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Suitable tankmates for Apistos

Contents:

  1. New to the List -Reply
    by Donald Nute <dnute/aisun1.ai.uga.edu> (Wed, 6 Nov 1996)
  2. Corys & Apistos
    by Pete Johnson <petej/wordsanddeeds.com> (Fri, 7 Mar 97)
  3. Corys and Apistos
    by Tom Mroz <tmroz/art-inc.com> (Mon, 10 Mar 1997)
  4. SAE alae blah blah
    by Michael W McGrath <mcgrath/citilink.com> (Fri, 22 Aug 1997)
  5. Which Cichlids -Help
    by Donald Nute <dnute/ai.uga.edu> (Mon, 27 Oct 1997)
  6. A. staecki; Ramshorn egg eaters?; Suspicion
    by "Maladorno, Dionigi" <DIONIGI.MALADORNO/roche.com> (Fri, 05 Dec 1997)
  7. Show down at the O.K. Tank
    by "Darren J. Hanson" <djhanson/calweb.com> (Sun, 16 Nov 1997)
  8. tetras (as tankmates)
    by Fredrik.Ljungberg/saab.se (Wed, 26 Nov 1997)
  9. A. cruzi?
    by "r_gomes" <r_gomes/email.msn.com> (Tue, 27 Jan 1998)
  10. Discus and Apistos
    by Frauley/Elson <fraulels/minet.ca> (Sat, 13 Jun 1998)
  11. some questions...
    by "Darren J. Hanson" <djhanson/calweb.com> (Mon, 10 Aug 1998)
  12. Peckoltia
    by Mike Downey <windwalker/uky.campus.mci.net> (Mon, 7 Sep 1998)
  13. A. sp. "rotpunkt"
    by <kathy/thekrib.com> (Mon, 5 Oct 1998)
  14. (No Title)
    by "Cory and Susanne Williamson" <webwill/infinet.net> (Sat, 17 Apr 1999)
  15. Apistos in a community tank
    by "Max Gallade" <m.gallade/jdneuhaus.com> (Wed, 17 Nov 1999)
  16. Dwarf cichlid question
    by Mike & Diane Wise <apistowise/bewellnet.com> (Mon, 15 Nov 1999)
  17. Will Plecos eat apisto eggs?
    by BigJohnW/webtv.net (John Wubbolt) (Wed, 28 Jun 2000)
  18. RE: WARNING newbie type questions
    by "Sanford, Dave LHS-STAFF" <Sanfordd/issaquah.wednet.edu> (Tue, 20 Jun 2000)
  19. raising fry with killie fry??
    by Frauley/Elson <fraulels/minet.ca> (Thu, 30 Dec 1999)
  20. safe catfish
    by Jota Melgar <jsmelgar/compuserve.com> (Sun, 23 Apr 2000)
  21. safe catfish
    by BigJohnW/webtv.net (John Wubbolt) (Sun, 23 Apr 2000)
  22. safe catfish
    by "gkadar" <gkadar/idirect.ca> (Sun, 23 Apr 2000)
  23. safe catfish
    by Kathy Olson <kathy/thekrib.com> (Mon, 24 Apr 2000)
  24. Apistos and corys in community tank?
    by Kathy Olson <kathy/thekrib.com> (Wed, 26 Jul 2000)

New to the List -Reply

by Donald Nute <dnute/aisun1.ai.uga.edu>
Date: Wed, 6 Nov 1996
To: William Vannerson <William_Vannerson/ama-assn.org>

On Wed, 6 Nov 1996, William Vannerson wrote:

> I don't keep any apistos ... yet.  I'll be getting some labidochromus
> ceruleas "electric yellows" for my first cichlid tank.  I'd also like to get a
> few Rams for my community tank, which has several (5) male Killies. 
> Wright, you're on both lists, do you think I'd run into any problems with
> this experiment.

I keep killies and dwarf Neotropical cichlids together routinely without
any problems. Now I have F. gardneri and A. nijsseni housed together. I've
kept A. bivattatum with A. borelli, A. bitaeniatum with Laetacara, and
Cynolebias whitei with P. altispinnosa, all without much conflict. The
only problem I ran into was when the Laetacara developed some disease that
also wiped out my A. bitaeniatum. However, killies dumped in with small
African cichlids become hors d'oevres. That's how I cull my killies.

