? What can I do?
>
>tank info:
>ph 7.0
>kh  8
>temp 79
>
>TIA, Pat Bowerman

I currently have a Moliwe pair and their 14 day old offspring in a 30 g 
with otos and a few guppies for dithers.  My first male (the currnet 
male's father) started behaving like this after he spawned for the first 
time with the female.  I noticed the female beating up on him and 
everything else, so maybe that's your problem.  my male eventually died 
even after having the female moved when the babies grew up.  I have 
really soft water (good old Vancouver tap water) ph 7.0 lots of tannins 
in the water from bogwood and peat in the filter my temp is 76-77.
Hope this helps 

Kevin 
 


______________________________________________________
Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com


-------------------------------------------------------------------------
This is the apistogramma mailing list, apisto@majordomo.pobox.com.
For instructions on how to subscribe or unsubscribe or get help,
email apisto-request@majordomo.pobox.com.
Search http://altavista.digital.com for "Apistogramma Mailing List Archives"!


P. Taeniatus male that won't eat

by Frauley/Elson <fraulels/minet.ca>
Date: Tue, 29 Dec 1998
To: apisto/majordomo.pobox.com

Pat Bowerman wrote:
> 
> > Pat,
> > Some questions:
> > how big is he relative to the females?
> 
> He is nearly twice their size. I believe that he is a fully adult male.
> 
> > What other fish are in the tank? (an important question)
> 
> The other fish in the 75 gallon are 6 juvenile Angels, 1 agassizzi female,
> 3 SAE's, 2 Otos,2 pencilfish, and of course, the 2 females.
> 
> > are his feces stringy and white?
> 
> I'm not sure, but I lost the Aggie male with stringy white feces. This was
> after keeping him for several spawns. The aggie male died maybe 6 months
> before the  P. Taeniatus were added to the tank.
> 
> > I kept Moliwes for several generations, and have seen a lot of males
> > waste away (rarely females), and those questions generally point to why.
> > - -Gary
> >
> Gary, thanks, and please share your thoughts. Feel free to e-mail me
> privately if you don't feel that this is interesting enough for the whole
> list.
> 
Hi,
I asked those questions as I find taeniatus males to be very strange
characters. Pelvicachromis in general seem to have a potential for males
with no sexual energy. My last pair had a female who just about stood on
her head crackling with colour to get attention, and a male who ambled
about like he was waiting for the millenium so he could see if his
computer would break. 
Other pelvicas have shown the same frustrating pattern. I figure these
fish are easy to breed, if you get a male who isn't a nerd.
This has other repercussions. Taenie-nerds get pushed around by
everything. Some males will dominate a tank, most seem to take the
passive-aggressive "you gonna bug me? Well I'll just die of a bacterial
infection and you'll feel pretty bad" approach to life's hassles.
I've saved frazzled taenie-nerd males by giving them their own tanks,
fattening them up, then introducing ONE female. On occasion, they've
spawned, but most of them lived healthy lives, succumbing to old age as
vaguely confused virgins.
At this stage, I would never keep taeniatus in with any other cichlid
unless they were a proven pair.
If you see white feces, there's already a bacterial infection or
parasite at work.
Good luck.
Gary
> 
>


-------------------------------------------------------------------------
This is the apistogramma mailing list, apisto@majordomo.pobox.com.
For instructions on how to subscribe or unsubscribe or get help,
email apisto-request@majordomo.pobox.com.
Search http://altavista.digital.com for "Apistogramma Mailing List Archives"!


P. Taeniatus male that won't eat

by Apflanzeneh/webtv.net
Date: Tue, 29 Dec 1998
To: apisto/majordomo.pobox.com

Hi pat,
I've been through much the same thing with Taeniatus in a planted
tank,mine got to the point of the stringy white feces. I dosed the tank
with Metronidazole,with no ill effect to the plants.

As a side note to Canadian readers I've been told that Metronidazole
will no longer be available from your L.f.s in Canada,if you use this
stuff,it might be wise to pick some up before it becomes readily
unavailable!

Steve
Van.B.C


-------------------------------------------------------------------------
This is the apistogramma mailing list, apisto@majordomo.pobox.com.
For instructions on how to subscribe or unsubscribe or get help,
email apisto-request@majordomo.pobox.com.
Search http://altavista.digital.com for "Apistogramma Mailing List Archives"!