All I have in Apistos and look-alikes right now are a couple of P. 
altispinnosa (apparently both males), a female A. nijsseni (male just
wasted away and died this week - sigh!), and a large unidentified female. 
I'm just getting back into Apistos and they are hard to find around here.

------------------------------------------------------------------
Donald Nute
Professor and Head, Department of Philosophy        (706) 542-2823
Director, Artificial Intelligence Center            (706) 542-0358
The University of Georgia                       FAX (706) 543-2839
Athens, Georgia  30602, U.S.A       http://ai.uga.edu/faculty/nute


Corys & Apistos

by Pete Johnson <petej/wordsanddeeds.com>
Date: Fri, 7 Mar 97
To: "apisto" <apisto/aquaria.net>

>I've read apisto's and cory's are a volatile mix -with the cory's ending
>up floating. I've been too concerned by this to actually try. First hand
>experience anyone?.

I keep dwarf corys with A. agazzizi and A. gibbiceps without incident. 
I've also heard someone warn about this -- along with Otocinclus sp. -- 
but my experience so far does not support the warning. Some of the 
nastier Apistos such as nijsseni and pandurini might be a problem.

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Corys and Apistos

by Tom Mroz <tmroz/art-inc.com>
Date: Mon, 10 Mar 1997
To: "'Apisto/aquaria.net'" <Apisto/aquaria.net>

I have never seen a direct attack of an Apisto on a corydoras, and in fact, 
rarely see it even with somewhat bigger dwarfs such as Pelvicachromis. 
 When females are on spawns, there is more aggression, but it appears to be 
only defensive in nature, and limited to the immediate region around the 
spawn site.  I have not lost spawns to corys, but I do keep some light on 
in the vicinity of the spawning tanks.  I do frequently loose spawns to the 
females themselves, typically bit by bit, or on the second night.  But 
that's another topic.

I don't keep corys in all my apisto tanks, and where I do, they are 
typically excess paleatus from previous Cory spawning attempts.  I keep all 
of my corys together in a 55 gallon, where I can keep the temperature low, 
the water current high, and the feedings of blackworms heavy.  My corys in 
Apisto tanks never get blackworms, and thus are not ever in breeding 
condition.  They are there mainly to help clean up the bottom from stray 
pellet and frozen food - a job they do well.

As for the aggressive nature of nijsseni and pandurini, I agree that their 
volatility tends to be focused on conspecifics, and rarely on other tank 
inhabitants.  Further, I have found that once a pair of pandurinis has been 
established, their aggressive interactions calm way down, even in a 10 
gallon tank!  I have a pair spawning each week, and the female readily 
allows the male to patrol the outer reaches of the tank, and even 
occasionally come near the spawning cave.  Now if only she would'nt consume 
the spawn the second night!


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SAE alae blah blah

by Michael W McGrath <mcgrath/citilink.com>
Date: Fri, 22 Aug 1997
To: Apistogramma mailing List <apisto/majordomo.pobox.com>

I have two tanks with apistos. One is a really well planted 30g, with 3
ottos and SAE and 2 corys and 2 gouramis, not to mention my apistos that
breed like clockwork. My SAE is a tank. He will fight the apistos,
even when 2 attack while protecting fry. He munchs food any time he can,
far as I am concerned, In my setup, he is useless and will betaken 
back, even if I have to pay for them to take it! Now my other tank is
planted, not as densely. This 20g serves as a fry tank and I have a school
of 3 ottos that clean this tank. The apistos have no idea what they are,
they just sorta 'sniff' the otto and leave it alone.
I'd try some ottos. They do not eat fry eggs or food.

Mike


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Which Cichlids -Help

by Donald Nute <dnute/ai.uga.edu>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 1997
To: apisto/majordomo.pobox.com

I have to disagree with Wright on breeding Apistos in a community
tank. I've had success with A. caetei, A. borelli, A. cacatuoides,
and A. agassizii in well-planted community tanks no larger than
10 gallons. I would think many of these species would be successful
in a 55 gallon community tank, although you certainly can't expect
to raise as many fry in these conditions. Still, my goal is not to
raise the maximum number of fry but to enjoy the fish and their
behavior. I have tetras, killies, rainbows, and corys in my dwarf
tanks ranging from 10, 20, and 30 to 55 gallons. In a 55 gallon, I
would try a harem of one species or pairs of two different species
of Apisto in a well-planted tank with a "flock" of 15-20 tetras,
killies, rainbows, danios in the middle to upper reaches of the
tank and maybe a few corys or ottos. I have had periods when nobody
wanted to spawn and periods (like now) where they seem to spawn 
on the carport as I bring them home. Right now, I have A. caetei,
A. mcmasteri, A. cacatuoides, and A. borelli all with fry. But
don't be discouraged if your fish take a while to settle in. A year
ago, I was struggling to keep my Apistos alive, much less spawning -
even though I have been keeping fish for 25 years and had success
with Apistos before. I still don't know what I was doing wrong.
Maybe I was just watching them too much.

- ------------------------------------------------------------------
Donald Nute
Professor and Head, Department of Philosophy        (706) 542-2823
Director, Artificial Intelligence Center            (706) 542-0358
The University of Georgia                       FAX (706) 542-2839
Athens, Georgia  30602, U.S.A     http://ai.uga.edu/faculty/~dnute

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A. staecki; Ramshorn egg eaters?; Suspicion

by "Maladorno, Dionigi" <DIONIGI.MALADORNO/roche.com>
Date: Fri, 05 Dec 1997
To: "'apisto/majordomo.pobox.com'" <apisto/majordomo.pobox.com>

A little while ago I bought three pairs of Apistos, of which one was
clearly A. njesseni, one turned out to be A. maciliense (formerly a
subspecies of trifasciata, if I understand well) and the third was still
to small to say.
Now that those are bigger, I think they match pretty well the
characteristics of A. staecki (short lyrate tail with rows of spots,
rather slender body, small size, dark blotches on the back, around the
insertion of the dorsal fin). The only difference compared to the
picture on of the book by Linke and Staeck is that the first 1-2 rays of
the dorsal fin are black. If anybody has useful or interesting
information on this species, I would appreciate to hear it.
Also, they have already bred, in soft water, only moderately acidic and
sometimes neutral (recently pH has been creeping up in my tanks,
probably in consequence to changes in the tapwater). If anybody in the
north NJ area is interested in exchanges, drop me an e-mail in January,
to see how things are going.
Incidentally, they are in a small tank (2.5 gal., one third for the male
and the rest for the female, the filter and the heater. They seem quite
comfortable in such small space, since anyway they do not move much away
from their hiding spaces).


The A. maciliense are now at their second spawn. After their first one,
I separated the male behind a partition. The fry have been growing very
slowly (at least compared to A. cacatuoides or L. curviceps), and three
days ago I decided to move both parents to a 2.5 gal. Yesterday I saw
the typical female defensive/aggressive behavior, and in fact there were
eggs in the flowerpot. What surprised me was that of the 20 or so
ramshorn snails in the tank, about 15 were by the eggs (the poor female
was desperate!), and the size of the spawn was much smaller than last
time. I interpreted it as if the snails were having a good dinner, and
they promptly became a calcium-rich snack for my Discus (not that I feel
good killing snails, but I have no place to put them). Several eggs
survived, and now the female is watching them by herself (I moved the
male back behind the partition of the original tank). 

One suspicion on which I would like to hear some feedback. I wonder if
it is possible that if after spawning I keep the male and female
separate for too long (say, 6-8 weeks), often once back together it
takes a long time before the female lays eggs again. On the contrary, if
I separate them only for few weeks, the promptly spawn again once
re-united.  Is this possible?



Dionigi Maladorno
dionigi.maladorno-at-roche.com
This message presents personal opinions which are not necessarily those
of my employer.