Cacatuoides Fry Mortality

by "Uneekwa" <francinebethea/excite.com>
Date: Tue, 25 May 1999
To: apisto/admin.listbox.com

On Tue, 25 May 1999 20:34:04 -0400, hammer@idirect.ca wrote:
I was once told by a someone who knows his stuff, that if your pairs are
spawning that frequently, the male may be eating the fry to force the female
to spawn.  He suggested I remove the male.
With my pelvcachromis taeniatus "dehane" I switched on the light suddenly
and siphoned the whole group of fry and their water into a bare 2.5 gal.  I
haven't lost any.  There are about 30 of them.
> 
> I am hoping someone can point me in the direction that I must be 
> missing. I have a pair of cacatuoides that are spawning every 14 to 
> 21 days with anywhere from 40-75 fry. Unfortunately within the first 
> 7-14 days only about 10-15 fry survive. I have been breeding many 
> types of fish, other than apistos, with only a max. of a few deaths.
> 
> The feedings are light and frequent and consist of microworms for 
> the first couple of days followed with brine shrimp. The tank is 
> clean with no rotting food.
> The water parameters are: pH of 7.0, GH of 140ppm, temp. 78F, 
> nitrates, ammonia and nitrites are undectable.
> 
> This is extremely frustrating since I have never had this problem 
> before.
> 
> Thanks in advance for the input. 
> 
> Graham
> Toronto 
> 
> 
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
> This is the apistogramma mailing list, apisto@listbox.com.
> For instructions on how to subscribe or unsubscribe or get help,
> email apisto-request@listbox.com.
> Search http://altavista.digital.com for "Apistogramma Mailing List
Archives"!

Francine in MD
Fish - photography - genealogy




_______________________________________________________
Get your free, private email at http://mail.excite.com/


-------------------------------------------------------------------------
This is the apistogramma mailing list, apisto@listbox.com.
For instructions on how to subscribe or unsubscribe or get help,
email apisto-request@listbox.com.
Search http://altavista.digital.com for "Apistogramma Mailing List Archives"!


P. taeniatus or subocellatus Matadi?

by Mike & Diane Wise <apistowise/bewellnet.com>
Date: Mon, 01 Mar 1999
To: apisto/admin.listbox.com


Ken Laidlaw wrote:

> >
> > as someone pointed out, the "taeniatus" complex is probably not a single
> > species.
>
> I would have though all the appropriate tests would already
> have been done that proved that all the colour morphs were
> the same species.  What happens if they are crossed
> etc, scale counts etc.  What are the two Bolivian Ram
> species, I'm confused?

Ken,

Since I'm the one who made the statement here to Fredrik's question of Pv.
taeniatus color forms, I guess I should answer this.

Most of the following information came to me from Dr. Paul Loiselle. Paul played
a prominent role in describing many of the new genera and species that were once
members of the polyglot genus Pelmatochromis. Paul will tell you that the
taxonomy of the West African pelmatochromines is still unclear because of the
lack of specimens & adequate sampling of West African rivers.

You are correct in a taxonomic respect. In 1968, while splitting up the genus
Pelmatochromis into several genera, Thys examined Pelmatochromis callipterus,
kribensis, and taeniatus. He determined that these species had overlapping
meristic characters and should be considered one species -  Pelvicachromis
taeniatus (Boulenger, 1901), the oldest name in the group.

In a taxonomic sense, he is correct. Paul says that if you put any of these fish
in alcohol, they will lose their colors and all look the same. But a problem has
arisen. Studies of some Camaroonian rivers show that there is at least one
instance where two color forms of so-called Pv. taeniatus are found living
sympatrically together, but don't interbreed with each other. Since the
biologist's definition of a species is a group of populations that will
interbreed, we obviously have two very closely related biological species here. I
imagine, if more detailed biotope studies were carried out, we would find similar
occurrences elsewhere. How many different non-interbreeding populations are out
there is anyone's guess, but it is a valid reason for never crossing color forms.
And most likely they will cross in the aquarium if they aren't given a choice.

Those who were at Paul's talk, at last year's ACA convention, might remember how
he differentiated the species by color. I could do this right now, but I feel
it's better to leave things as they are. There's no sense in renaming the color
forms now, when in a few years it might be erected to species rank and given a
new name. Just more taxonomic confusion!