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Show down at the O.K. Tank

by "Darren J. Hanson" <djhanson/calweb.com>
Date: Sun, 16 Nov 1997
To: apisto/majordomo.pobox.com

Anyways, they don't seem to be getting physical, but has
>anyone else experienced this?? Is it bad news or what? Soon as I see any
>violence I will remove the cacatuoides to his old tank.
>
>Thanks.
>
>Mike

I have housed more than one species of Apistos in the same tank. The
difference was that I also had the females in with them. I don't see why you
should have any real trouble as long as there are no females. Right now, I
have a 55 gallon community plant tank with a handful of A. cacatuoides and a
pair of A. bitaeniata. No problems. The male cacatuoide is only flaring at
his own kind and is ignoring the other species. There are also some Black
Neons, Otos, and Bristlenose plecos (my babies) and a handful of Albino
Guppies. Everything is fine. If in the future you do plan on spawning them,
put ONE pair in a tank of their own. Let nature take its' course.

Hope this helped.

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tetras (as tankmates)

by Fredrik.Ljungberg/saab.se
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 1997
To: apisto/majordomo.pobox.com

Hi all

Regarding the Congo tetras I'd agree with Randy. My
P. taeniatus "Moliwe", still being quite small, seem
to have no prob with the big fish, even at feeding time.
My very shy Ch. guntheri managed just fine when I had
them in there as well.

If tetras is a must, the number of choices is limited.
Hemigrammopetersius. caudalis is an excellent one. I haven't
tried the Neolebias species so no comment.

If tankmates, in general, is the question, I'd turn to
killies. The Lampeyes, which someone already mentioned, are
the African equivalent of smaller, schooling tetras. The
Procatopus-species are generally harder to keep end breed
than the Aplocheilichthys, as well as harder to come by.
They are very cool and a good match.

Smaller Epiplatys and Aphyosemion work as well. I have had
Epiplatys with SA and WA dwarfs without any
problems. Certain species of Epiplatys may be inappropriate
(generally the larger ones) because they're predators.
I've had Ep. chaperi, dageti, grahami, lamottei and singa
with great success (roloffi with no success...).
They hang out just below the surface and are good
dithers for really shy dwarfs (and they are easy to keep
and breed!!).

Aphyosemions are extremely colourful killies, mid water
level swimmers. Many of the smaller species will work just
fine. They have more colour and are more lively than the
Epiplatys. Aph gabunense, striatum, bivittatum, australe
should work fine,

If the tank is big enough, why not a few Epiplatys at the
top and a school of H. caudalis for the middle???


//Fredrik





-- 
Fredrik.Ljungberg-at-saab.se
Saab Ab 
Flutter and Loads Department
voice +46 13 18 54 60, fax +46 13 18 33 63

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A. cruzi?

by "r_gomes" <r_gomes/email.msn.com>
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 1998
To: <apisto/majordomo.pobox.com>

I agree with Ken.  I have/had a breeding pair of Kribs and when the pair
were spawning they kept all of the others in the tank (A.Biteniata, S.
Jurupari, tetras, etc.) on the other side of the tank...Very aggressive.
-----Original Message-----
From: Ken Laidlaw <K.Laidlaw-at-roe.ac.uk>
To: apisto-at-majordomo.pobox.com <apisto-at-majordomo.pobox.com>
Date: Monday, January 26, 1998 12:20 AM
Subject: Re: A. cruzi?


>
>> Hi!
>> I am planning to add a pair of cribs to my tank with pair of Cruzi. (My
>> friend's larger pair of cribs is about to spawn and does not tolerate
>> anyone around). This pair is much smaller then my Cruzi (1-1.5" vs
>> 2-2.5"). Will they have any problems getting together or it is not a good
>> idea at all? My cruzi continue to live separately and I almost do not see
>> them so may be a little fight will give them shake-up?
>
>Hi,
>This is probably dependant on the size of tank.  It may
>work if the tank is 36" or larger.  Make sure to include
>many hiding places if things turn nasty.  I would think
>that an Apisto could not stand up to a Pelvicachromis
>species.
>
>Ken.
>
>
>
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Discus and Apistos

by Frauley/Elson <fraulels/minet.ca>
Date: Sat, 13 Jun 1998
To: apisto/majordomo.pobox.com

> Andy writes:
> 
> > I am planning a 55 gallon planted tank with Apistos and a pair of Discus and
> >  some small tetras.  Any suggestions as to what type of apistos would be
> > great.
> >  I'm thinking Borelli.  Any tips would be greatly appreciated. I'd like, of
> >  course, both the Discus and the Apistos to spawn in this tank.
> 
I saw a pair of panduro spawning in an 80 gallon Discus tank today. It
was a bare tank, and the apistos were spawning in a corner. They were
defending 1/3 of the tank against half a dozen adult-sized discus, and
terrorizing them, even as they were laying the eggs. 
It was something to think about.
-Gary


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some questions...

by "Darren J. Hanson" <djhanson/calweb.com>
Date: Mon, 10 Aug 1998
To: apisto/majordomo.pobox.com

> Any other comments on this will be appreciated.
I have kept corys, because I breed them, with apistos but only until the
apistos begin spawning. Basically for the same reason that Rich had
sited. The corys will go and eat the fry and are not bother by the
female trying to keep them out of her 'house'. I have the same problem
in a 100 gallon community tank with a pair of wild kribs that spawn on a
regular basis.

Good luck

Kaycy


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Peckoltia

by Mike Downey <windwalker/uky.campus.mci.net>
Date: Mon, 7 Sep 1998
To: apisto/majordomo.pobox.com

>> I would worry about the zebra pleco eating eggs.  They are armored well
>enough
>> that the parent Apistos won't have much affect on them.
>
>Anyone know if Peckoltias do this too? I have a couple with my Nannochromis
>but will whip em out in jiffy if they're risky!
>Jason

Most of the Peckoltias will eat fry on the bottom at night. ( Not All but
most).
My zebras (4) would eat 12 ghoast shrimp each week. They must catch them at
night?

Mike



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A. sp. "rotpunkt"

by <kathy/thekrib.com>
Date: Mon, 5 Oct 1998
To: apisto/majordomo.pobox.com



On Mon, 5 Oct 1998, J Miller wrote:

> I have three A. sp. "rotpunkt" in a twenty gallon community tank.  I have at
> least one male (1.5' w/ blue specs on his head) and one female (1' w/ black
> on her pelvic fins) the other is  just under 1'.  Also in the tank are three
> emperor tetras, two bronze corys, and one clown pleco.  There is plenty of
> rock and wood work for hiding and some java fern and java moss in the tank
> as well.  
> 

Should work, but watch out for those emporers.  We had a pair of P pulcher
that spawned and tormented everyone in a 75 gallon tank until we put in 3
emporer tetras.  Never saw fry again and the emporer totally destroyed the
community atmosphere of the tank.  The rummy nose tetras and the D.
filamentosus never came out any more.  They were mean little buggers, we
gave them away and all returned to normal.

Kathy



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(No Title)

by "Cory and Susanne Williamson" <webwill/infinet.net>
Date: Sat, 17 Apr 1999
To: <apisto/admin.listbox.com>

Maybe my tank is the exception, but I have a whole bunch of other fish in my 90 gal plant tank where the rams spawned. As a habitat biologist I always carry that phrase from the Kevin Costner movie about that ball park in the cornfield 'if you build it they will come'- I think even in the busiest tank, if you give your fish the right conditions they will spawn. My rams took a year and a half to start spawning regularly, but now when they are fed regularly and well, they spawn every week and a half to two weeks. The one big caveat is that the babies don't last long in that setting (but I could never take care of them all anyway. The rams are not agressive enought to keep the other fish out (unlike the apistos). My water is pH=3D6.4, KH=3D3, GH=3D4, Temp 78-F. I almost forgot to mention what seemed to be the most important trigger for spawning (assuming everthing else was right already)- I placed a very flat rock (about 10-cm in diameter) in the area that two of my four rams liked to court in- they spawned the next day.

Good luck!