Mike Wise

> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
> This is the apistogramma mailing list, apisto@majordomo.pobox.com.
> For instructions on how to subscribe or unsubscribe or get help,
> email apisto-request@majordomo.pobox.com.
> Search http://altavista.digital.com for "Apistogramma Mailing List Archives"!




-------------------------------------------------------------------------
This is the apistogramma mailing list, apisto@majordomo.pobox.com.
For instructions on how to subscribe or unsubscribe or get help,
email apisto-request@majordomo.pobox.com.
Search http://altavista.digital.com for "Apistogramma Mailing List Archives"!


Pv. taeniatus Matadi or Pv. subocellatus Matadi black?

by Mike & Diane Wise <apistowise/bewellnet.com>
Date: Fri, 26 Feb 1999
To: apisto/admin.listbox.com

Colin,

You may not know how big of a problem this is. After talking with Dr. Paul
Loiselle, I now understand that we are not talking about one species (Pv.
taeniatus), but at least three very closely related ones, and possibly more!
Crossing color forms not only mixes the color strains, but can cause hybridizing.
A similar example of this, I understand, occurred with BB Zebras in Lake Malawi.
Once other color forms & closely related species were added to its habitat, it
crossed with them and is now lost as a pure form. All we have are 25 year old
photos.

Mike Wise

Dujardin Colin wrote:

> The BIG problem, I think, is to determinate the REAL color form of these
> fishes, and I'm skeptical about all these new color form names which are
> erupting on a regular basis. It makes us dream about new fishes, but
> dream is not very scientific, nor is "wild" fish trading.
>
> Colin
>
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
> This is the apistogramma mailing list, apisto@majordomo.pobox.com.
> For instructions on how to subscribe or unsubscribe or get help,
> email apisto-request@majordomo.pobox.com.
> Search http://altavista.digital.com for "Apistogramma Mailing List Archives"!




-------------------------------------------------------------------------
This is the apistogramma mailing list, apisto@majordomo.pobox.com.
For instructions on how to subscribe or unsubscribe or get help,
email apisto-request@majordomo.pobox.com.
Search http://altavista.digital.com for "Apistogramma Mailing List Archives"!


Dumb Luck

by Frauley/Elson <fraulels/minet.ca>
Date: Wed, 27 Oct 1999
To: apisto/admin.listbox.com

Paul Evans wrote:
> 
> John,
> 
> interesting.  From what I have read P. taeniatus the
> high pH swings the bias toward female but 6.2 being
> the equilibrium but I could be wrong.  Anyway, what I
> should have asked is with my high pH the sex ratio
> will be biased one way or the other.  Is it too late
> to influence this by adjusting (slowly) the pH?  Or is
> there a window after the hatch like apistos where the
> sex ratio can be influenced by environmental
> parameters?
> 
> Paul
> 
I kept taeniatus Moliwe for a few generations. I suspect temperature is
a key with the fish, more than pH. I got close to 50/50 at 26C, pH 6.8.
I'd suspect things to be very similar to the apisto studies. I don't
have my notes at hand (they're in a crashed 286 computer in the
basement) but it seems to me that at lower temps, I got up to 70% males.
Moliwe is a weird taeniatus though. It's fairly forgiving compared to
some other populations.
Gary




Dumb Luck

by Mike & Diane Wise <apistowise/bewellnet.com>
Date: Thu, 28 Oct 1999
To: apisto/admin.listbox.com

Gary,

Maybe it's because Loiselle believes it is not Pv. taeniatus, but Pv. callipterus
- and he has some good arguments for this idea.

Mike Wise

Frauley/Elson wrote:

> Moliwe is a weird taeniatus though. It's fairly forgiving compared to
> some other populations.
> Gary
>
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
> This is the apistogramma mailing list, apisto@listbox.com.
> For instructions on how to subscribe or unsubscribe or get help,
> email apisto-request@listbox.com.
> Search http://altavista.digital.com for "Apistogramma Mailing List Archives"!