Cory Williamson

    -----Original Message-----
    From: Mike & Diane Wise <apistowise@bewellnet.com>
    To: apisto@admin.listbox.com <apisto@admin.listbox.com>
    Date: April 17, 1999 7:24 AM
    Subject: Re:

    Kym,
    Appears you have wall-to-wall bottom dwellers! Move the Rams to a 
breeding tank. Your community is too "busy" for breeding!=20

    K & D Martin wrote:

         Cool!  WHat are your water specifics?  I have 5 of these guys 
and no one is making any sort of move, i've had them since October and 
they weren't much smaller then so i think they are of age.  My water is 
RO, about 6.8, about 82 degrees, 1 degree GH.   I don't know if it is 
the fact there are other fish in there, got a pleco, large one, i need 
to get out of there, and a bunch of kribs and one pesky pink convict 
that was supposed to have been dinner months ago but managed to survive, 
he is now much bigger than any of the dwarfs and bugging everything, i 
have tried about everything to catch him but i have too many nooks and 
crannies in there.  Also got some clown loaches and tetras.  Any advice? 

        kym


Apistos in a community tank

by "Max Gallade" <m.gallade/jdneuhaus.com>
Date: Wed, 17 Nov 1999
To: "Apisto/Listbox. Com" <apisto/listbox.com>

Hi all,
I'm a long time  reader "lurker" of the list.I'm a Apisto , SA dwarf cichlid
nut for a few years.I was born and raised in Germany and moved to the US 11
years ago.
I stumbled across a very interesting statement in Uwe Römer's Book
"Cichliden Atlas" that I translated for y'all to kick around(Page 306
-308)Aquarium Biology  A.bitaenniata,beginning of 4th sentence:
An optimum keeping  would be in groups of ca.10-20 individuals of this
species w.small characins or small top oriented Bachlingen (Pencilfish?) in
relatively soft humic acidic water.Corydoras,ancistrine and loriiciid
catfish or small pike cichlids (dwarf crenicichla)would be adequate aquarium
companions.In contrary to the often in the aquarium world mentioned
fear,healthy dwarf cichlid are very able to raise their brood around catfish
and small crenicichla,if they have enough hiding places.In such aquarium
keeping which I practise for many years,the breeding  success is not as high
as single pair keeping, but it is high enough to keep the line going,and the
fish develope their complete natural behavior repertoire.Unfortunately many
aquaristik publications suffer under the little knowledge their authors have
about the behavior potential of the above mentioned species.
A.bitaeniata is e.g.in isolated pair keeping (like other Apistogramma
species)often very aggressiv what could lead to death.The fish stay polygam
in bigger tanks,if you keep groups in an enemy free situation.The males will
defend large territories in which they will breed with as many females as
possible.If enemy fish appear like fry robbing dwarf crenicichla the fish
will build a binding pair that will defend their fry together against the
enemys.The roles between the sexes are strictly divided:The male defends the
larger breeding area of ca.20cm radius or the fry and the fem.mainly takes
care of the eggs,larvey or fry.If an overwhelming predator appears both
partners will collect as many fry as they can in their mouth and move them
out of the dangerzone.Therefore only the fry that the parents are able to
collect will survive in the wild.There are of course a few graduations
between these extremes.In any case has the behavior under such husbandry
more diversity and is closer to the wild behavior than single pair keeping.
Plus another aspekt of the husbandry with enemy fish is the avoidance of
mass reproduction.Only pairs that have the biological behavorial adaption
potential will have reproduction success.End of translation, M.W.  slab me
if I made to many mistakes.
Very happy to have two weeks old A.nijsseni fry .
Max Galladè




Dwarf cichlid question

by Mike & Diane Wise <apistowise/bewellnet.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Nov 1999
To: apisto/majordomo.pobox.com

Walter,

I doubt that the Rams would breed in the same tank with A. cacatuoides unless it
was very, very large > 8 feet long. Males of highly polygamous species like A.
cacatuoides have been reported to defend tanks over 2 meters long. Rams really
don't like a lot of disturbances when breeding or they will eat their eggs/fry.
Being smaller than male cacatuoides, and much less aggressive they wouldn't do
very well and definitely be out competed in every way. I'd try A. cacatuoides
with a dwarf Laetacara or maybe Bolivian Rams.

Mike Wise

Walter Igharas wrote:

> I am very curious and interested in the butterfly Ram and Cuckatoo.
> I was wondering if it is possible to have a pair of both species
> in a single tank. If it is possible what would be the minimum required
> tank
> size be? Also what types of plants are suitable for the both species to
> feel comfortable?
> Thanks.
>
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Will Plecos eat apisto eggs?

by BigJohnW/webtv.net (John Wubbolt)
Date: Wed, 28 Jun 2000
To: apisto/majordomo.pobox.com

Hello All
I dont keep any plecos in my apisto tanks, but i do have to admit that
recently i added several ottos to my tank that my Apisto Piauensis were
in.   I didnt think that the pair would spawn in the tank with the ottos
in there, but they proved me wrong.   The tank had built up a good layer
of algae on the side walls and back wall.  My intensions were to put the
ottos in there to clean up the tank and then remove them so the fish
could spawn again.   Well the Piauensis spawned again and now have about
30+ wigglers inside the flower pot.   The ottos never go anywhere near
the opening to the flower pot. I used a terra cotta pot cut in half and
place such that the open end faces towards the front of the tank such
that i can see into it.    So i dont know if plecos would bother apisto
eggs or fry, but these ottos dont even seem interested in going near the
cave opening.   I also have kept plecos in with Kribs and had no
problems getting the Kribs to raise fry in that tank successfully
without the plecos picking off any eggs or fry.   So I kind of think
keeping some type of work horse catfish in with my pairs might not be
too bad.   I'm gonna try this with some young bushy nose ancistrus i
have and see what takes place.

John




RE: WARNING newbie type questions

by "Sanford, Dave LHS-STAFF" <Sanfordd/issaquah.wednet.edu>
Date: Tue, 20 Jun 2000
To: "'apisto/majordomo.pobox.com'" <apisto/majordomo.pobox.com>

I would not add corys to a tank if you want babies. The parents probably
could defend the eggs/fry but why risk it?
Small pencil fish make good additions, small mouths and a tendency to stay
near the surface. Keep the tank covered because the parents will dart at the
pencils and they jump out!  For maximum fry production, don't add any other
fish, and remove the male once the fry are free swimming. I have had
brooding females kill males before in 5 and 10 gal. Never a problem in 20
gal. 
dave




raising fry with killie fry??

by Frauley/Elson <fraulels/minet.ca>
Date: Thu, 30 Dec 1999
To: apisto/majordomo.pobox.com

John Wubbolt wrote:
> 
> Hello everyone
> Does anyone else out there raise their young apisto fry with young
> killifish fry?   I've got a tank of young Veijita ll fry growing out
> with some pachypanchax playfairi fry.   They seem to be perfect
> tankmates, the apisto fry stay down towards the bottom of the tank and
> the killie fry stay up towards the surface.   I've done this in the past
> raising Gardneri Nsukka fry with Cruzi fry and Chocolate Australes with
> Cacatuoides.   I was wondering if anyone else does this to save on tank
> space and what their experiences were: either good or bad.   Thanks for
> any advice.
> 
> By the way, everyone have a Happy New Year.
> 
> John

Hi John,
Happy New year.
I raise some killies with apistos. Generally, I stick with Epiplatys,
lampeyes and Chromaphyosemions. Many Fundulopanchax and Aphyosemions
that favour the bottom get slaughtered. I made an error a few weeks ago
by putting 20 2cm F. gardneri Mamfense in with 12 or so 1cm A. sp.
vielfleck. The Apistos killed all but one gardneri, which they seem now
to tolerate as one of their own.
About ten minutes ago, I moved some Epiplatys cf olbrechtsi away from
aga Alenquers they'd grown up with, as 2 Alenquers have fry. That was a
long standing relationship.
Gary




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safe catfish

by Jota Melgar <jsmelgar/compuserve.com>
Date: Sun, 23 Apr 2000
To: "INTERNET:apisto/majordomo.pobox.com" <apisto/majordomo.pobox.com>

I think both, John and Dave, are in part correct. Most Corys will compete
with Apistos for the same resources. Having said that, the dwarf Corys (at
least pygmaeus and hastatus) might be exception. These two species (can't
remember about habrosus) prefer to stay in midwater, thus not competing
with Apistos as much as your more "typical" Cory. I haven't kept them
together but I can see how one can breed Apistos with dwarf Corys.