Dumb Luck

by Frauley/Elson <fraulels/minet.ca>
Date: Sat, 30 Oct 1999
To: apisto/admin.listbox.com

When I've raised the question of Moliwe vs other taeniatus populations
with other West African cichlid keepers, it's been really easy to reach
a consensus. The observation that they're quite different has been made
by most everyone who has kept several populations.
I guess that shows there's value to hobbyist observations, eh?
I think I'm veering into the world of armchair taxonomic splitters....
sounds better than being an "armchair lumper".
-Gary



Mike & Diane Wise wrote:
> 
> Gary,
> 
> Maybe it's because Loiselle believes it is not Pv. taeniatus, but Pv. callipterus
> - and he has some good arguments for this idea.
> 
> Mike Wise
> 
> Frauley/Elson wrote:
> 
> > Moliwe is a weird taeniatus though. It's fairly forgiving compared to
> > some other populations.
> > Gary




Pelvicachromis taeniatus

by coenga/infonie.fr (Dujardin Colin)
Date: Wed, 19 Apr 2000
To: apisto/majordomo.pobox.com (Apisto mailing list)

Moe Balika wrote:
> 
> We are looking for some advice. We bought 2f, 1m pelvicachromis taeniatus
> "Nyete" at the Detroit ACA last summer. Since then we have tried everything
> to get them to spawn. (ph,hardness, switched females,more water changes
> etc..) The female is always displaying to the male but the male does not pay
> any attention to her at all. Any suggestions?
> 
> Moe & Deb


As Gary said, there's no absolute trick but i may add others tricks.

        Add another male (if the tank is large enough). This may
stimulate competition between the two males. I have a one year old
sexually mature son with my pair of Pv teaniatus moliwe, and i can see
much more coutship displaying from the father than before.
        I know it might be difficult to find another "Nyete" male
around.
        If it's not available may be a male pulcher, which i hope
(somebody can tell ?) won't be able to interbreed, would do the trick.
Try to find a not to big pulcher male so it won't harm your rare
"Nyete".
        In the same idea, there's what i call the puppet trick. Some
breeders in England used it with success. You have to draw, paint or
print a color puppet of a male taeniatus in full colour and move it near
the glass of your tank. It will make an harmless sexual competitor for
your male. you just need to have time playing with the puppet.
        The parallel tank goes for the same. Having your Nyete tank side
by side with another Pelvicachiomis tank may induce response of your
male if he can see another Pelvicachromis male displaying in sight
range.

Hoping that this may help..
but patience is a virtue :-)

Colin
dreaming of various taeniatus colour forms  




Ailing krib and Krib genetics

by Mike & Diane Wise <apistowise/bewellnet.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Mar 2000
To: apisto/majordomo.pobox.com

I agree with this entirely. There are several color morphs of Pv. pulchra that
have been mixed in the hobby over the years. It's similar to what we were doing
with A. agassizii a few years back.

There is a good reason not to cross populations unless breeding for special
traits. Many of the color populations may actually be separate "sibling species"
that deserve to be preserved. Gary's example of Pv. "taeniatus" Lobe & Lokoundje
is a prime example. Dr. Loiselle has seen "taeniatus" species of 2 different
color morphs living together, but not interbreeding. This sounds like we are
dealing with two very different species here. We might not be able to separate
them, but it seems that the fish can! Paul can recognize at least 3 species
within the taeniatus-complex. He considers Lobe to be Pv. kribensis. Paul
considers Lokoundje to be Pv. callipterus since it comes from the type locality
of Pv. callipterus and has features different from the true Nigerian taeniatus
and the true kribensis. He told me that species differences can be seen on live
fish, but they all look alike once preserved.

Mike Wise


> If you look at the books, P. taeniatus is subdivided into a number of
> distinct morphs that breeders respect, but P. pulcher, in my opinion as
> diverse a fish but 'too familiar' doesn't get the same respect. People
> who would never cross taeniatus 'Lobe' with 'Loukoudje' will happily mix
> pulcher morphs.
> Then again, I love aquarium form pulcher...
> Gary
>
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
> This is the apistogramma mailing list, apisto@listbox.com.
> For instructions on how to subscribe or unsubscribe or get help,
> email apisto-request@listbox.com.
> Search http://altavista.digital.com for "Apistogramma Mailing List Archives"!






Up to Apistogramma/Dwarf Cichlids <- The Krib
This page was last updated 30 July 2000