Now, question to John. Have you been succesful breeding the dwarf Corys
with Apistos? 

Julio 


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safe catfish

by BigJohnW/webtv.net (John Wubbolt)
Date: Sun, 23 Apr 2000
To: apisto/majordomo.pobox.com

Hello Julio
To answer your question, yes.   I just had my pygmaeus  spawn with
viable eggs in a tank with a pair of cacatuoides.   When i saw the eggs
there were only about 20 or so which i removed from the tank.   But then
again this is not a normal low number of eggs for pygmaeus.

John




safe catfish

by "gkadar" <gkadar/idirect.ca>
Date: Sun, 23 Apr 2000
To: <apisto/majordomo.pobox.com>

O.K.  I gotta put my 2 cents worth in here.  My apistos spawned in the same
tank and successfully raised their fry to adulthood, I may add, in a tank
with 3 aeneas and 1 melanistius corys (plus 5 clown loaches).  Of course it
isn't a bare bottom tank, it's a jungle, but nevertheless the corys (and
clowns) stayed out of apisto territory.  The aeneas corys do their mating
dances and I assume they spawn, but so far zilch.  Upstairs at the tank
surface I just discovered my third generation of dwarf gourami as well.
Cute.  This, I thought would be impossible because of the presence of
guppies.......seems pop gourami does a much better job of guarding his area
than I would have given credit.

Gabriella




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safe catfish

by Kathy Olson <kathy/thekrib.com>
Date: Mon, 24 Apr 2000
To: apisto/majordomo.pobox.com

Collecting in the wild, we caught pygmaeus in the same netfulls as
apisto's.  It was quite fun :)
So they do occur together in the wild, within inches of each other.  The
cory's were a little more clustered together but all were within feet of
each other.

Kathy


On Sat, 22 Apr 2000, John Wubbolt wrote:

> try pygmaeus or habrosus corys, they are the dwarf species that are good
> in with apisto fry.  But you have to wait until the apisto fry are big
> enough ( like 4 weeks old or older )  that they cant be eaten by the
> corys.   Newborn apisto fry are small enough to be attacked by the corys
> if they are hungry enough.
> 
> John
> 
> 
> 
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> For instructions on how to subscribe or unsubscribe or get help,
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> 




Apistos and corys in community tank?

by Kathy Olson <kathy/thekrib.com>
Date: Wed, 26 Jul 2000
To: apisto/majordomo.pobox.com

Kristo,

When we collected on the Rio Solimoes, I got Cory. hastatus in water just
a little shallower than where I was scooping out bunches of apisto's.
It was very cool, one inch of water...cory's.  Two inches of
water...apisto's.  The color was great on the wild ones.  Now I have them
in a community tank with the apisto's and splash tetras I pulled out of
the same local.  There are probably 15 apistois in the 40 gallon, along
with the cory's and tetra's.  Despite that density there are a few apisto
fry that manage to make it and grow up.  It has been really nice to
observe community behavior.  If you want to raise lots of fry though it is
probably best not to have them/a lot of fish in the tank.

Pete Johnson use to keep pygmaes or hastatus in with his spawning fish as
well.  Not sure if he noticed fry loss.  I would suspect they would pick
off a few fry.

Kathy

On Wed, 26 Jul 2000, Kristo K M Kulju wrote:

> 
> Hello all! I have a 140 liter community tank with pair of A. panduro, 10
> black neon tetras and 1 Ancistrus sp. I'd like to have some corys in my
> tank. Is mixing apistos and corys a good idea? I have heard that C.
> pygmaeus would be suitable tankmate for apistos. How about other tiny
> corys like C. habrosus or hastatus? Do smaller corys generally get along
> better with apistos?
> 
> Thanks for any help,
> 
> 	Kristo
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 




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This page was last updated 17 February 2002